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  • #343708

    Anonymous

    My grandmother is/was from Ivanava in Brest region (near Pinsk) of Belarus. When I asked What is her background she says ''Poleszuki''.

    Her native language is West Polesian dialect which she says is closer Ukrainian language then Belarusian languaue.

    I don't read or write in any Slavic language so finding information is very difficult.

    Her family surnames are Leonchuk and Grischuk

    Does anyone have anymore information on the Polischuќy people of Polesia ?

    regards

    #390337

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    My grandmother is/was from Ivanava in Brest region (near Pinsk) of Belarus. When I asked What is her background she says ''Poleszuki''.

    Her native language is West Polesian dialect which she says is closer Ukrainian language then Belarusian languaue.

    I don't read or write in any Slavic language so finding information is very difficult.

    Her family surnames are Leonchuk and Grischuk

    Does anyone have anymore information on the Polischuќy people of Polesia ?

    regards

    I'm from Brest, my mother is from village which lies in 50 km from Brest. My grandmother was from another village in 10 km from Brest.
    I remember West Polesian dialect very well. It looks similar to Ukrainian, but also has some Belarusian differences. For example: in Ukrainian stork is "leleka", but in West Polesian strok is "busel" as in Belarusian. Also there are some Polish features. But there are no systematic rules, so this dialect can differ in different regions.

    #390338

    Anonymous

    thanks that very interesting :)

    what would you consider your ethnic origins ?

    When i ask my grandmother (she is 89 years old ) what is her origins she says polishuky. its very confusing.

    because all her surnames seem to be ukrainian in origin

    #390339

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    thanks that very interesting :)

    what would you consider your ethnic origins ?

    When i ask my grandmother (she is 89 years old ) what is her origins she says polishuky. its very confusing.

    because all her surnames seem to be ukrainian in origin

    Surnames with ending -uk -yuk seems to be polishuks'. Cause they are met mostly in the northern part of the Ukraine and in the south of Belarus.
    As for my ethnic origin I prefer to call myself belarusian polishuk ) In that case there are ukrainian polishuks and polish polishuks. These difference is the cuase of the last 70 years on my opinion.
    Now polishuks' identity is almost lost. Too bad, but I can not see what can be done to save it. There were some scientists (researches) in 90th who studied polishuki and even there were some attempts to normalize and structure polishuks' dialects. As for today, I didn't heard anything (
    And where are you from?

    #390340

    Anonymous

    interesting. thanks for your opinion :)
    i live in australia. from what my family have told me the west polesian dialect is apart of the ukrainian language with some belarusian influences. my grandmother who was born in a small village just south of yanow poleski (now Ivanava ) and considers herself a Polishchuky from Belarus. I spoke to a family member who lives in Ivanava and she told me all Polishchuks of Belarus are ukrainian in origin but because ukrainian people and belarusian people are so close when it comes to langague and culture following world war 2 many of them have intermarried with Belarusians and the younger generation  consider themself belarusians.

    i found a document online a couple of weeks ago and in 1896 70% of the population in west polesia considered themself as ukrainians the in 1920's 70% considered themself Polishchuk.
    All of my grandmothers surnames are Ukrainian.
    anyway would be amazing to visit the area oneday :) my grandmother has told me so many amazing stories!

    #390341

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    interesting. thanks for your opinion :)
    i live in australia. from what my family have told me the west polesian dialect is apart of the ukrainian language with some belarusian influences. my grandmother who was born in a small village just south of yanow poleski (now Ivanava ) and considers herself a Polishchuky from Belarus. I spoke to a family member who lives in Ivanava and she told me all Polishchuks of Belarus are ukrainian in origin but because ukrainian people and belarusian people are so close when it comes to langague and culture following world war 2 many of them have intermarried with Belarusians and the younger generation  consider themself belarusians.

    i found a document online a couple of weeks ago and in 1896 70% of the population in west polesia considered themself as ukrainians the in 1920's 70% considered themself Polishchuk.
    All of my grandmothers surnames are Ukrainian.
    anyway would be amazing to visit the area oneday :) my grandmother has told me so many amazing stories!

    Well, there are different points of view. Anyway – polishuks have their roots in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, anyway – I studyied the Great Statut of Grand Duchy of Lithuania, and the language in this status was very similiar to Polishuk's dialects. It seems that people from Polesie has saved their origins in theirs' language and culture.
    If you want to come to Belarus, you are welcome ) There are some some difficulties, but everything is surmountable. You'll be welcomed here )

    #390342

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    i found a document online a couple of weeks ago and in 1896 70% of the population in west polesia considered themself as ukrainians the in 1920's 70% considered themself Polishchuk.
    All of my grandmothers surnames are Ukrainian.

    Acctually, it says they speak Little Russian (ie Ukrainian). Census in  Russian Empire was about languages not ethnicity. But anyway difference is small whether they declared to be Ukrainians or as Ukrainian speakers.

    #390343

    Anonymous

    seeing my family in south west Belarus had Ukrainian surnames and spoke a Ukrainian dialect you would assume they are ethnic Ukrainians

    #390344

    Anonymous

    After some more research into the Polischuky people of southern Belarus and northern Ukraine I can say that ALL belong and are ethnic Ukrainians.   

    When it comes to the Belarusian Polischuky people today most Identify as being Belarusians and are not aware of their Ukrainian origins. Their old native Ukrainian dialect languages (Polesian language) is practically dead only a few very old people still speak it. Most people speak Russian or a mixed language.

    I am lucky that I was brought up hearing the beautiful West Polesian language  my grandmother speaks from the old country of Yanow Poleskie.  I can only hope that the Polischuk people of Belarus and all Belarusians survive this Russifcation of such a beautiful and unique culture and history. Peace

    #390345

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I can only hope that the Polischuk people of Belarus and all Belarusians survive this Russifcation of such a beautiful and unique culture and history. Peace

    Sadly, Poleschuki in other countires were assimilated. (Ukraine and Poland) Only those in Belorussia preserved their special identity.
    Concerning Russification, get serious, Russian is language of educated Belorussians for centuries, it is not Russification, at least not forced.

    #390346

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Sadly, Poleschuki in other countires were assimilated. (Ukraine and Poland) Only those in Belorussia preserved their special identity.
    Concerning Russification, get serious, Russian is language of educated Belorussians for centuries, it is not Russification, at least not forced.

    I am serious
    through out history both the Poles and Russians have tried to assimilate forced Polanisation or Russifacation of the Belarusian and Ukrainian people depending what part of those country you live in.
    Sadly in Belarus' case the Iron curton never fell and since 1991 the Belarusian language and culture has been losing out to Russian forced on the population by the government. I suggest you research before you type.

    #390347

    Anonymous

    I heard an opinion that Polischuky are a distinct ethnic group like Rusyns, they had their own unique language and genetics connected with ancient tribes in forest zone of Eastern Europe, regardless of mixing with other Ukrainians and Belarusians. I do not know how true this view.

    After some more research into the Polischuky people of southern Belarus and northern Ukraine I can say that ALL belong and are ethnic Ukrainians.

    Can we see any sources or evidences for your conclusion?

    #390348

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Sadly in Belarus' case the Iron curton never fell and since 1991 the Belarusian language and culture has been losing out to Russian forced on the population by the government. I suggest you research before you type.

    Like I said previously, Russian was allways language of educated people in Belorussin. That situation is from XVIII century, before that literary language was Polish, and before that Church Slavonic. It is not Russification, mova was not elevated on literary language, nor standardized until Soviet times. Even stauncmost oponents of Lukashenko use Russian mostly. That is why I said get serious before generalizing things.

    #390349

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I am serious
    through out history both the Poles and Russians have tried to assimilate forced Polanisation or Russifacation of the Belarusian and Ukrainian people depending what part of those country you live in.
    Sadly in Belarus' case the Iron curton never fell and since 1991 the Belarusian language and culture has been losing out to Russian forced on the population by the government. I suggest you research before you type.

    The language spoken in western Polesia ( a separate language on linguistic continuum between Ukrainian and Belarusian or a dialect of Ukrainian, however one defines it)  was always spoken language only. There were attempts to introduce the literature language in the late 80s, however. The language was spoken by a minority and with urbanisation the language was always going to be overwhelmed. It happened to other Slavic dialects in Russia, Ukraine and Poland. You can blame the Russians or Belarusians speaking Russian for the russification of the dialect spoken in Polesia if that will make you fill any better.

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