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  • #345005

    Anonymous

    In other European countries there are the stone circles and standing stones. There are also the burial chambers made from huge rocks. I have tried to find examples of any of these in or even near Poland, but have been unable to.  My question is does Poland have any? If so are they like those of other countries or are the very different? Anyone have pictures or links?
    If I have posted this in the wrong section please move it to the correct one. TIA

    #409424

    Anonymous

    those things exist in northwestern europe.

    #409425

    Anonymous

    There are Dolmen in Borkowo, that I know of.

    [img width=360 height=230]http://lh5.ggpht.com/-V4BQrmlJQz4/TDQyUKWk-AI/AAAAAAAAA3o/2ArXArhzDkg/01072010_009.jpg” />

    #409426

    Anonymous

    Krkavški menhir;

    image

    image

    #409427

    Anonymous

    wannabe stonehenges  ;D

    #409428

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    wannabe stonehenges  ;D

    Better than nothing. :)

    #409429

    Anonymous

    Thanks! This is going to settle an argument I've had with the Irish husband for a few years now. We both looked all over youtube and the net and couldn't find one.  Every other country had some. Now my soul can rest easy. 
    Next question and it's probably going to be opinion only.  Do you think it was the same culture or people building them as in the rest of Europe? It seems that Slavic peoples used tree trunks to build statues and markers for important things/people/gods.  Was there a reason for that? I don't believe that we didn't know how to use rocks or were too lazy to move them. Could there have been a religious significance for using trees instead of rock? Even Stonehenge had some tree trunk circles or posts at one time. So what do you think was going on?

    #409430

    Anonymous

    those things are predominantly located in northwestern europe. ok lets say those few wannabe menhirs elsewhere are an exception  ;D

    and they were build long before slavs came to europe as we see them today.

    #409431

    Anonymous

    http://www.megalithic.co.uk/search.php?query=&country=38

    I just found this other site. It lists mostly hill forts and long barrows.  Again not much stone work. So who were these people who occupied the area before the Slavs and made these?

    #409432

    Anonymous

    How can we know? people werent recording interwievs back then  :)

    #409433

    Anonymous

    AFAIK you can find them in Eastern Europe as well. However not as big like stonehenge.

    #409434

    Anonymous

    After reading the wonderful thread on old Slavic architecture, I have to accept the fact that the Slavs built mainly with wood.  It goes against the practice of making buildings with the most abundant materials.  It appears that no matter how many stones they had  laying around they chose wood to make the body of their buildings.  Stones did make better foundations. 
    If this really was the common practice, then they didn't care as much about fire damage and permanence of a building. They loved the beauty, forms, and designs that could be created much more easily out of wood. To me this also implies that they weren't defense motivated. They weren't afraid enough of anyone to build a stone structure to keep them out.
    With this kind of evidence looking me in the face I imagine that any reason others had to build a megalith was in turn a cause to create a wooden object instead.  This would be in keeping with the culture, but it makes those studying early Slavic history cry.  Most of those structures just didn't last into the present time.  Darn our tree hugging ancestors!

    #409435

    Anonymous

    In Poland we have some kromlech's.
    In Grzybnica for exampleimageimage
    image
    Here is map:image
    Those standing in Odraimageimage
    image

    #409436

    Anonymous

    our ancestors were anything but tree-hugging. they devastated forests mercilessly, you know you have to cut few trees to build a hut and many trees if you want to make warm food. am not even going into need for pastures and arable soil, blacksmithing, wood coal makers, etc.

    they surely didnt build wooden objects out of fun or some romantic reasons. they used wood simply because it was easy to get. slavs in pannonia used clay and stones, for example.
    yes wooden houses were prone to fire. actually in 18th, 19th century raw brick, clay and stone houses began rapidly expanding into hilly areas in carpathians. simply because wood is inferior to clay, stone or raw bricks in terms of longevity (although wood insulates better).
    with this came much wider use of various baroque/secession elements in folk architecture.

    things like stonehenge etc. were built simply because ruling class connected with pagan cults convinced people to work on that (go cut those stones or wrath of gods strikes you down!). surely they wouldnt work like drugged ants on something theyre not going to use. people were always lazy. and will be  ;D

    youre looking at history through eyes of contemporary human with romantic glasses.

    #409437

    Anonymous

    Tree hugger was a bit of a joke :P  I don't think I'm looking at this from "mystical white dove moonbat" perspective.  I looked at the land many of those  homes and churches were built on and there were plenty of rocks to use for building material.  Yet, they chose wood.  Why?

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