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  • #345007

    Anonymous

    Do you know anything about the Eastern/Slavic rite in Lesser Poland?

    We know that the Lesser Poland (together with Silesia) was baptised by the Cyril & Methodius followers. It is probable, that in Kraków before 1000 AD (the catholic bishopric foundation) was a Slavic rite bishopric. The question is when the Latin rite completely overcame the Slavic one.

    What I've heard (that needs confirming):
    → there're coin(s) from 11th or 12th century bearing Cyrillic inscriptions, originating in Lesser Poland (not an import).
    → probably the relics of the Slavic rite lived until about 14th century.

    Any of you know of good articles or books on that matter?

    I'm sorry if I've posted in a wrong topic.

    #409470

    Anonymous

    ehm malopolska is a broad term. can you tell exact location of coins origin?
    any link on sources saying something about byzantine (not slavic) rite in malopolska in that times? where did you hear or read about that coin?
    afaik eastern rite thrived in parts of that region until after ww2 (action vistula), and some vestiges survived until today (my mother who once was there says that some of wooden churches there were converted to roman catholic while some remained orthodox or byzantine catholic.)

    #409471

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    ehm malopolska is a broad term. can you tell exact location of coins origin?
    any link on sources saying something about byzantine (not slavic) rite in malopolska in that times? where did you hear or read about that coin?

    For the "what I've heard" part I have no links/sources (just heard it somewhere), that's why I asked for them here (if there're any, of course). As Malopolska it probably meant the Kraków and Sandomierz voivodships (or earlier dukedoms).

    afaik eastern rite thrived in parts of that region until after ww2 (action vistula), and some vestiges survived until today (my mother who once was there says that some of wooden churches there were converted to roman catholic while some remained orthodox or byzantine catholic.)

    I'm not sure if these lands were historically Małopolska or Rus'.

    #409472

    Anonymous

    southeast of nowy sacz and south of sanok. where rusyns and ukrainians used to live.

    #409473

    Anonymous

    What I've found about this coin. It's a coin of Bolesław I, and probably made by Ruthenian artisans captured in Kiev, with the inscription БОЛЄСЛАВЪ.

    image

    But there're some hypotheses, that this coin originate from Lesser Poland and is a relic of Slavic rite Christians from there. So I don't know.

    As from the Rusyns in Lesser Poland – AFAIK they are immigrants from Rus', and migrated with the Vlachs.

    #409474

    Anonymous

    however i dont know who would bring eastern rite into that area before rusyns came there.

    #409475

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    however i dont know who would bring eastern rite into that area before rusyns came there.

    Svatopluk I of Great Moravia. Silesia and Lesser Poland was first baptised in Slavic rite, in the end of 9th century. (There's even a story about a duke of Vistulans, who hadn't wanted to be baptised by free will, so he was taken by force and baptised by force. From Methodius' Life, if I recall correctly).

    Quote (from wikipedia, so the reliability should be confirmed – it gives a source, I will search for it):
    „Chrześcijaństwo wschodnie z obrządkiem słowiańskim istniało na ziemiach polskich już w IX w. Ślady kultu w obrządku słowiańskim znajdujemy m.in. w Krakowie, Wiślicy i Przemyślu[2]. Ośrodki te nie były pod kontrolą Kościoła łacińskiego i pozostawały pod wpływem cywilizacji bizantyjskiej z liturgią słowiańską i pismem cyrylickim. Kościół metodiański, funkcjonujący na południowych obszarach ziem polskich, już za Bolesława Chrobrego znalazł się w formie szczątkowej, poprzez przyjęcie chrześcijaństwa ze strony Czech; Polska znalazła się zaś w sferze cywilizacji łacińskiej.”

    English translation:
    "The Eastern Christianity with the Slavic rite existed on the Polish lands alrady in the 9th century. The relics of Slavic rite cult are found in Kraków, Wiślica and Przemyśl. These centers weren't under Latin Church control and remained under influence of the Byzantine civilisation, with the Slavic liturgy and Cyrillic writing. Methodius' Church, existing in southern Poland, during Bolesław I Chrobry's reign was already in regress, because by accepting Christianity from Bohemia, Poland became a part of the Latin civilisation."

    [size=8pt]The source is given as:
    Karolina Lanckorońska, Studies on the Roman-Slavonic Rite in Poland, Rome 1961.[/size]

    #409476

    Anonymous

    Hmm i never heard about that.

    however svetopluk supported latin clergy and fought against methodios. surely he would want to give his opponent more influence on occupied territories.

    #409477

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    however svetopluk supported latin clergy and fought against methodios. surely he would want to give his opponent more influence on occupied territories.

    Methodius was the bishop of his country, had pope's blessing and Svetopluk didn't throw out the Methodius' followers (clergy, students etc) until death of the latter.

    However, that's not why I'm writing here. I've laid my hands on some source. What other it says about this topic (besides what's already said):

    1. The Saints Cyrill and Methodius' cult in Poland originated inside the country. They were considered the „apostles of Poland”, and only from Poland the cult moved to Moravia and Bohemia.

    2. Gall the Anonymous writes in his Chronicle (a lament on Boleslav I the Brave):
    Tanti viri funus mecum, omnis homo, recole,
    Dives, pauper, miles, clerus, insuper agricolae,
    Latinorum et Slavorum quotquot estis incolae!

    That roughly means:
    „Let all men recall with me the burial of a great man, rich, poor, soldiers, clerics, also villagers, all who are dwellers [maybe: parishers] of Latins and Slavs”.

    It's probable that this tells about the followers of the two rites: Latin and Slavic.

    3. Old Polish chroniclers (Gall, Kadłubek, Długosz) say that from the oldest times, there were two archbishops in Poland. It's understood as the Latin bishopric in Gniezno and Slavic in Cracow.

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