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  • #342408

    Anonymous
    #368092

    Anonymous

    Good Lord! Prussians viewed Southern Germans as barbarians as well?

    Whenever I think of Germany, especially German culture, traditions, cuisine and architecture, it is usually Southern Germany (particularly Swabia and Bavaria) that come to mind, not Prussia (all that comes to mind when I think of them is war and supriority complex).

    Had they gained more influence in 1800's, WWI and WWII would probably never happened at all. Yeah, I know, Hitler was Austrian by birth, but he was pure Prussian at heart. Much like Stalin was born Georgian, but at heart was total Muscovite. Interesting info! Thanks!

    #368093

    Anonymous

    You may not forget one major consideration for the South German principalities to join the Reich led by Prussia were the permanent devastating attacks from France. Mind you, when, for example, Polish and German troops were defending Vienna against the Turks, France fell in our back and annexed Alsace and Lorraine.
    So the major consideration was hate and fear of France, not love for Prussia.
    In for a Penny, in for a Pound, you know…

    #368094

    Anonymous

    Stalin was noted for telling his mother

    "Do you remember the tsar? Well, I'm like a tsar", replied Stalin.

    #368095

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    You may not forget one major consideration for the South German principalities to join the Reich led by Prussia were the permanent devastating attacks from France. Mind you, when, for example, Polish and German troops were defending Vienna against the Turks, France fell in our back and annexed Alsace and Lorraine.
    So the major consideration was hate and fear of France, not love for Prussia.
    In for a Penny, in for a Pound, you know…

    To me, it seems, that Bavaria and Austria are much closer related that Bavaria ever was to Bismarck's Prussia. I think that it was a deliberate move by Bismarck and his administration to exclude Austria from the German Reich so as to divide the German Catholics who were practically all in Bavaria and Austria.

    Also, on a side note (I have brought this up before too) but in Poland my Grandfather used to say "Serwus" for a casual goodbye and I was surprised and delighted to hear that Bavarians also use this slang. Also, tea with milk in Polish is called "bawarka." Haha, I am not sure how that last bit came to be.

    #368096

    Anonymous

    In south western Poland people use serwus even in the present. Come to think of it Germans on the other side of the river use it as well. Maybe not the most common greeting but it does exist.

    #368097

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    In south western Poland people use serwus even in the present. Come to think of it Germans on the other side of the river use it as well. Maybe not the most common greeting but it does exist.

    In Western Ukraine it is sometimes used as well.

    @Topic: interesting thread. I knew that Southern Germans (especially Bavarians) never really liked the Prussians, now I know why. I currently live in Bavaria and I came across that some Bavarians still haven't forgotten about the Prussian arrogance. A common offense in Bavaria is "Saubreiß", which means "Prussian pig" in the Bavarian dialect.

    #368098

    Anonymous

    We use a lot of old Polish slang in my family but we hadn't had a clue it was actually Polish, it was something the Great Grandparents and further back just passed down to my Mother and she taught it to us "What does that word mean? 'It means that'" – since it wasn't Ukrainian, we had just assumed it was something we made up and it was a family tradition.

    I think foreign languages stick better as slang?  That may explain why many Polish families still use serwus.

    #368099

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    To me, it seems, that Bavaria and Austria are much closer related that Bavaria ever was to Bismarck's Prussia. I think that it was a deliberate move by Bismarck and his administration to exclude Austria from the German Reich so as to divide the German Catholics who were practically all in Bavaria and Austria.

    Also, on a side note (I have brought this up before too) but in Poland my Grandfather used to say "Serwus" for a casual goodbye and I was surprised and delighted to hear that Bavarians also use this slang. Also, tea with milk in Polish is called "bawarka." Haha, I am not sure how that last bit came to be.

    It is no doubt Austrian (Southern German) influence ("Serwus", "Bawarka" and other German-language loanwords in Polish). Many Southern Poles remember very fondly old Austrian emperors under whom they/their ancestors lived, since they Poles had full autonomy, freedom of language, culture, education etc. and even positions in government.

    Total opposite of how Russian and Prussian imperialism is remember by Poles/their descendents living under their partitions, where we were victims of expulsions, repressions, oppression and respective "ations".

    #368100

    Anonymous

    Bavarians and Austrians have huge Slavic influence.

    Austrian lands were populated by slavic Carantanians;
    image

    Many bavarian rulers populated uninhabitated areas with Slavic settlers, there are still many bavarian villages with slavic names or names that that describe slavic origin. Here are few examples:

    Windischeschenbach (windisch=slavic)
    Marktredwitz or also sometimes Radewitze
    Oberredwitz
    Burgtreswitz
    Seßlach (in Seßlach there was even slavic speaking mission http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Se%C3%9Flach#Geschichte)
    Pechofen
    Pegnitz

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