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  • #342544

    Anonymous
    #369654

    Anonymous

    Beautiful animals. I hope they survive.

    #369655

    Anonymous

    Stupid OT posts removed. I really don't believe this majestic animals deserve to be insulted.
    Please continue thread in civil fashion. Any further pointless posts will be deleted like last ones.

    #369656

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    beautiful, rare and majestic animal

    This. Żubry are awesome!

    #369657

    Anonymous
    Quote:

    Quote:
    beautiful, rare and majestic animal

    This. Żubry are awesome!

    Indeed! One animal I wish to see in real life.

    #369658

    Anonymous

    Me too. According to wikipedia there are also some of them living in Ukraine, in the south western border regions with Slovakia and the Polish south east. Might have a look there when I go to Ukraine next week since it doesn't seem to be all to far from where my family is living.

    image

    #369659

    Anonymous

    Żubry are also the namesake of a very famous and very Polish vodka and a beer as well.
    [img height=370]http://jbaumgart.files.wordpress.com/2011/09/c5bcubrc3b3wka.jpg?w=600&h=401″/>[img height=370]http://www.bankier.pl/static/att/41000/1708781_2.jpg”/>

    This animal is very particular to the region, Slavs were the only ones not to kill it off completely. We should take care to keep it safe.

    #369660

    Anonymous

    Notice there are no bisons in Russia.
    They are prejudiced against Russian Orthodox language. They live only in areas that are predominantly Greek Catholic, Orthodox brothers stolen from the most righteous faith!
    Bad bisons.

    ;D

    #369661

    Anonymous

    1 day ban Konzervativac.

    #369662

    Anonymous

    Let's start from the beginning  :)

    Białowieża Forest, Eastern Poland, the last habitat of Żubr (wisent) – European bison (Bison bonasus)
    image

    image

    [img width=700 height=525]http://cudaswiata.pl/photos/puszcza_bialowieska01.jpg”/>

    image

    image

    [img width=700 height=525]http://ochronazubra.rdlp-krosno.pl/img/galerie/pubal/_big/piotr_jachimowski.jpg”/>

    [img width=700 height=482]http://www.strykowski.net/zubry/Zubr_-_zdjecie_3532.jpg”/>

    image

    Wisent were hunted to extinction in the wild, but they survived in Białowieża Forest, straddling the border between Belarus and Poland, until the 1920s and have since been reintroduced from captivity into several countries in Eastern Europe, all descendants of the Białowieża or lowland wisent. They are now forest-dwelling. Magnificent creatures!

    #369663

    Anonymous

    The sons of Veles.

    [table]
    [tr]
    [td][img height=300]http://www.wildcattleconservation.org/Pictures/eu-bison/images/eu-bison04.jpg”/>[/td]
    [td][img height=300]http://www.os-popovac.skole.hr/upload/os-popovac/images/static3/876/Image/Klimenko_veles%281%29.jpg”/>[/td]
    [/tr]
    [/table]

    #369664

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Notice there are no bisons in Russia.
    They are prejudiced against Russian Orthodox language. They live only in areas that are predominantly Greek Catholic, Orthodox brothers stolen from the most righteous faith!
    Bad bisons.

    ;D

    HAHAHAHAHAHA! Indeed! Though strange that they have nothing against Belarussian Orthodox language.
    I wonder if they would react in same way as Catholic-speaking Slovak train conductors would if they heard Russian Orthodox language. ;D

    Quote:
    1 day ban Konzervativac.

    What is it with this kid lately? He has only been posting crap here lately.

    Anyway, more info on future of this fine animal:

    image

    Wisent were reintroduced successfully into the wild, beginning in 1951. Białowieża Forest in Poland and Belarus is home to 800 wild wisent. They are also found in forest preserves in the Western Caucasus.

    Free-ranging herds are found in Poland, Lithuania, Belarus, Ukraine, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Latvia, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova (since 2005), and in Spain (since 2010). There are plans to re-introduce two herds in western Germany and in Oostvaardersplassen Nature Reserve in Flevoland (Netherlands). Zoos in 30 countries also have quite a few animals. There were 3,000 individuals (as of 2000), all descended from only 12 individuals. Because of their limited genetic pool, they are considered highly vulnerable to illnesses like foot and mouth disease.

    #369665

    Anonymous
    Quote:

    Quote:
    Notice there are no bisons in Russia.
    They are prejudiced against Russian Orthodox language. They live only in areas that are predominantly Greek Catholic, Orthodox brothers stolen from the most righteous faith!
    Bad bisons.

    ;D

    HAHAHAHAHAHA! Indeed! Though strange that they have nothing against Belarussian Orthodox language.
    I wonder if they would react in same way as Catholic-speaking Slovak train conductors would if they heard Russian Orthodox language. ;D

    In Belarus they also live in areas predominantly inhabited by Catholic Belarusians. Bison have strong anti-Russian Orthodox sentiment, no wonder that people like Wilkolak, Prelja (Polish chauvinists), Zrkadlo (Slovak pro-Western lunatic), MrX and Sokil (Ukrainian chauvinist banderist scum) like them >:(
    Just look at their horns and the pictures Cvetinov posted, these beasts are enemies of Russian Orthodox nation, heathens and devil worshippers!!!  >:( >:(

    ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D

    Quote:
    Anyway, more info on future of this fine animal:

    image

    Wisent were reintroduced successfully into the wild, beginning in 1951. Białowieża Forest in Poland and Belarus is home to 800 wild wisent. They are also found in forest preserves in the Western Caucasus.

    Free-ranging herds are found in Poland, Lithuania, Belarus, Ukraine, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Latvia, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova (since 2005), and in Spain (since 2010). There are plans to re-introduce two herds in western Germany and in Oostvaardersplassen Nature Reserve in Flevoland (Netherlands). Zoos in 30 countries also have quite a few animals. There were 3,000 individuals (as of 2000), all descended from only 12 individuals. Because of their limited genetic pool, they are considered highly vulnerable to illnesses like foot and mouth disease.

    Thanks for posting this information :)
    It would be awesome to have wild bison living in all of Europe again some day.

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