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  • #346584

    Anonymous

    A call for help to Ingva and other members who like linguistics!

    Bulgarian: славянин
    Macedonian: Словен
    BSCM: Slaven/Sloven
    Slovene: Slovan
    Czecho-Slovak: Slovan
    Upper/Lower Sorbian:Słowjan
    Kashubian: Słowión
    Polish: Słowianin
    Belarusian: славянін
    Ukrainian: слов'янин
    Russian: славянин
    Old Church Slavonic: словѣньскъ (adjective)

    Could not find entries for Rusyn.

    Jiří Rejzek with his Český etymologický slovník gives *slověninъ as the etymological entry for "Slovan". Wiktionary gives the same word. We can safely state that the original, Proto-Slavic word had jať/ě here. But why on Earth do some of the modern Slavic languages disagree with this? Why on Earth does it seem like some of the languages work with slovĘninъ instead? Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak and Upper Sorbian all show their typical reflexes of ę as far as I know. They have different reflexes for jať and they don't show them here in the word for Slav. All other languages generally show jať reflexes in the word for Slav (but I just quickly checked it, didn't research it deep enough). Am I missing something? What's going on here?

    Also, what is the general consensus on origins of the *slověninъ? Is it really related to *slovo? Because if it would be related, it would have to show the s-stem or? Something like *SlověSeninъ (because the original declension of slovo was slovo, gen. sloveSa). But no modern or extinct Slavic language shows us this. Could the word *slověninъ be related to some other word(s) instead? Which ones?

    Please, provide sources, if possible.

    #432370

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Also, what is the general consensus on origins of the *slověninъ? Is it really related to *slovo? Because if it would be related, it would have to show the s-stem or? Something like *SlověSeninъ (because the original declension of slovo was slovo, gen. sloveSa). But no modern or extinct Slavic language shows us this. Could the word *slověninъ be related to some other word(s) instead? Which ones?

    Forum member Martinjak, who is sadly however unactive for some time now, once told me one posible theory that exist among some scholars which is that root word for Sloveni, Slovenin….. might steem from hydronym, thats back when Slavs were still swamp dweling frogs.

    So yeah it just might well be Europes biggest language group has its name from some obscure piss creek like Lithuanians are believed to, by some; ;D

    [img width=700 height=525]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/02/Lietava001.jpg” />

    #432371

    Anonymous

    In Kashubian it is Słowión.

    But I don't understand, where you see "ę" here.

    #432372

    Anonymous

    Take a look at Eastern Slavic languages.

    Belarusian: славянін
    Ukrainian: слов'янин
    Russian: славянин

    See that я there? я is a typical reflex of PSL *ę in Eastern languages. See Russian ряд/пять/девять (rjad/pjať/devjať) Belarusian рад/пяць/дзевяць (rad/pjać/dzevjać, рад is an exception to this reflex because Belarussian doesn't have a soft r) and Ukrainian ряд/п'ять/дев'ять (rjad/p'jať/dev'jať). Reflex of jať in those languages is different – Russian has е, Ukrainian і and Belarussian е and а. Now compare this with words for Slav (slavjanin, slov'janin, slavjanin), Eastern languages simply don't show like this particular word would come from *slověninъ, rather slovęninъ (or slAvęninъ, hehe). The same goes for Czech, Slovak and Upper Sorbian. Likewise, they don't show the reflex we would expect here – my question is, why? Is this particular word some exception? Or did they just simply mess something up?

    #432373

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Take a look at Eastern Slavic languages.

    Belarusian: славянін
    Ukrainian: слов'янин
    Russian: славянин

    See that я there? я is a typical reflex of PSL *ę in Eastern languages.

    In Polish for instance we have "ia" in "Słowianin" as well. This is the same sound as cyriliic "я". But "ę" is different. In early cyrillic there was this sound, and it was called "little yus" – Ѧ.
    Yat is not a reflection of "ę" sound. Yus (both, great and little) was present along with yat.

    Quote:
    See Russian ряд/пять/девять (rjad/pjať/devjať) Belarusian рад/пяць/дзевяць (rad/pjać/dzevjać, рад is an exception to this reflex because Belarussian doesn't have a soft r) and Ukrainian ряд/п'ять/дев'ять (rjad/p'jať/dev'jať). Reflex of jať in those languages is different – Russian has е, Ukrainian і and Belarussian е and а. Now compare this with words for Slav (slavjanin, slov'janin, slavjanin), Eastern languages simply don't show like this particular word would come from *slověninъ, rather slovęninъ (or slAvęninъ, hehe). The same goes for Czech, Slovak and Upper Sorbian. Likewise, they don't show the reflex we would expect here – my question is, why? Is this particular word some exception? Or did they just simply mess something up?

    Well, maybe someone else would answer that question. For me "yat" has nothing to do with "ę" or "yus".

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