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  • #345702

    Anonymous

    I'd like to see Ukraine in the EU. I would. Sorry to see Moscow using strong-arm tactics on this issue. I don't see any mass hysteria over Ukrainians harmed by using Ukrainian products, so I have to agree with the critics that something else must be behind this restriction.

    http://www.euronews.com/2013/08/17/new-russian-import-restrictions-pile-pressure-on-ukraine/

    17/08/13

    New Russian import restrictions pile pressure on Ukraine

    Ukraine’s Prime Minister, Mykola Azarov, has pledged to do everything possible to bring an end to border chaos caused by new Russian import restrictions.

    Some claim the controls imposed by Moscow on scores of Ukrainian products are an attempt to dissuade its neighbour from turning towards Europe – and away from its former Soviet ally.

    In an interview, Azarov said there were difficulties, which he thought were linked to the creation of a Customs Union, referring to a Moscow-led alliance which Russia wants Ukraine to join.

    Last month, Russia banned confectionery imports from Ukraine, citing safety concerns. It came after President Vladimir Putin failed to persuade his counterpart Viktor Yanukovich to rethink his European move.

    Meanwhile, Russian health officials say they want reassurances over products.

    “As soon as we are persuaded that everything is ok, we will cancel our controls,” said Gennady Onishchenko, Russia’s Chief Public Health Official.

    “If the laboratories of Ukraine provide us with guarantees that the products comply with the rules, we will be able to let the goods to pass through the border.”

    Putin and Yanukovich reportedly discussed the issue by phone on Friday.

    Business experts say the latest import restrictions could cost Ukrainian companies up to 1.8 billion euros in losses.

    #420721

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I'd like to see Ukraine in the EU. I would. Sorry to see Moscow using strong-arm tactics on this issue. I don't see any mass hysteria over Ukrainians harmed by using Ukrainian products, so I have to agree with the critics that something else must be behind this restriction.

    http://www.euronews.com/2013/08/17/new-russian-import-restrictions-pile-pressure-on-ukraine/

    Whatever your grievances with Russia may be, EU is not the answer. It is probably the worst thing that could happen to Ukraine. I really hope other Ukrainians do not think as you do. Although, I see you're also American. This probably explains your mentality towards such things.

    #420722

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Whatever your grievances with Russia may be, EU is not the answer. It is probably the worst thing that could happen to Ukraine. I really hope other Ukrainians do not think as you do. Although, I see you're also American. This probably explains your mentality towards such things.

    I don't actually have any particular grievances with Russia, and ideally, Russia and Ukraine as allies makes sense, as they are connected culturally and ethnically. However, from what I've been reading, it seems Ukraine always gets stepped on by the Russian boot. I don't have any particular allegiance to the European Union, but I don't see any other option if Ukraine wants to become economically strong and a real player in the global marketplace.

    Maybe you can elaborate on why EU would be the worst possible thing for Ukraine? I'd certainly love to hear other viewpoints on this issue. I am very new to studying current politics and trends in Ukraine/Russia/Eastern Europe.  So, your thoughts would be appreciated.  :)

    #420723

    Anonymous

    Yanukovich is where he is only because of Russian help from Putin and Russian oligarchs and the Russians are looking for payback.  Seems like most Ukrainian politicians are all in the same circle of oligachs and all steal from the people.  Ukraine is a land with resources and an educated population.  They should be well off and have a stable and prosperous middle class.  If I'm not mistaken, isn't Yanukovich one of the richest men in Ukraine and didn't he only recently even learn Ukrainian?

    I would worry that an EU membership would open the floodgates to corrupt sell off schemes of state resources and important sectors like banking and communications.  They will be sold to rich western Europeans at a cheap price and the costs to Ukrainians to use these services will skyrocket. 

    Drawing closer to Russia also poses the problem of more oligarchs and returning to a semi dependency to Russia. 

    #420724

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Whatever your grievances with Russia may be, EU is not the answer. It is probably the worst thing that could happen to Ukraine. I really hope other Ukrainians do not think as you do. Although, I see you're also American. This probably explains your mentality towards such things.

    You never explained why the E.U. is the worst thing that can happen for Ukraine.  Instead you wrote it off as basically lack of understanding on her part because she is an American.  ::)

    By the way , I agree with you about the E.U.

    Also, welcome back Slavija.  It's good to see you again. Where have you been? ;D

    #420725

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I'd like to see Ukraine in the EU. I would. Sorry to see Moscow using strong-arm tactics on this issue. I don't see any mass hysteria over Ukrainians harmed by using Ukrainian products, so I have to agree with the critics that something else must be behind this restriction.

    The EU will not accept Ukraine unless it's ready. To be ready a country needs to solve many of its social and economic problems. It wasn't long ago I was comparing Ukraine to other  Slavic countries. Ukraine is  not doing well. The other thing Ukraine is not an under 10 million nation whose problems EU nations can help to fix quickly and efficiently. Ukraine is a 45millions nation whose people have different opinions about the future of Ukraine.  So, entering the EU zone is not as simple as it may appear.  If there was a possibility for Ukraine entering the EU zone in the next 5 years, which will be someday, then Russia won't be adopting the policies it is adopting at the moment. As stands Russia is doing what it's doing best – some politicians are openly suggesting to Ukrainian companies selling their products to EU, as the country doesn't need to be a member of EU to trade with EU member countries.

    #420726

    Anonymous

    Christmas List:

    Slavija
    rodv
    Xekoslav
    Sviatogor

    ;D

    Thank you all for the additional information and your views on the issue of Ukraine and the EU.  I see I have much more to learn! So, I think I shall table my assessment that EU is best for Ukraine until further notice!  ;) Ukraine seems so split to me: Russian-leaning to the east of Kiev and Ukrainian Nationalist in the Western parts, with great corruption in its government and judicial branches. Oh, my poor Ukraine.  :'(

    #420727

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Oh, my poor Ukraine.  :'(

    Economical and political isolation  is not an ideal situation as smaller states have less bargaining power.  Belarus and Russia had 'milk war' few years ago. People in Belarus believe Russians wanted more control over Belarusian dairy industry. Currently, Ukrainians want to limit Belarusian dairy products despite the products have good reputation in Ukraine and Russia, as it's hurting Ukrainian producers.  Russia temporarily stopped buying Belarusian machineries because some Russian companies wanted to buy some shares in reputable Belarusian companies. The negotiation over prices on energy sources which cost the states billions of dollars never end. Despite the arguments the countries are still trading. I am sure Russia and Ukraine will settle their differences on Ukrainian products soon. :)

    #420728

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    You never explained why the E.U. is the worst thing that can happen for Ukraine.  Instead you wrote it off as basically lack of understanding on her part because she is an American.  ::)

    Come on. Anyone who writes the following:

    Quote:
    I'd like to see Ukraine in the EU. I would.

    Sounds sure of themselves. Sentences like these imply that the writer already has knowledge about something they sound so damn certain of. I never wrote anything about a lack of understanding, because I didn't realise there was a lack of understanding. I wrote that her mentality on this matter was because she's American. The media there is pro-Western and liberal, and so I figured her way of thinking was due to this, nothing to do with a lack of understanding. As I said, someone that sounds so sure of a statement imples to the reader they already know about it and have made their choice, picked their side. So, yes, I figured she was well educated on the matter to be making such a bold statement about it.

    Also, if you notice, there were no questions asked in the original post. There was only statements made. Someone that requires things explained to them would ask a question such as: "Well this news sounds very bad for Ukraine. Is joining the EU a better option?" Then we would know this person doesn't know much on the topic (which is fine) and would explain it to them. But saying something as strong as "I want Ukraine in the EU" is pretty much a direct provocation to many members of this site, as they are generally anti-EU, as well as implying that the writer knows what the EU is and supports the idea, as I've mentioned. So before jumping in and being the white knight, read what is clearly in front of you. You're not stupid.

    Besides, I didn't see you jumping in to explain anything to her, when you actually knew she needed explaining. Even after you said you agree, I'm sure she would have liked to know why. All you did was accuse me of not, but I didn't know she needed any explaining. But of course, I'm the bad guy.  ::)

    Hypocrisy I smell.

    Quote:
    By the way , I agree with you about the E.U.

    Also, welcome back Slavija.  It's good to see you again. Where have you been? ;D

    Thanks. I've been busy finishing up some things and taking care of some business. I'm not going to be on as often as before, but I'll try to get on here at least once a week.

    Back to the matter at hand: Any sane person would agree. And I saw your anti-EU posts before Croatia joined, so I know we've got the same mind with this. Although:

    Quote:
    Christmas List:

    Slavija
    rodv
    Xekoslav
    Sviatogor

    Since I am off the Christmas list, I don't feel inclined to explain anything  ;)

    Maybe you can tell her the evils of the EU and the Faustian Pact which is required of a nation upon joining, since you are so well versed in it and hate the fact your own country is now a member in good standing of that accursed union.

    #420729

    Anonymous

    Difficult time for Ukraine is reality now. Ukraine as a country and Ukrainians as a people of Ukraine should make the choice and we should stay and waiting, nothing more. I am sad that Russian Goverment can't just stay and watching for Ukrainian activities. It is Ukrainian people who should decide to where they will go. And I know that it is not simple decision, there are many opinions on this issue in Ukraine. I don't want my country to claim: "Ukraine, what are you doing? Come back to home." It is not our deal it is business of Ukrainian people.
    But unfortunately the more sad thing here is that Russian people are getting all this as "Ukrainians are turnig their back upon us". Yes, silly thoughts but they exist because all activities of Ukrainian Goverment will be taking as activities of ordinary people. Nevertheless I don't want to see pressure from Moscow over Ukraine.
    By the way as I am not mistaken Custom Union is offering quite good and profitable options to Ukraine.

    #420730

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    So, I think I shall table my assessment that EU is best for Ukraine until further notice!  ;)

    Many Ukrainians are sharing your opinion. You are not alone. :) As for me, it'd be ideal to be an equal partner with the EU and Russia. But that'd be too much to ask of the Russian government.  All of a sudden many Ukrainian products are safety concern?  That Poor Russian Chief Public Health Official Gennady Onishchenko announcing it. The Russian government is doing it not for the first time. The issue over imports resulted from the fact that Ukraine is ready to sign Association Agreement with the EU. I am not sure what it means for Ukraine in economic terms.Probably not much to begin with. I think the agreement is prepared to keep Ukraine away from the Customs Union led by Moscow. Ukraine is also actively searching for alternative suppliers of energy sources. Romania, Hungary, Slovakia and Poland are the countries from which Ukraine may buy natural gas back. It's unbelievable.

    There're some good news for people in favour of the EU. :)

    The European Union and Ukraine have initialled an Association Agreement as part of a joint effort to further strengthen the ties and bonds between them.

    Even though the Association Agreement has not yet been signed, the EU aims to carry out a number of information activities so as to provide a clear and considered insight into what exactly is contained in the Association Agreement.

    This will help in the context of any discussion and debate that may occur in the future on the Agreement.

    Activities will include simple factsheets and a more comprehensive guide to the Association Agreement.

    What is in the Association Agreement?

    The Association Agreement is a pioneering document: it is the first agreement based on political association between the EU and any of the Eastern Partnership countries, and is unprecedented in its breadth (number of areas covered) and depth (detail of commitments and timelines).

    The key parts focus on support to core reforms, economic recovery and growth, and governance and sector cooperation in areas such as energy, transport and environment protection, industrial cooperation, social development and protection, equal rights, consumer protection, education, youth, and cultural cooperation.

    The Agreement also puts a strong emphasis on values and principles: democracy and the rule of law, respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms, good governance, a market economy and sustainable development.

    There will be enhanced cooperation in foreign and security policy and energy.

    It includes a Deep and Comprehensive Free Trade Area – this will go further than classic free trade areas, as it will both open up markets but also address competitiveness issues and the steps needed to meet EU standards and trade on EU markets.

    The Agreement will also highlight Justice, Freedom & Security issues which also include provisions on mobility.

    EU – Ukraine Relations

    Relations between the EU and Ukraine are currently based on the Partnership and Co-operation Agreement (PCA) which entered into force in 1998. At the Paris Summit in 2008 the leaders of the EU and Ukraine agreed that an Association Agreement should be the successor agreement to the Partnership and Co-operation Agreement.

    The EU-Ukraine Association Agreement is the first of a new generation of Association Agreements with Eastern Partnership countries. Negotiations of this comprehensive, ambitious and innovative Agreement between the EU and Ukraine were launched in March 2007.

    In February 2008, following confirmation of Ukraine’s WTO membership, the EU and Ukraine launched negotiations on a Deep and Comprehensive Free Trade Area (DCFTA) as a core element of the Association Agreement.

    At the 15th Ukraine-EU Summit of 19 December 2011, the EU leaders and President Yanukovych noted that a common understanding on the text of the Association Agreement was reached.

    On 30 of March 2012 the chief negotiators of the European Union and Ukraine initialled the text of the Association Agreement, which included provisions on the establishment of a DCFTA as an integral part. In this context, chief trade negotiators from both sides initialled the DCFTA part of the Agreement on 19 July 2012.

    Both EU and Ukraine expressed their common commitment to undertake further technical steps, required to prepare conclusion of the Association Agreement.

    Source: http://eeas.europa.eu/top_stories/2012/140912_ukraine_en.htm

    #420731

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    By the way as I am not mistaken Custom Union is offering quite good and profitable options to Ukraine.

    It does in return for political favours. This is one of the reason the Baltic states are trying very hard to stay independent of Russian energy sources willing to pay the highest prices for natural gas in Europe. In case of Belarus, if the country wants energy sources at discounted prices, then the state owned gas transportation through which gas is transferred in EU  should be sold to the Russian gas company. If you want to sell your heavy trucks on our market, then sell some stocks of your profitable companies. Belarusians worked very hard their companies profitable. In fairness to the Russians, they sold  a lot of gas and oil to Belarus at discounted prices worth billion of dollars, without which it'd be difficult to stay competitive for a production driven economy. 

    Customs Union will return to Russia $400 billions, 16 billions to Belarus and Kazakhstan by 2015 according to some sources. . AFAIK. some countries are getting more from the EU without being bullied by Onishchenko over safety concerns.

    #420732

    Anonymous

    Ukraine seem to be the proverbial wishbone that east and west kee pulling apart.

    #420733

    Anonymous

    Its not full EU membership. That won't happen for a decade.

    After so many years what kind of Ukrainian wants another Russian umbrella over their head?

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