• This topic has 9 voices and 18 replies.
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #342355

    Anonymous

    [table][tr]
    [td][img height=190]http://www.rkud-pelagic.org/wp-content/uploads/2008/03/hercegovina.JPG”/>[/td]
    [td][img height=190]http://skd.izvor.free.fr/NOSNJE_muske_dj_uranak.jpg”/>[/td]
    [td][img height=190]http://www.argophilia.com/news/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/kozarsko-kolo.png”/>[/td][/tr][/table]

    The clamor singing is a very distinctive part of Serbian old Slavic heritage. It spread throught the southern peninsula in the course of the Serb migrations. We can find this art of singing in almost all places where Serbs live, or used to live, from eastern Herzegowina to Lika in Croatia. Today it's an important characteristic of the Krajisniks (the Serbs of Krajina).

    It originated from the Serb highlanders of the south. In their strive to resemble the howling of the wolves, they developed an art of clamor singing (srb. Pevanje iz vika). It was sung by at least two persons, that synchronised their vocals achieving one complementary vocal.

    The Ojkaca which developed out of this clamor singing is known as the way the Krajisnik cries, laughs and breathes. The name originates from the syllable "Oj".

    #366348

    Anonymous

    It's a shame this kind of singing is disappearing.

    #366349

    Anonymous

    Da li je ovo ojkanje?

    Bora Drljaca – Nema raja

    #366350

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    It's a shame this kind of singing is disappearing.

    Disappearing? I didn't notice that. In my hometown men sing this all the time. :D

    #366351

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Da li je ovo ojkanje?

    Bora Drljaca – Nema raja

    Yeah

    #366352

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Disappearing? I didn't notice that. In my hometown men sing this all the time. :D

    Young people are not interested in it at all, they prefer listening to eminem and turbofolk or whatever. When my generation reaches old age, not only will their children not know what ojkaca is, there will only be a handful of people who actually know how to sing it.

    #366353

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Young people are not interested in it at all, they prefer listening to eminem and turbofolk or whatever. When my generation reaches old age, not only will their children not know what ojkaca is, there will only be a handful of people who actually know how to sing it.

    I guess. When my and my friends go to the towns and villages its not all that uncommon to hear and people seem to enjoy it. I think you do have a point. Modern generation and media see it as 'seljacko'. When I cook I listen to Radio Banovina on satellite and folk music there is still alive and well. :D

    #366354

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I guess. When my and my friends go to the towns and villages its not all that uncommon to hear and people seem to enjoy it. I think you do have a point. Modern generation and media see it as 'seljacko'. When I cook I listen to Radio Banovina on satellite and folk music there is still alive and well. :D

    I think my view may be a bit distorted because I live in Australia, so I'm not exposed to the Serbian culture much at all.
    Still, I think it sounds pretty cool and people should definitely be interested in it :P

    #366355

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I think my view may be a bit distorted because I live in Australia, so I'm not exposed to the Serbian culture much at all.
    Still, I think it sounds pretty cool and people should definitely be interested in it :P

    Serbian or Croatian , it's not definitive. It's more of a regional curiosity that extends from Croat, Serb, and even Bosniak communities from Central Bosnia , throughout all of Hercegovina , Western BiH , and Lika-Dalmatia. In the right atmosphere young people love traditional singing even if they tend to 'modernize' it a bit with more upbeat instruments. The soul in the music is still present. For example the young crowd loving and upbeat version of traditional music :

    Mate Bulic – Pjevaj mi pjevaj sokole , Golubice bijela , Preko Kapele

    " Nema sto pricat , nabolje pivat"

    #366356

    Anonymous

    I remember when my first cousin was marrying we went to Bar (coastal town) to take his wife. I still can see a shock on the faces of a poor sea folk when my relatives started singing, lol
    I was also kinda shocked by the fact that they are not accustomed to it since in the "mountains" there is basically no celebration without "Ojkanje"

    #366357

    Anonymous

    This is the beauty of Serbian culture. They preserved their old traditions and I just love this type of singing.

    Godišnji koncert 2010 KUD VSK-6.Rece cica da me zeni – KUD VSK Rorschach

    #366358

    Anonymous

    This is so beautiful. I haven't found this type of singing in any other part of Europe.

    Krajiska Oce caca da me zeni

    KUD Krajina Licki Ojkan UZivo

    #366359

    Anonymous

    btw, Bjelopavlići clan in Montenegro claim that they invented this type of singing, lol
    I honestly think it s older than their clan :)
    maybe it is kinda morbid, but I think that "lelekanje" (mourning singing during funerals) is similar.

    #366360

    Anonymous
    #366361

    Anonymous
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Slavorum

11 User(s) Online Join Server
  • Tujev
  • Lucifer Morningstar
  • Jan Pat II
  • Fia
  • slovborg
  • кошка