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  • #343945

    Anonymous
    [img width=700 height=473]http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-WKjKBuXkp0k/T5KjkY5VNUI/AAAAAAAAC2Y/3GxfMfPtEJk/s1600/2011-01-08_23-34-46.jpg”/>

    [size=12pt]In Polish and Slavic[/size] cultural tradition an unmarried woman would wear her hair in a braid, this is still obvious in many Slavic nations among young women. While a married woman would cover her hair and again you can still see this all throughout Eastern, Central, and Balkan Europe specifically among older women even in none Slavic nations like Romania. What I'm wondering is if there is a similar wedding tradition in other Slavic nations like there is in Poland where the transition between the braided hair and the head covering happens, maybe even just traditionally. I was speaking to my Croatian friend and she says Croats have the same tradition at weddings. In Poland it's called Oczepiny.

    A bit about it for anyone who is interested:

    Hair Braiding – Night before wedding
    The night before the wedding, the bride's mother and her female relatives undo her one long maidenly braid (traditionally worn by unmarried Polish girls) and braid her hair into two braids while singing songs. The two new braids symbolize the new step that the young woman is about to take. Historically, the bride would wear her maidenly braids throughout the wedding ceremony. Afterwards, her bridesmaids would undo them to symbolize her bridal passage.

    Oczepiny
    Oczepiny is the name of the Polish capping ceremony. In this ceremony, the bride's veil or
    wreath is removed and the traditional cap of a married woman is placed on her head. The
    ceremony remains very popular among Polish couples as well as couples of Polish descent
    throughout the world.
    The oczepiny is performed several hours into the wedding reception, often at midnight.  The maid
    of honor or another unmarried woman leads the bride to a bench or chair to sit – or, traditionally,
    to a dough bin covered with a sheepskin (a fertility symbol), woolly side up.  Lights are dimmed,
    and sometimes the married women in attendance hold lit candles.  The maid of honor unfastens
    the veil or garland from the bride's hair while other unmarried women stand close to the bride,
    singing traditional songs for the occasion, some of which are quite bawdy.  Traditionally the
    bride's hair might be cut at this time as well.  When the wreath or veil falls, the unmarried
    women and girls circle the bride, dancing and singing traditional songs of farewell to the woman
    who is no longer one of them. 
    Polish brides did not typically wear veils until the 19th century, but girls and unmarried women
    did wear wreaths made of herbs and flowers for all special occasions, including their weddings.
    Married women did not wear such wreaths, so the wreath was an important piece and symbol of
    maidenhood.  Now most brides wear veils instead of wreaths, and it is their veils that are the
    object of the unmarried women's ritual.  Some Poles have found room in the oczepiny for the
    foreign custom of tossing the bouquet:  the bride tosses her veil into a crowd of unmarried
    women in order to predict who will marry next.
    Until recently, the typical married Polish woman wore a cap – in Polish, a czepek – most of the
    time. The style of this cap varied greatly from region to region.
    After the bride loses her wreath or veil during the oczepiny, the married women and the
    unmarried women might fight playfully over which group the bride belongs to.  But in time the
    unmarried women let the married women surround the bride.  One of the married women
    attempts to cover the bride's head with a czepek.  This czepek was traditionally made by the
    bride's godmother for the new wife to wear on special occasions.  The bride resists being capped
    for a few minutes, but eventually she gives in.  This remains an important ritual despite the fact
    that the typical bride will not wear a czepek from day to day in married life.  Once the bride
    consents to wear the czepek, the married women introduce her as one of their own by singing
    another song.  Until recently, it was only after the bride was capped that she was considered a
    married woman.

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    [img width=700 height=469]http://www.ziemia-cieszynska.pl/files/F1010005.JPG”/>

    [img width=700 height=525]http://www.wdk-kielce.pl/pliki_jpg/349.jpg?PHPSESSID=36d5484fa7126aa1c9ca21627b24f0af”/>

    [img width=700 height=446]http://www.regiony.kulturaludowa.pl/editor/xinha/plugins/ImageManager/editor_images/regiony/kurpie/wesele_kurpiowskie.jpg”/>

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    #394563

    Anonymous

    We actually have a thread about hair traditions.  Though this isn't about hair completely…Should we merge the two threads anyway? If needing a quick link, it's here.

    Great info, btw! I know that the wreath and braid are common for unmarried women and caps and no braids are more common for married women. I'm not sure about the actual ceremony of such role changes, though. I'd definitely be curious to know whether other cultures follow this also. :)

    #394564

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    We actually have a thread about hair traditions.  Should an admin merge the two threads and keep the info in one place?

    Great info, btw!!

    Oh sorry! I didn't know, that would be great. Thanks by the way. :)

    #394565

    Anonymous

    I edited the post.. and it's all good!  I wasn't sure if it would be fitting for a thread about hair traditions or not. It could go there, but isn't 100% hair hair related. If that makes sense. LOL

    #394566

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I edited the post.. and it's all good!  I wasn't sure if it would be fitting for a thread about hair traditions or not. It could go there, but isn't 100% hair hair related. If that makes sense. LOL

    No, I get what you mean. It's more about the wedding tradition than the actual braids and head covering.

    Lovely hair and braids in that thread by the way. I'm envious because it looks way nicer with long blonde hair than with my short brunette hair. :P

    #394567

    Anonymous

    That's more of what I thought about afterward.  I'm not sure if we have a thread about wedding traditions.  Could be a great topic. :)

    And thanks. It's taken me a bit to grow my hair out, but it's getting there. Longest part is to the hips. My goal is upper thigh. :)

    #394568

    Anonymous

    In Slovakia we call this ceremony čepčenie. There is even a website about it – http://www.cepcenie.sk.

    I haven't heard about "two braids" tradition here though.

    imageimage
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    [img width=700 height=466]http://hrdlicky.sk/wp-content/gallery/cepcenie-page/cepcenie.jpg” />
    [img height=500]http://www.dobos.revuca.net/gemer/horare011.jpg” />

    Traditional

    Nowaday (sometimes)

    During the ceremony was bride wearing on her hat wedding hat called parta. All around Slovakia were varions kinds of these, mostly made from flowers and/or long ribbons.

    [img height=500]http://www.ludovakultura.sk/fileadmin/images/hesla_full/parta.jpg” />
    [img width=700 height=510]http://www.ludovakultura.sk/fileadmin/images/hesla_full/rozmarin1.jpg” />
    [img height=500]http://static.sashe.sk/photos/c/1/3/5/1/c-1351189_528f9e6ce2.jpg” />
    image
    [img height=500]http://feminity.zoznam.sk/g/858764/pic/2/c/f/d/vicemiss-denisa-krajcovicova-v-kroji-329390.jpg” />
    image

    And there were various kinds of "čepce", too.

    [img width=485 height=700]http://www.ludovakultura.sk/fileadmin/images/hesla_full/cepiec2.jpg” />
    [img height=500]http://www.easterneuropeanart.com/Inv/Images7/7691/g.JPG” />
    [img height=500]http://fotky.sme.sk/foto/128973/v-kroji?type=v&x=650&y=971″ />
    [img height=500]http://www.velkekozmalovce.sk/portals_pictures/i_000422/i_422651.jpg” />
    image
    [img height=500]http://sphotos-b.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/183803_10150250592521992_5045531_n.jpg” />

    #394569

    Anonymous

    Yeah, right this čepčenie can be seen at most Slovak weddings nowadays – folkloric as well as modern ones. I'm a lucky owner of few embroidered caps (4-5 pieces I think) which are rather rare in my village.

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    [img width=700 height=466]http://www.svadobna-fotografka.sk/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/234.jpg” />

    [img width=700 height=467]http://www.svadobna-fotografka.sk/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/293.jpg” />

    [img width=700 height=464]http://www.carnica.sk/Fotky/Vystupka/2010/Svadba/7.jpg” />

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    #394570

    Anonymous

    TS yes the braid tradition is almost identical in Ukraine.

    Quote:

    During the ceremony was bride wearing on her hat wedding hat called parta. All around Slovakia were varions kinds of these, mostly made from flowers and/or long ribbons.

    [img height=500]http://www.ludovakultura.sk/fileadmin/images/hesla_full/parta.jpg” />

    In Ukraine, especially in Western Ukraine with Hutsuls, there is a type of head dress called a Bavnytsia. The embroidery is different but the head dress itself looks the exact same.

    image

    #394571

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    TS yes the braid tradition is almost identical in Ukraine.

    In Ukraine, especially in Western Ukraine with Hutsuls, there is a type of head dress called a Bavnytsia. The embroidery is different but the head dress itself looks the exact same.

    Well picture of parta you linked back is from region Turiec, which is in North-Western Slovakia, thus in no way can be based on Bavnytsia nor Bavnytsia can be based on parta from Turiec. I don't find them that similar, because this kind of parta often miss its top.

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