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  • #347219

    Anonymous

    Eastern Europe, in general the 19 and 20th century, had a history of pan-slavism. It was quite popular in Russia. Czechia and Slovakia had Czechoslovakia. Most southern slavs had Yugoslavia. However, how about Bulgaria and Poland? Did they ever have serious pan-slavist movements? Poland has a clear reason to not like pan-slavism, the russian domination wasn’t too kind. And Bulgaria? Is Pan-Slavism is strong there? If not, why not?

    #421376

    Anonymous


    Bulgaria:

    If Bulgaria joined Yugo there is a big chance Yugoslavia would survive, Serbs wouldn’t be the most numerous nation and as such they couldn’t dominate the internal Political situation and as a result there would be no rebellious nations (except by them maybe if the situation wouldn’t fit them not being the boss anymore).

    Poland:

    Poland was too big and proud to willingly join any Slavic union and share control (dat Nationalism and how great Hussars we are + that sweet fake friendship with Magyars), and on the other side too weak and poor to subdue and control other smaller Slavic states (reality check). 

    Russia:

    They were pretty stupid too, instead of letting Bulgaria join ex-Yu they would make the country stronger and as such chance of ex-YU break up would be smaller too, meaning probably USSR wouldn’t break too. Russians and their hidden “pravoslavny” nationalism… Today they weep how YU broke apart and tell fairy-tales, while in fact they never wanted it to be strong or to become maybe large because a bigger “Slavic” union could mean a death to their Soviet Union (folk are more prone to Slavism than to Communism)… and it would mean Moscow wouldn’t be the center of Slavic world anymore. 

    Why only Slavic Union (Yugoslavia) died?

    Fact is the only viable “Pan-Slavic” union we had was the YugoSlavia that was based more on post-ww2 unity of Slavs (more than communism) in Balkan area. It died because of Americans not liking it out of fear of Slavic unity i.e. merging with Russia and Poland (thus supporting Slovenian, Croatian and Bosnian nationalists) and Russia not liking it out of fear of parallel better Slavic union than their USSR (thus supporting Serbian, Montenegrin and Bosnian Serb nationalists)….

    When you actually sum it all, Slavs are morons…fact is only small Slavic states as Czech, Slovaks, Cros, Serbs, Mac, Slov etc were pan-Slavists because they needed power and strengths in unity. The bigger Slavic states as Russia, Poland and Ukraine were always the killers of such plans due to their selfish politics and wish for sole domination…

    #421359

    Anonymous

    The EU has this advantage over a slavic union – when it falls apart the wars are going to be much more multicultural, which is always a good thing, no matter the context. Just ask a politician.

    #383548

    Anonymous

    Bulgaria isn’t really a pan-Slavist country because of the former wars provoked by Serbia hours after the Unification of North and South Bulgaria and of course – Communism. 
    Now Bulgaria values it’s identity and freedom more than ever. And I personally think that this is the reason why Bulgaria joined NATO and the EU – to get away from the pan-Slavist idea which wounded Bulgaria to a big extent (lost territories, the intelligence has been killed by the Soviets and all those “beautiful” things).  

    #383541

    Anonymous

    I sometimes think that naivete should be criminalized.

    #383539

    Anonymous

    Since Bulgaria was formed by unifying seven Slavic tribes does that make it somewhat pan-Slavist despite modern politics?

    #359639

    Anonymous

    The “Seven Slavic Tribes” were already a confederation of tribes when Bulgaria was formed. They were one of the slavic sides, but there were others.

    #359605

    Anonymous

    To the OPs question (Is Pan-Slavism strong in Bulgaria), I’d say the answer is ” Definitely not”. Maybe it was strong one-two centuries ago, but now and particularly after the (official) fall of the communist regime it’s not. On the contrary – the artificial Pan-Slavism enforced by the communist authorities has created a backlash against the Slavic idea nowadays, to the point that a large part of the more nationalistic Bulgarians deny us being Slavs and even deny the historical existence of Slavs (i.e. “the Slavs and Pan-Slavism were created by Catherine the Great as a means for Russia to exert influence and control over the people of Eastern Europe” and other such conspiratorial stuff).

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