• This topic has 18 voices and 107 replies.
Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 108 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #385593

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Err it is same as Russian И.

    Not when I say it :) .. or three is different than pee. Hmm maybe it isn't.

    Svevlad type both letters in Google Translator and press listen, if you don't notice the difference well, hell you just don't notice the difference.

    #385594

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    What he said ;) The difference is really subtle and even after a year of studying Russian, I still find it really hard to hear the difference in some cases (although context does help a lot: быть = to be, бить = to hit someone :P)

    To compare to Serbian: in Serbian, л is hard and љ is soft, although I believe in Serbian the difference is way more audible, since you actually say "lj".
    See it like this: in Russian, you can make a consonant hard/soft by altering the vowel that follows it (or by adding ь or ъ), while in Serbian, you simply write a different consonant.
    Correct me if I'm wrong!

    Well, we do no palatalize that much, and we just have и, but љ, њ, ђ, ћ, are good examples. 

    #385595

    Anonymous

    I think it's better If I learn from a person I can hear from. I'll just find someone in Melbourne who can teach me. Dalibor and frijnsje, thanks for trying to explain it, Cvetinov, thanks also, and for the link.

    #385596

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    To compare to Serbian: in Serbian, л is hard and љ is soft, although I believe in Serbian the difference is way more audible, since you actually say "lj".

    I thought so as well, but then I noticed that Czechs can't pronounce Љ, they speak it out as 'l[size=1pt]'[/size]j', which is the latin form of the letter, but not the form it is spoken. There is a subtle difference between Љ and l[size=1pt]'[/size]j in pronunciation, which I wasn't aware of, until I heard Czechs pronounce it.

    #385597

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I think it's better If I learn from a person I can hear from. I'll just find someone in Melbourne who can teach me. Dalibor and frijnsje, thanks for trying to explain it, Cvetinov, thanks also, and for the link.

    Go to Google translate, (English-Russian), just fill in the words "be" and "beat" on the English side and then you will get the words быть and бить on the Russian side. Then just click to listen how they are pronounced.

    #385598

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Ok I think I would learn more, if you post translations accompanying it :)

    To be honest, it would be great.

    I thought you wanted me to post something in Russian so you could translate it :) But it’s no problem, I’ll translate the poem. I’m not saying that my translation is perfect, so if anyone sees mistakes, please correct them  :)

    Вот и выпал первый снег
    Here the first snow fell

    первый снег
    (The) first snow

    Он покрыл долины рек
    He covered river valleys

    А река течёт черна
    And the river is flowing black

    Вся жива ещё до дна
    All that is still alive (goes) to the bottom (Not 100% sure if I translated the actual meaning of this line correctly)

    Вся любовь моя черна
    All my love is black

    Вся жива ещё до дна
    All that is still alive (goes) to the bottom

    Льдом покроется она
    Ice has covered it / it is covered with ice

    Но на свете есть весна
    But on the world it is spring

    Я приветствую тебя
    I greet you

    Не жалея, не скорбя
    Don’t feel sorry, don’t grieve

    Хоть невесело идти
    Though sadly going (or it's sad to go, that would be better I think)

    На седом твоём пути
    On your gray way (I think “седом” can refer to gray-haired people, like “сед / sijed” in our language. I think if it refers to something else than hair color in Russian, like in this example, that it means something like a combination of sad and old, you know what I mean. Not 100% sure about that though)

    I think it's actually an interesting poem, it is probably about someone who is dying or someone who is depressed I think.

    #385599

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I thought you wanted me to post something in Russian so you could translate it.

    I thought I could, but I believe it is better for me, as well as for other members if we see the actual translation. That way I can learn words I did not know. Thank you. :) Please keep on, and don't forget the translations.

    #385600

    Anonymous

    Мне очень нравятся стихи Хармса  :)

    Встреча

    Вот однажды один человек пошел на  служ-
    бу, да по дороге встретил  другого человека,
    который, купив польский батон, направлялся к
    себе восвояси.
        Вот, собственно, и все.

    Перевод нужен?

    #385601

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Мне очень нравятся стихи Хармса  :)

    Встреча

    Вот однажды один человек пошел на  служ-
    бу, да по дороге встретил  другого человека,
    который, купив польский батон, направлялся к
    себе восвояси.
        Вот, собственно, и все.

    Перевод нужен?

    Нужен, нужен :)

    #385602

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Нужен, нужен :)

    Как ты желаешь  ;)

    Встреча
    The encounter

    Вот однажды один человек пошел на  службу,
    One day a man went to his office
    да по дороге встретил  другого человека,
    and on the road he met another man
    который, купив польский батон,
    which, having bought a baguette
    направлялся к себе восвояси.
    went back to his house
        Вот, собственно, и все.
    This is really everything

    #385603

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Мне очень нравятся стихи Хармса  :)

    Встреча

    Вот однажды один человек пошел на  служ-
    бу, да по дороге встретил  другого человека,
    который, купив польский батон, направлялся к
    себе восвояси.
        Вот, собственно, и все.

    Перевод нужен?

    I speak a bit Russian and Bulgarian so i got everything except "восвояси". Is it neologism from во and свой?

    #385604

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I speak a bit Russian and Bulgarian so i got everything except "восвояси". Is it neologism from во and свой?

    The dictionary says:

    восвояси – нареч. разг. ирон.

    back; home

    отправиться восвояси — go home, go back where one came from

    So I guess it is more of conversational language rather than written language, but yes, it means "home" (I translated it that way as well)

    #385605

    Anonymous

    Can somebody help me with this? I'm translating Zoshchenko's story "Lemonade" and I'm stuck on this sentence:

    Ежели другой раз и выпью, то мало так, приличия ради или славную компанию поддержать.

    My translation: If I drink another time, then it is a little, for the sake of decency or to support nice company.
    What I'm not sure about in my translation is the part то мало так.

    #385606

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Can somebody help me with this? I'm translating Zoshchenko's story "Lemonade" and I'm stuck on this sentence:

    Ежели другой раз и выпью, то мало так, приличия ради или славную компанию поддержать.

    My translation: If I drink another time, then it is a little, for the sake of decency or to support nice company.
    What I'm not sure about in my translation is the part то мало так.

    maybe too little

    #385607

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Can somebody help me with this? I'm translating Zoshchenko's story "Lemonade" and I'm stuck on this sentence:

    Ежели другой раз и выпью, то мало так, приличия ради или славную компанию поддержать.

    My translation: If I drink another time, then it is a little, for the sake of decency or to support nice company.
    What I'm not sure about in my translation is the part то мало так.

    то мало так = that's so little. That would be a literal translation. In this sentence, it would be more like "that will be so little". 

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 108 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Slavorum

9 User(s) Online Join Server
  • Piachu
  • Drizzt
  • Yung Slav
  • kony97
  • Родни Никотин ☭
  • Kratos