• This topic has 27 voices and 113 replies.
Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 114 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #357716

    Anonymous

    Petar „Pecija“ Popović (Serbian: Петар Пеција Поповић, 1826-1875) was Serbian hajduk from Western Bosna and leader of few rebelions against Turks in second half of 19th century.

    image

    Miloš Obilić (Serbian: Милош Обилић; died 1389) was a medieval Serbian knight in the service of Prince Lazar, during the invasion of the Ottoman Empire. He is not mentioned in contemporary sources, but he features prominently in later accounts of the Serbian defeat at the Battle of Kosovo as the legendary assassin of the Ottoman sultan Murad I. Although he remains anonymous in the extant sources until the 18th century, the dissemination of the story of Murad's assassination in Florentine, Serbian, Ottoman and Greek sources suggests that versions of it circulated widely across the Balkans within half a century after the event.

    Miloš became a major figure in Serbian epic poetry, in which he is elevated to the level of the most noble national hero of medieval Serbian folklore. Acording to some legends he was child of Dragon and vila and Car Dušan raised him. Some epic poems see in him son.in-law of Serbian Prince St. Lazar
    [img height=328]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/21/Milos_Obilic_Hilandar.jpg” />

    Bogdan Zimonjić (Serbian:Богдан Зимоњић; 1813-1909), Orthodox protopresbyter, Serbian vojvoda and leader of few rebelions in Hercegovina. Father of St. Petar of Sarajevo, WWII martyr.
    image

    Stevan Sinđelić (Serbian: Стеван Синђелић ; 1770 – May 19, 1809) was vojvoda of Resava Area during the Serbian Revolutionary War (1804-1813) against Ottoman Empire. As commander of the unit he participated in many small and large battles, as are Battle of Ivankovac in 1805 and Battle of Deligrad in 1806. In the battle of Čegar Hill for the Niš Fortress on 1809, his unit was surrounded by the enemy, without the help and with no way out, he decided to with pistol shoot in gunpowder, after which was created a huge explosion that shook the Čegar Hill. He is a symbol of patriotism, personal courage and sacrifice among the Serbs.
    [img height=288]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/52/Stevan_Sindjelic2.jpg” />

    Stojan Janković Mitrović (Serbian: Стојан Јанковић Митровић; 1636–1687) was the commander of the Dalmatian Serbs (Morlach army), in the service of the Republic of Venice, from 1669 until his death in 1687. He participated in the Cretan and Great Turkish War, as the supreme commander of the Venetian Serb troops, of which he is enumerated in Serb epic poetry. He was one of the three best-known uskok/hajduk leaders of Kotar.

    image

    #357717

    Anonymous

    [table]
    [tr]
    [td][img height=300]http://www.znanje.org/i/i25/05iv11/05iv11092027/423px-KnezMilosObrenovic.jpg” />[/td]
    [td]                    [/td]
    [td]Miloš Obrenović, Knez of Serbia

    Miloš Obrenović (pronounced [mîlɔʃ ɔbrɛ̌ːnɔʋitɕ]) (Serbian Cyrillic: Милош Обреновић; Anglicised: Milosh Obrenovich; born Miloš Teodorović) (18 March 1780 [7 March o.s.] – 26 September 1860) was Prince of Serbia from 1815 to 1839, and again from 1858 to 1860. He participated in the First Serbian Uprising, led Serbs in the Second Serbian Uprising, and founded the House of Obrenović. Under his rule, Serbia became an autonomous duchy within the Ottoman Empire. He is credited with starting the process of reestablishing Serbian statehood, as well as shaping the domestic and foreign policies of the modern Serbian state.

    – a great politician and the reestablisher of the current state[/td]
    [/tr]
    [/table]

    [hr]

    [table]
    [tr]
    [td][img height=300]http://en.academic.ru/pictures/enwiki/75/Kralj_Petar_I_Karadjordjevic.jpg” />[/td]
    [td]                    [/td]
    [td]Peter I. Karađorđević, King of Serbia

    Peter I (Serbian: Петар I Карађорђевић, Petar I Karađorđević) (29 June 1844 – 16 August 1921), was the King of Serbia from 1903 to 1918, and subsequently the ruler of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (officially renamed Kingdom of Yugoslavia in 1929) from 1918 until his death. He was a member of the Royal House of Karađorđević. As the leader of the victorious Serbian army in World War I, he also received the nickname "Liberator" (Oslobodilac) after the war.

    – our greatest king of the modern era[/td]
    [/tr]
    [/table]

    #357718

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    King Marko was the rightful successor of the Serbian Throne, but there are no recordings of him showing any claims in the struggle for it… However, he was ruler of a territory which corresponds roughly with the territory of modern Macedonia, stories and songs about him are present in the folklore of the local population, just as among other south Slavic peoples, and despite his heritage (it's often hard to trace heritage in the Middle Ages since all those dynastic intermarriages) he is considered a hero by the local Macedonians.

    That teritory is just part of modern Macedonia:
    [img height=288]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4a/Central_balkans_1373_1395.png” />
    Prince Marko was not able to fight for Serbian throne, since Mrnajvčevići army was anihilated in battle of Marica 1371. Lineage of Mrnjavčevići is from Zahumlje, he was probably born arround Trebinje (first mention of King Vukašin denotes him as župan of Trebinje is from 1346, Marko was born 1335). Marko was regarded as a man of trust by his father's co-ruler. He participated in state affairs (Negotations with Dubrovnik). He lived in modern Macedonia, but he considered himself legitimate Serbian ruler, I repeat, all of Macedonia, Northern Greece and large partions of Albania were under rule of Serbian feudal lords. As born in other part of Serbian state, being etc, he could not be considered native (ie Macedonian Serb). I am aware that there are poems about him in Macedonina, but honetly, it could not be even compared with number of Serbian poems about him.

    Quote:
    By the way, according to his very own Code, the title of Czar Dushan is described as "Macedonian Czar, the ruler of Serbian, Bulgarian, Hungaro-Wallachian, Dalmatian, Arbanashian and many other lands and regions". So, there is mention of Macedonians. :)

    I am sorry, but must object that statment. You could see text here: http://www.dusanov-zakonik.com/ There is no reference to any other nations except Serbs and Greeks in Code.
    His title in Greek was: βαδιλευς και αυτοκρατωρ Σερβιας και Ρωμανιας, in Old Church Slavonic his tile was longer:Азь в Хрїста Бога благовѣрни и Богомь поставлени Стефань, царь вьсемь Срьблѥмь и Грькѡмь и западнимь странамь, сирѣчь Арбанасѡмь, и Поморию и вьсемь Дисоу.
    There was no any mention on Macedonia in his diplomas, nor in code.

    Well, I repeat, I am not against Macedonians and Bulgarians seeing Marko Kraljević as part of their legacy, but he was not Macedonian nor Bulgarian in any sense. Politicaly (Serbian prince and statesman), Sociologicaly (member of Serbian nobility), Religously (he acknowledged Jurisdiction of Peć Patriarchate) ethnicaly, he was Serb and furthermore Serbian Serb.

    #357719

    Anonymous

    [table]
    [tr]
    [td][img height=300]http://www.freeimagehosting.net/uploads/452adf29df.jpg” />[/td]
    [td][img height=300]http://www.bogotrazitelj.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/02/sveti-simeon.jpg” />[/td]
    [td][img height=300]http://slovo-aso.cl.bas.bg/images/Hilandar-St_Simeon.jpg” />[/td]
    [td][img height=300]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/ce/Simeon_Ljeviska.jpg” />[/td]
    [/tr]
    [/table]

    There were Serbs that were older, more powerful, or more influential, but as historical personalities go, none is as important for the Serbs as Nemanja Vukanović is, the progenitor of the imperial dynasty, founding father of the Serb culture.

    Father to:


      [li]Stefan Nemanjić – Nemanja's successor, first

    King of All Serbian lands, 1196–1228[/li]
    [li]Rastislav 'Rastko' Nemanjić (Saint Sava) (1171–1236) – The first archbishop and saint of the Serbian Orthodox Church.[/li]
    [li]Vukan Nemanjić – Prince of Doclea and briefly Grand Prince of Rascia.[/li]
    [li]Jefimija – married Manuel Angelus Ducas Regent of Thesaloniki (+1241).[/li]
    [li]unknown daughter – married an unknown member of the Asen family, gave birth to the Bulgarian Tsar Constantine Tih Asen (reigned 1257–1277).[/li]

    Much is already written about him, his sons and descendants, as well as his legacy, so if interested feel free to read yourself through.

    #357720

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I am sorry, but must object that statment. You could see text here: http://www.dusanov-zakonik.com/ There is no reference to any other nations except Serbs and Greeks in Code.
    His title in Greek was: βαδιλευς και αυτοκρατωρ Σερβιας και Ρωμανιας, in Old Church Slavonic his tile was longer:Азь в Хрїста Бога благовѣрни и Богомь поставлени Стефань, царь вьсемь Срьблѥмь и Грькѡмь и западнимь странамь, сирѣчь Арбанасѡмь, и Поморию и вьсемь Дисоу.
    There was no any mention on Macedonia in his diplomas, nor in code.

    But that's the place I've got my information:

    http://www.dusanov-zakonik.com/ravanicki.htm

    I'm not an expert in Old Church Slavonic, but I read "…македонискаго цра стефана…" there, written with red ink.
    I guess his title varied with the different transcription of his Code.

    #357721

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    But that's the place I've got my information:

    http://www.dusanov-zakonik.com/ravanicki.htm

    I'm not an expert in Old Church Slavonic, but I read "…македонискаго цра стефана…" there, written with red ink.
    I guess his title varied with the different transcription of his Code.

    Yes, but that manuscript is from 17th century. From 14th century documents we have just mention of Serbs and Greeks. Anyway, it is off topic here :)

    #357722

    Anonymous

    Petar I Petrović Njegoš(St. Peter of Cetinje) (1747–1830) (Serbian Cyrillic: Петар I Петровић Његош, Свети Петар Цетињски) was the ruler of Montenegro, the Cetinje Episcop of the Serbian Orthodox Church (Serbian: Владика or Vladika) and Exarch (claimholder) of the Serbian Orthodox Church throne. He was the most popular spiritual and military leader from the Petrović dynasty. During his long rule, Petar strengthened the state by uniting the often quarreling tribes, consolidating his control over Montenegrin lands, introducing the first laws in Montenegro (Законик Петра I or Zakonik Petra I) and launching the first program of national liberation and unification of Serbs.
    image

    #357723

    Anonymous

    Radomir Putnik, also known as Vojvoda Putnik, (Serbian: Радомир Путник, Војвода Путник;  24 January 1847 – 17 May 1917) was a Serbian Field Marshal (vojvoda) and Chief of General Staff in the Balkan Wars and World War I, and took part in all wars that Serbia waged from 1876 to 1917. In 1903. Putnik waspromoted in General and apointed Chief of General Staff. He proceeded to completely reorganise the army, to retire old and promote new officers, and to update war plans. He appointed colonel Živojin Mišić as his aide. In 1912, he led the Serbian Army into victories in the First and Second Balkan War.  After the battle of Kumanovo, he became first officer to promoted to the highest rank of Vojvoda (Field Marshal). Under his able leadership Serbian Army defeated the Austrian Army's offensives in August and November 1914, driving it out of Serbia by December.

    [img height=240]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/da/Putnikdt4.jpg” />

    Stepan Stepanović, better known as Stepa Stepanpvić (Serbian:Степан Степановић, Степа Степановић  11 March [O.S. 28 February] 1856 – April 29, 1929) was a Field Marshal (vojvoda) of the Serbian Army who distinguished himself in Serbia's wars from 1876 to 1918. Stepanović obtained significant achievements in the war against the Turks, especially in the Battle of Adrianople in March 1913 during the First Balkan War, when his II Army with heavy artilery was sent to help Bulgarians. At the beginning of World War I he acted as deputy of then absent chief of staff Radomir Putnik. He was responsible for mobilization and some war preparations. After Putnik's return he returned to command of the II Army.  His Second Army won a great victory in the Battle of Cer,  completely defeating the Austrian Fifth Army, arriving to the scene after a forced march. This was the first allied victory of the war, and he was promoted to Vojvoda (Field-Marshal).

    [img height=240]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/sr/7/7f/Stepa_stepanovicvm.jpg” />

    Živojin Mišić (Serbian:Живојин Мишић) (July 19, 1855 Struganik – January 20, 1921 Belgrade) was a Vojvoda (Field Marshal) and arguably the most successful Serbian commander who participated in all Serbia's wars from 1876 to 1918. After the battle of Kumanovo of the First Balkan War, he was promoted to General. During the first months of World War I, along with General Stepa Stepanović, he planned movements of the Serbian II Army, which eventually won a victory at the mountain of Cer.  At the height of Battle of Kolubara Mišić was handed command over the Serbian I Army, then in very difficult situation. He insisted on  risky withdrawal of the whole Serbian army in order to gain time for some rest and improve supplies. His gamble, however, paid off as Austro-Hungarian army  was soundly beaten in the subsequent Serbian counteroffensive, which Mišić also initiated, and his army playing the decisive role. That was one of the greatest battles in the Serbian history and he was promoted to the rank of Vojvoda. At the Thessaloniki Front in 1916, he led the First Serbian Army, and was made Chief of staff of High command towards the end of the war, directing the Serbian Army operations in the breakthrough of Thessaloniki front in September 1918.

    [img height=240]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b4/Vojvoda_Zivojin_Misic.jpg” />

    Petar Bojović (Serbian:Петар Бојовић; July 16, 1858 in Miševići, Nova Varoš – January 20, 1945 in Belgrade) was one of four Serbian Vojvodas (field-marshals) in Balkan Wars and World War I.In the Balkan Wars, he was the Chief of Staff of the 1st Army (under command of Crown Prince Aleksandar), which scored huge success in battles of Kumanovo, Bitola (First Balkan War) and Bregalnica (Second Balkan War). After Battle of Kumanovo he was promoted to General. At the start of World War I, he was given command of the 1st Army. His army suffered huge losses at Battle of Drina, but managed to stop the Austro-Hungarian offensive. Bojović was wounded in the battle, and was replaced by Živojin Mišić. He commanded I Army in 1918, which broke the enemy lines and advanced deep into the occupied territory. He received the title of vojvoda on September 26, 1918 for his contribution during the war.

    [img height=240]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/32/VojvodaPetarBojovic.jpg” />

    Serdar Janko Vukotić, (Serbian: сердарЈанко Вукотић; 18 February 1866 in Čevo, Cetinje – 4 February 1927) was a general in the armies of the Principality and Kingdom of Montenegro in the Balkan Wars and World War I and later Vojvoda (Field Marshal) in Army of Kingdom of Serbs Croats and Slovenes . He also served as Montenegro's Minister of Defence in periods 1905-1907, 1911–1912 and 1913–1915 and as the Prime Minister of Montenegro 1913-1915. He is famous for commanding the Montenegrin Army during the Battle of Mojkovac. On Orthodox Christmas Eve and Christmas, Montenegrins defeated much stonger Austro-Hungarian forces and by this protected retreat of Serbian Army to Corfu via Albania.

    [img height=240]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/72/Brigadir_Janko_Vukotic.jpg” />

    #357724

    Anonymous

    [table]
    [tr]
    [td][img height=200]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/11/V%C3%A1clav_Havel_cut_out.jpg” />[/td]
    [td]    [/td]
    [td]Václav Havel

    A Czech playwright, essayist, poet, dissident and politician. Havel was the ninth and last president of Czechoslovakia (1989–1992) and the first president of the Czech Republic (1993–2003). He wrote more than 20 plays and numerous non-fiction works, translated internationally. Havel was one of the signatories of the Charter 77 manifesto, a founding signatory of the Prague Declaration on European Conscience and Communism, and a council member of the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation. Havel received many recognitions, including the United States Presidential Medal of Freedom, the Gandhi Peace Prize, the Philadelphia Liberty Medal, the Order of Canada, the freedom medal of the Four Freedoms Award, and the Ambassador of Conscience Award.[/td]
    [/tr]
    [/table]

    #357725

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    [table]
    [tr]
    [td][img height=200]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/11/V%C3%A1clav_Havel_cut_out.jpg” />[/td]
    [td]    [/td]
    [td]Václav Havel

    A Czech playwright, essayist, poet, dissident and politician. Havel was the ninth and last president of Czechoslovakia (1989–1992) and the first president of the Czech Republic (1993–2003). He wrote more than 20 plays and numerous non-fiction works, translated internationally. Havel was one of the signatories of the Charter 77 manifesto, a founding signatory of the Prague Declaration on European Conscience and Communism, and a council member of the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation. Havel received many recognitions, including the United States Presidential Medal of Freedom, the Gandhi Peace Prize, the Philadelphia Liberty Medal, the Order of Canada, the freedom medal of the Four Freedoms Award, and the Ambassador of Conscience Award.[/td]
    [/tr]
    [/table]

    Václav Havel, a Slav supporting the killing of other Slavs, because of irredentistic policies of non-Slavs, is not someone I would consider a Slavic hero.

    Didn't know you are a Czech, you really go wide, don't you. I see you became a Bosniak, Yugoslav ain't IN anymore? :)

    #357726

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Václav Havel, a Slav supporting the killing of other Slavs, because of irredentistic policies of non-Slavs, is not someone I would consider a Slavic hero.

    I don't remember him supporting the killing of other Slavs? And these are national heroes. He is considered a national hero, apparently, for being a dissident in Communist Czechoslovakia. But if he is considered a villain, then I'll take him off.

    Quote:
    Didn't know you are a Czech, you really go wide, don't you. I see you became a Bosniak, Yugoslav ain't IN anymore? :)

    Czech? I'm not Czech because I post about Czechs. I posted stuff about Belarusians as well, does that make me Belarusian? ;D

    #357727

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I don't remember him supporting the killing of other Slavs? And these are national heroes. He is considered a national hero, apparently, for being a dissident in Communist Czechoslovakia. But if he is considered a villain, then I'll take him off.

    Czech? I'm not Czech because I post about Czechs. I posted stuff about Belarusians as well, does that make me Belarusian? ;D

    The topic states: Present your national heros, people who, by your opinion, done most for your nation.


      [li]You posting Czechs, could be that you are a Czech. [/li]

    He is not a villain, and was surely a capable Czech politician, but he did support the bombing and killing of Slavs (unarmed civilians, not the army), as well as burning and genocide of Slavs living in their own country by a foreign non-Slavic force. Not someone I would consider a hero in the spirit of Slavdom.

    #357728

    Anonymous
    #357729

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    The topic states: Present your national heros, people who, by your opinion, done most for your nation.


      [li]You posting Czechs, could be that you are a Czech. [/li]

    Well Makedonec posted Alexander the Great, and Lubomire posted some Czechs, so I thought it was ok.

    Quote:
    He is not a villain, and was surely a capable Czech politician, but he did support the bombing and killing of Slavs (unarmed civilians, not the army), as well as burning and genocide of Slavs living in their own country by a foreign non-Slavic force. Not someone I would consider a hero in the spirit of Slavdom.

    Pentaz posted Ante Starcevic, a man who seemed to dislike Serbs. I figured it would be alright to post about Havel since he is a national hero for the Czechs. I never heard of him advocating genocide, explain to me why he is anti-slav. So he didn't want to kick out Germans in his country, that's not exactly anti-slav.

    #357730

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Well Makedonec posted Alexander the Great, and Lubomire posted some Czechs, so I thought it was ok.

    Pentaz posted Ante Starcevic, a man who seemed to dislike Serbs. I figured it would be alright to post about Havel since he is a national hero for the Czechs. I never heard of him advocating genocide, explain to me why he is anti-slav. So he didn't want to kick out Germans in his country, that's not exactly anti-slav.

    Inter-Slavic quarell is one thing, I may support the Czechs against the Slovaks or vice versa, but I would never support Hungarians against the Slovaks, since it is not a Slavic thing to do, in my opinion that is. Havel did exactly this, not only Havel of course, but we are talking about Havel.

    Did you ever hear anyone advocating genocide? If you openly support actions which goals are to erase a Slavic ethnicity from their own territory, you are supporting genocide. Calling it a necessary action to provide peace and stability to the region is a nice way to put it, since you gain peace by defeating the one, and erasing the other, why he have chosen to support the non-Slavic side of the conflict, is open for discussion.

    – When Lubomir was born, it was one nation, for Alexander the Great, well the same like me posting Constantine the Great, he was there but not one of us.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 114 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Slavorum

6 User(s) Online Join Server
  • Petko (the pet store)
  • ▽eurus▽
  • ☭Lil Commie☭
  • Drizzt
  • Shnickstara89
  • LCaine