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  • #346400

    Anonymous

    Announcing a new cartography website, "Historical Maps of the Hapsburg
    Empire" or MAPIRE.

    http://mapire.staatsarchiv.at/en/

    The purpose of this site is to publish historical maps of the Habsburg
    Empire and the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy. The maps are overlaid onto
    GoogleEarth. The level of detail is amazing! The map for Galicia is
    from the "Second (also known as Franciscan) Military Survey, 1806-1869"
    collection.

    Mission

    The purpose of this site is to publish historical maps of the Habsburg Empire and the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy. This magnificent archival content is world-wide unique in sense of antiqueness, resolution and artistical implementation. Our main goal is to create an international collaboration to make this content available to the world in a common interface using the latest GIS technologies.

    Additional information from the site:

    There are two types of maps of that time period. One of them are the military surveys which are typically scaled 1 to 28.800 and the more detailed cadastral maps which are scaled 1 to 2.880, both of them covering the entire territory. The original manuscript map sheets of the military surveys can be found in the Austrian National Archives, the ones of the cadastral maps in the (national, regional) archives of the successor states.

    The Second (also known as Franciscan) Military Survey is a masterpiece of the map series representing the territory of Austro-Hungarian Empire. It is outstanding in quality regarding its data content, drawing features and aesthetic appearance. Although the series is not uniform in its content and in its implementation due to the extended period of time of the mapping (1806–1869), according to recent experience in its present-day usage, its map sheets are fairly well applicable even today.

    For a long time, the map sheets treasured in the archives were only available for a closed group of professionals of military cartography. In Hungary from the beginning of the 1990s their existence and, more importantly, the advantageous characteristics of the maps became known for the specialists of various branches like archeology, hydrology, forestry and nature protection. A number of reproductions of sheets portraying the most important territories, mainly as black and white copies, started to be distributed. The excellent geodetic basis of the cartographic work made possible to compare the recent and former topographic features in specific study areas with acceptable accuracy. …

    The available territories to choose from: (Map is interactive on the site)

    [img width=700 height=467]http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/819/rdny.jpg”/>

    #430300

    Anonymous

    Great fing Karpivna! :D The maps have really good detail, it's fun to look at the area where I live and see how the places were called in German 150 years ago. Despite being written in German, it's so obvious the names are Slovene.

    #430301

    Anonymous

    Yeah, well, ok. But due to this map, some parts conquered by Austria are not presented here. I'll give an example of my 2nd nearest city – Biała Podlaska.

    1525 – 1569: Grand Duchy of Lithuania (in personal union with Crown of the Kingdom of Poland);
    1569 – 1795: Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth; Grand Duchy of Lithuania;
    1795 – 1804: Habsburg Monarchy;
    1804 – 1809: Austrian Empire;

    1809 – 1815: Duchy of Warsaw (French protectorate);
    1815 – 1918: Russian Empire;
    1918 – 1939: Second Polish Republic;
    1939 – 1945: the Third Reich; General Government;
    1945 – 1952: Rzeczpospolita;
    1952 – 1989: People's Republic of Poland;
    1989 – now: Rzeczpospolita.

    So, due to this Biała Podlaska was a part of Austria for a while :p

    [img width=700 height=549]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/ae/Rzeczpospolita_Rozbiory_4.png/765px-Rzeczpospolita_Rozbiory_4.png” />

    It looked this way after last partition of Poland. Biała is a bit on the west from Brest.

    But yeah… then Russians came <_<

    #430302

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Yeah, well, ok. But due to this map, some parts conquered by Austria are not presented here. I'll give an example of my 2nd nearest city – Biała Podlaska.

    1525 – 1569: Grand Duchy of Lithuania (in personal union with Crown of the Kingdom of Poland);
    1569 – 1795: Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth; Grand Duchy of Lithuania;
    1795 – 1804: Habsburg Monarchy;
    1804 – 1809: Austrian Empire;

    1809 – 1815: Duchy of Warsaw (French protectorate);
    1815 – 1918: Russian Empire;
    1918 – 1939: Second Polish Republic;
    1939 – 1945: the Third Reich; General Government;
    1945 – 1952: Rzeczpospolita;
    1952 – 1989: People's Republic of Poland;
    1989 – now: Rzeczpospolita.

    So, due to this Biała Podlaska was a part of Austria for a while :p

    [img width=700 height=549]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/ae/Rzeczpospolita_Rozbiory_4.png/765px-Rzeczpospolita_Rozbiory_4.png” />

    It looked this way after last partition of Poland. Biała is a bit on the west from Brest.

    But yeah… then Russians came <_<

    Perhaps because it was issued much after that years (though it says 1806 – 1869). It is also false in the matter of Illyria, which was existing 1816-1849 and the Küstenland was part of it, not a special unit like this map is showing. So far I checked only Styria (mostly my only point of interest on the map since I live there) and there everything is fine, afterall the border didn't change until 1918.

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