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  • #344702

    Anonymous

    So this town is in Silesian and was Germanised relatively early. Now my question is from which traditional Polish region Polish settlers of Wrocław predominated after WWII Polish acquisition of east German lands?

    #402626

    Anonymous

    In Lower Silesia population exchange after WW2 was nearly 100%, basically Germans were replaced by Poles, a significant part of them (just like in other ex-German lands) indeed was resettled from Kresy. Situation in Upper Silesia was much different as parts of it belonged to Poland before WW2, a large part of population in ex-German areas were Slavs (more or less Germanized) or people from mixed families, many of them were Polish enough to pass as Poles when they wanted to stay there after WW2, additionally many Germans were allowed or in some cases even forced to stay there after WW2 to keep all the heavy industry operating. So in result a significiant part of population in Upper Silesia are "natives", some of them regard themselves as Poles, some as Germans, others primary as Silesians.

    #402627

    Anonymous

    I am aware of that Mordid but i want to know from which traditional Polish regions these new settlers in Wrocław predominated.

    #402628

    Anonymous

    Many of the repatriated Poles were settled in formerly German eastern provinces, after 1945, the so-called "Recovered Territories” (Ziemie Odzyskane). Term was based on the fact that they have been in the past the possession of the Piast dynasty of Polish kings, Polish fiefs or included in the parts lost to Prussia during the Partitions of Poland.

    As for the population of Wrocław it was increased by resettlement of Poles forming part of postwar repatriation of Poles (1944–1946) (75%) as well as the forced deportations from Polish lands annexed by the Soviet Union in the east (25%) including from cities such as Lwów (now Lviv, Ukraine), Stanisławów (now Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine), Wilno (now Vilnius, Lithuania), and Grodno (now Hrodna, Belarus). “Recovered Territories” were also settled by many Poles from ruined regions in central and southern Poland, called by Germans the General Government for the Occupied Polish Territories.

    image

    More here and here

    #402629

    Anonymous

    Thank you for info Prelja. So i can safely assume bulk of Wrocław population is Poles who came from western areas of modern Belarus and Ukraine?

    #402630

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Thank you for info Prelja. So i can safely assume bulk of Wrocław population is Poles who came from western areas of modern Belarus and Ukraine?

    Yes, many of them came from Kresy, a former territory of the eastern provinces of Poland.

    #402631

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Yes, many of them came from Kresy, a former territory of the eastern provinces of Poland.

    It would be really cool to make thread about these Poles from east Kresy about their culture, architecture, costumes, etc. I am interested in this.

    #402632

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    It would be really cool to make thread about these Poles from east Kresy about their culture, architecture, costumes, etc. I am interested in this.

    Ok, I'll try to find something  :)

    #402633

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Ok, I'll try to find something  :)

    Thanks! :)

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