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  • #343970

    Anonymous

    Planine (Croatian; "Mountains") is the title of the first Croatian novel, written by Petar Zoranić in 1536 and published posthumously in Venice in 1569.

    It is a pastoral-allegorical novel (a very common type of prose in that period), written in combined prose and verse. Typologically it's a unique piece of its kind in Croatian literature, with motifs borrowed from Latinate and Italian literatures, with clearly discernible influences of Virgil, Ovid, Dante, Boccaccio, Petrarch, Jacopo Sannazaro, as well as domicile writers such as Marko Marulić and Croatian začinjavci.

    Content

    The work tells about poet's imaginary seven-day journey across Croatian mountains on which he embarks in order to forget his love miseries. But, the principle line of the story is patriotic in character.

    The main hero is the shepherd Zoran (i.e. Zoranić himself), which for seven years has been suffering from unrequited love towards a maiden Jaga. One morning, wandering around, he arrives to a well called Vodica, having gotten bored with his life. Suddenly from a well a fairy Zorica (Napeja) appears, advising him to go for the mountains to find a particular plant which will cure his love pain. Then on a golden apple he makes a notice of a beautiful fairy Grace (Milošća) which transfers him across the seas to Podgorje, where he continues the journey by himself. But, soon he runs into a beast, from which Grace saves him and leads him by safer pathways. Afterwards, he arrives to the Gates of hell (Paklenica), where the fairy tells him a tale on a young maiden Bura. The next day Zoran meets a company of shepherds with whom he spends the next three days. On the fifth day, Zoran hears from shepherds a story on the origin of Velebit and heads further to the east. There he discovers a small group of shepherds that complains of being attacked by the wolves from eastern sides (i.e. Turks), which has caused many of the shepherds to flee those areas. The next day Zoran is contacted by a fairy Consciousness (Svist) who directs him to the fairy Dinara. Dinara frees him by his magic powers from his love sufferings. Then Zoran dreams a vision of four fairies in a "gardens of Glory" (perivoj od Slave). These are the fairies Latinness (Latinka), Helleness (Grkinja) and Croatess (Hrvatica). While the first three hold in their arms a handful of golden apples (the symbol of a literary piece), the fairy Croatess is poor and makes a complaint on the small number of literary pieces written in folk language. The sixth day Zoran heads for home, but on his way he meets Dinara's daughter, fairy Krka, which drives him across Knin, Skradin and Šibenik down to the mouth of Krka (where she makes her disappearance). Thence, fairy Grace returns him back to Zaton, the place of his departure. There he finds a grave of Juraj Divnić, the bishop of Nin, and swears to follow the path of Lord's love.

    The novel is composed of 24 chapters, and the introductory contains a dedication to Matej Matijević, the canon of Nin.

    Soruce; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planine

    Anyway is there any way to read novel Planine from 1536  in original text? This i mean in a sense that it isn't written in modern standard Croatian but as copy of original writing but in modern style Latin script. I am not sure if you ppl will understand my question but still i ask?

    #394925

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Anyway is there any way to read novel Planine from 1536  in original text? This i mean in a sense that it isn't written in modern standard Croatian but as copy of original writing but in modern style Latin script. I am not sure if you ppl will understand my question but still i ask?

    Like I said in chat you have entire novel on wikisource:
    In Čakavian written by Gajica.
    http://hr.wikisource.org/wiki/Planine

    #394926

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Like I said in chat you have entire novel on wikisource:
    In Čakavian written by Gajica.
    http://hr.wikisource.org/wiki/Planine

    Ok thanks. :D

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