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  • #345011

    Anonymous

    Did the Romans have a big impact on Slavic designs? Or did they keep their traditional ones? Are there any examples of Roman influence or art in heavily Slavic areas?

    #409510

    Anonymous

    I doubt it, as far as I know Romans had VERY little contact with Slavs. South Slavs are quite closer related to Romans/Italians and Greeks in that manner and I'm not sure if we even have many things from that. Coastal Croatia does have a lot of Roman architecture, but I guess thats because the region was Roman once.

    #409511

    Anonymous

    After looking at the textile and symbols shown in 2 threads I didn't see much if anything that I could reasonably say was Roman. 

    #409512

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Did the Romans have a big impact on Slavic designs? Or did they keep their traditional ones? Are there any examples of Roman influence or art in heavily Slavic areas?

    In South Slavic countries at least. Not really huge influence I would say, but for example traditional footwear Opanak are Roman invention. Maybe the most concerns old architecture(if we count in both Eastern Roman Empire as part of Roman influence).

    #409513

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Did the Romans have a big impact on Slavic designs? Or did they keep their traditional ones? Are there any examples of Roman influence or art in heavily Slavic areas?

    Slavs almost never contacted Romans, in fact the only Europeans closely related to slavs were balts and germanics, with the rest (romans, Greeks and Celts) being very distant.

    Quote:
    I doubt it, as far as I know Romans had VERY little contact with Slavs. South Slavs are quite closer related to Romans/Italians and Greeks in that manner and I'm not sure if we even have many things from that. Coastal Croatia does have a lot of Roman architecture, but I guess thats because the region was Roman once.

    that's true.I think that in case of southern Slavs, Dalmatians have the closest culture to italian or Greek.

    central Greece:
    image

    Dalmatia:
    image

    #409514

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Slavs almost never contacted Romans, in fact the only Europeans closely related to slavs were balts and germanics, with the rest (romans, Greeks and Celts) being very distant.

    And again with this. Celto-Greek fairy tales aside, Slavs are not significantly related to Germanics, and maybe not even to Balts (except maybe for Belarusians)

    There are several theories regarding this, as you can see –

    [img width=400 height=100]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/57/Balto-Slavic_theories.jpg” />

    Balts are pretty much unique in their culture and different to us regarding mentality (A trait you seem to overemphasize often), otherwise instead of Slavorum we would have Baltoslavorum.

    #409515

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    And again with this. Celto-Greek fairy tales aside, Slavs are not significantly related to Germanics, and maybe not even to Balts (except maybe for Belarusians)

    There are several theories regarding this, as you can see –

    [img width=400 height=100]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/57/Balto-Slavic_theories.jpg” />

    Balts are pretty much unique in their culture and different to us regarding mentality (A trait you seem to overemphasize often), otherwise instead of Slavorum we would have Baltoslavorum.

    well, i am not celto-Greek, considering that i have 0% celtic ancestry.

    Anyway, I have read the term "baltoslavs" very often, a term which refers to the common ancestors of slavs and balts 2-3 or more thousands years BC.

    OF course today an average south slav has not many (or possibly nothing) in common culturally with balts.The reason that i overemphasize mentality is because this is my job, as long as i am a student of psychology

    so, in your opinion there are not "closer relatives" to slavs, or i am wrong?

    #409516

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    The reason that i overemphasize mentality is because this is my job, as long as i am a student of psychology :P

    Ah yes, that makes sense.

    Quote:
    so, in your opinion there are not "closer relatives" to slavs, or i am wrong?

    According to some theories, Balto-Slavic languages split much earlier than 1000 BCE, according to those theories the morphological, lexical and phonological similarities are not due to common genesis or evolution of the two, but rather happened accidentally.

    This line of thought is very common among Baltic linguist (Endzelīns and Zinkevičius); some would like to think that it is politically motivated (Balts and their scholars don't exactly "love" Slavs), but the exactly thing same can be said of the Balto-Slavic theory.

    And of course Belarusians are a special case, I am not sure tho it is possible Baltic tribes played a role in their ethnogenesis, and not to speak of litvinism etc. etc.

    #409517

    Anonymous

    Anyway, I have read the term "baltoslavs" very often, a term which refers to the common ancestors of slavs and balts 2-3 or more thousands years BC.

    Nope. Balto-Slavic is a language ( supposedly) that preceded Slavic. Now historians aren't even confident of the 'Balto' part. They just call it proto-Slavic. Balto-Slavic never refered to a group of people. 

    #409518

    Anonymous

    Is there anything  that we can directly attribute to Roman influence among the Slavs? I know there was trade of Baltic amber to Rome.  Was trade carried out by middle men or was the trade mostly after the Roman occupation?

    #409519

    Anonymous

    Well roman influence. You should specify it. Because Byznatine Emire is also roman culture nevertheless it has different name. And as we all know Byzantines had pretty big influence on South Slavs.

    #409520

    Anonymous

    Design is a good indicator of influence or at least shared art stuffs.  If there was no sharing of designs I wasn't sure if there was any interaction between the 2 cultures.  Example:  If a woman sees a new design that she likes she is going to have her husband buy it for her or try to re-create it for herself.  This would be interaction via trade or seeing how other people dressed.  Weave patterns were shared among peoples as were clothing and hair styles.  I wondered if there was a significant change in any of the traditional designs after contact with Rome.

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