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  • #369950

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Hah now I understand why only choir sings these :D A bit hard for laity to sing  ;D
    But maybe under leadership of cantor they would learn.

    Uf, not really, this is acctually one of easier melodies :) It takes year or two to learn Serbian or Byzantine chant. Some parts of Liturgy, are sometime sung by all Church (at least Oče naš and Creed), but it is not widespread. 

    #369951

    Anonymous

    Тебе одјејушчагосја in Serbian chant. This is example of most widespread style of singing in Serbian churches, one or few cantors is/are singing:
    Тебe одјејушчагосја
    This hymn is from Vespers of Great Friday.

    #369952

    Anonymous
    #369953

    Anonymous

    I posted a 3 minute part of the Serbian Orthodox Requiem (Opelo in b minor) sung by the Vox Slavicum Choir (first clip) in the post above, now I would like to share the whole 18 minute piece.

    Stevan Hristić – Opelo

    #369954

    Anonymous

    Great pieces, thank you for sharing. I'm a sucker for requiems, btw.

    "Milost Mira" sing by the great Bulgarian opera singer Boris Hristov:
    Boris hristov- Milost mira (Bulgarian orthodox chant)

    #369955

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I posted a 3 minute part of the Serbian Orthodox Requiem (Opelo in b minor) sung by the Vox Slavicum Choir (first clip) in the post above, now I would like to share the whole 18 minute piece.

    Opelo and Requiem are not same thing. Requiem is mass for dead, opelo (παραστάς, парастос, панихида,) is derived from night services of Orthodox Church (Vespers and Matines). Services are comparable,  but with a wholly different ritual form and texts.

    Tu cut off offtopic ;D , what Cvetinov posted is example of Western type church compositions used in Orthodox services. It is rarelly used in Serbian Church. 

    #369956

    Anonymous

    Thank you for specifying, Dalibor, what is what in cultural context :)
    "Tebe Poem" – Boris Hristov
    BORIS CHRISTOFF " TEBE POEM" Vassily Zinoviev

    #369957

    Anonymous
    #369958

    Anonymous
    #369959

    Anonymous

    I like the way how Armenians sing in this (1:14 and onwards). and their black capes look a bit strange  :)

    2009 Washing of the Feet in Holy Etchmiadzin

    #369960

    Anonymous

    Well Armenians are not Orthodox (I mean specifically Byzantine chalcidonite dyophysites). They are mypahisites (Previously known as monophyistes) or better known in English Oreintal Orhodox. Their rite is similar to Eastern Orthodox, but nevertheless, Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Churches share much more theological wievs.

    #369961

    Anonymous

    still, oriental or whatnot, still orthodox.
    well somewhere i read they arent monophysites.

    #369962

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    still, oriental or whatnot, still orthodox.
    well somewhere i read they arent monophysites.

    No, they are not seen as Orthodox by Eastern Orthodox Churches (Church of Constantinople, Church of Alexandria, Church of Antioch, Church of Jerusalme, Church of Moscow, Church of Peć, Church of Bucurest, Church of Sofia, Church of Tbilisi, Church of Leukosia, Church of Athens, Church of Warsaw, Church of Tirana, Church of Prague and OCA). The Oriental Orthodox Churches and Diophysite Church (generic term for Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholic Churches) split over differences in Christology. In other languages (except English) those churches are not even called orthodox (Древневосточные церкви, Дохалкидонске цркве, Προχαλκηδόνιες Εκκλησίες, Églises des trois conciles, Altorientalische Kirchen)

    From OrthodoxWiki

    The term Oriental Orthodox refers to the churches of Eastern Christian traditions that keep the faith of only the first three Ecumenical Councils of the Orthodox Church—the councils of Nicea I, Constantinople I and Ephesus. The Oriental Orthodox churches rejected the dogmatic definitions of the Council of Chalcedon (A.D. 451).

    Thus, despite potentially confusing nomenclature, Oriental Orthodox churches are distinct from the churches that collectively are referred to as Eastern Orthodoxy.

    The Oriental Orthodox churches came to a parting of the ways with the remainder of Christianity in the 5th century. The separation resulted in part from the Oriental Orthodox churches' refusal to accept the Christological dogmas promulgated by the Council of Chalcedon, which held that Jesus Christ is in two natures — one divine and one human, although these were inseparable. To the hierarchs who would lead the Oriental Orthodox, this was tantamount to accepting Nestorianism. In response, they advocated a formula that stressed unity of the Incarnation over all other considerations, that being "one nature of God the Word Incarnate", "of/from two natures" in and after the union. The Oriental Orthodox churches are therefore often called "Monophysite" churches, although they reject this label, which is associated with Eutychian Monophysitism, preferring the term non-Chalcedonian or Miaphysite churches. Oriental Orthodox Christians anathematize the Monophysite teachings of Eutyches. They are sometimes also known as anti-Chalcedonians.

    In the 20th century, a number of dialogues have occurred between the Oriental Orthodox and the Chalcedonian Orthodox which suggest that both communions now share a common Christology with differing terminology. As yet, full communion has not been restored. There have also been some agreed Christological statements issued in conjunction with the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox (Chalcedonian) family (Ecumenical Patriarchate and official representatives of other Eastern Orthodox Churches)

    Well, it must be noted there that dialogues were not official dialogues between Churches but rather dialogue between theologians (who on other hand represented their respective Chuches). However ot of Orthodox clergy and theologians strongly object that statmens.

    #369963

    Anonymous

    To all this should be added that most of the Armenians in general are not religious, caucasian mentality dominates over Christian and any connections with Orthodoxes exist only on paper, even their priests in Bethlehem behave like savages.

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