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  • #345014

    Anonymous

    Rulers of Bosnia and Herzegovina

    The rulers of Bosnia are shown in Chapter 1 of this document.  No information has been found on rulers, if any, of Bosnia before the late 12th century.  It is assumed that the territory was at that time under the jurisdiction of the kingdom of Croatia.  Bosnia had been nominally annexed by Hungary in 1102, when King Kálmán annexed Croatia.  After the Byzantines defeated the Hungarians at Zemun in 1167, Bosnia was recognised as part of the Byzantine empire.  After [1180/81], when Hungary occupied Dalmatia and southern Croatia, it also claimed Bosnia.  In 1185, Emperor Isaakios II recognised Hungary’s claim to Bosnia, although there is no evidence that the Hungarians occupied any part of the territory at the time. The first known Ban of Bosnia was Kulin.  Between his death in [1204] and the accession of Matija Ninoslav as Ban in [1232] the names of the rulers of Bosnia are unknown.  Another gap in our knowledge of Bosnian rulers follows the death of Matija Ninoslav in [1250] and the late 1280s when the sons of Uban Prijezda (possible first cousin of Matija) are recorded as Bans of Bosnia, although it is probable that the territory was controlled by Hungary during this period and had no independent rulers.

    Ban Stjepan Kotromanić asserted full Bosnian independence by 1330, freeing the territory from both Hungarian and Serbian control.  Europäische Stammtafeln suggests possible family relationships between Stjepan and other early bans of Bosnia.  However, no indication has been found that the title was at that time hereditary within the same family.  It is possible that the different Bans were chiefs of local clans who asserted temporary dominance over each other from time to time and that they were not related at all.  Stjepan Tvrtko was crowned king of Bosnia in 1377, although it appears that the title was derived only from his claim to the kingdom of Serbia (where he was never able to assert control) and that there was never a separate recognition of Bosnia as a kingdom.  A royal crown was finally granted to Bosnia by the papacy in 1461, but this was only two years before the final Ottoman occupation.  After the extinction in the male line of the family of the kings of Bosnia in 1463, the title was claimed both by the Counts of Celje [Cilly] (see the document CROATIA) and the Přemyslid Dukes of Troppau (see SILESIA), both of whom were descended from the Bosnian kings in the female line.

    The rulers of Hercegovina are shown in Chapter 2 of this document.  The territory neighbouring Bosnia which was later known as Hercegovina developed along different lines from Bosnia.  Rulers of Hercegovina are first recorded in the early 10th century, when the territory was known as “Zahumlje”.  The De Administrando Imperio of Konstantinos Porphyrogenetos records that the Romans dominated “Zachlumorum terræ” which was colonised by Emperor Diocletian, but later subjugated by “Abaribus”.  The same source names “proconsulis et patricii Michaelis Busebutze Zachlumorum principis filii” as ruler of “Zachluma”, presumably in the early 10th century, the titles accorded to him showing that Zahumlje must have been under Byzantine suzerainty at the time.  The first dynasty of Hercegovinan rulers became extinct in the mid-11th century, after which the territory fell to Serbia.  Miroslav, brother of Stefan Nemanja Grand Župan of Serbia, was installed as Grand Knez in the late 1160s, when the territory was known as “Hum”.  His probable descendants ruled Hercegovina until Bosnian conquered the territory in [1326].  A third dynasty came to power in [1358] when Vojislav Vojinović was installed as Knez of Hum by Serbia, but the family lost control in 1373.  Sandalj Hranić Kosača was installed as Knez of Zahumlje and Grand Voivode of Bosnia after 1418.  His nephew of the same name assumed the title “Herceg” of Hum and later that of Duke of St Sava, in honour of the Serbian saint, a title which apparently gave rise to the territory’s last name Hercegovina, which means simply “the duke’s lands”.  Hercegovina was finally conquered by the Ottomans in 1481, although the title “Duke of St Sava” was borne by the family’s descendants well into the 16th century.

    Primary sources for Bosnia and Hercegovina are sparse.  Serbian and Bosnian charters, dated between the late 12th and late 15th centuries, are collected in the mid-19th century Monumenta Serbica. The documents are written in Serbian, but are headed by a brief description in Latin which includes some genealogical details.  It is possible that more information is included in the body of the documents but these have not been studied due to the language difficulties.

    Source

    #409525

    Anonymous
    [size=12pt]Bans of Bosnia (12th Century)[/size]

    SLAVOGAST (after 1154)
    [hr]
    "Dessa magnus comes terre Zachulmie" donated "ecclesiam s. Pancratii" to "monasterio Iacromensi" by charter dated to 1151, confirmed by "Banus Slauogast cum filiis et omnibus Zachulmie nobilibus" by charter dated 1 Dec 1154.

    BORIS (after 1156)
    [hr]
    "Banus Boritius" confirmed donations of "ecclesiæ s. Pancratii" to "Iacromensis monasterii" by charter dated 7 Aug 1156.  A charter dated 1209 of Endre II King of Hungary confirmed the possessions of the Knights Templar, including "villam…Erdel" originally granted by "banus Boricius de Bozna…ex concessione regis Stephani" and confirmed by "…pater noster Bela rex…eiusdem Boricii nepotes".

    KULIN (after 1204)
    [hr]
    A charter dated 1180 issued by "Theobaldus…Alexandro PP III sanctæ sedis missus" names "Culin magno bano Bosniæ".  He maintained good relations with Dubrovnik, issuing a charter in 1189 allowing the town's merchants to trade in Bosnia duty free: “Kulin, Bosnæ banus” made peace with “Ragusio, comite Gervasio” concerning the Ragusan merchants in Bosnia, dated 29 Aug 1189[11].  "Vulcanus…Diocliæ et Dalmatiæ rex" accused "Bacilinus [Ban Culinus] cum uxore sua et cum sorore sua, quæ fuit defuncti Mirosclavi Chelmensis" of heresy in a letter written to Pope Innocent III dated Sep 1199. This resulted in the Pope removing Bosnia from the ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the archbishop of Dubrovnik and transferring it to the bishopric of Bar, which was restored as an archbishopric.  Hungary attempted to foment opposition within Bosnia with a view to assuming overlordship, but Kulin reaffirmed his loyalty to the Pope at a church council which he called 6 Apr 1203 at Bolino Polje.  The name of his successor is not known. The name of Kulin´s wife is not known.  Kulin & his wife had one child:


      [li]son .  Fine records that the son of Kulin visited Hungary to confirm the Bolino Polje resolutions, and suggests that he may have succeeded his father as Ban of Bosnia.  The primary sources on which this information is based have not yet been identified. [/li]

    [hr]

    #409526

    Anonymous

    Where are you getting this information from?

    #409527

    Anonymous
    [size=12pt]Bans of Bosnia (Kotromanić)[/size]

    COTROMANUS
    [hr]
    He is named in Europäische Stammtafeln as comes of István III King of Hungary in 1163, but the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified.

    RADONJA (Knez 1249)
    [hr]
    Europäische Stammtafeln suggests that Radonja, Ugrin and Matija Ninoslav were brothers and that they were grandsons of Cotromanus.  The basis for this hypothesis is not known.

    UGRIN (Knez. Ban of Mačva-Bosnia 1249-1279/80)
    [hr]
    Europäische Stammtafeln suggests that Radonja, Ugrin and Matija Ninoslav were brothers and that they were grandsons of Cotromanus.  The basis for this hypothesis is not known.

    MATIJA NINOSLAV STJEPAN (after Mar 1249)
    [hr]
    A charter dated 10 Oct 1233 confirmed that Pope Gregory IX received "Ninosclavum ducem Bosnæ et terræ eius" under his protection.  Despite this, the Pope in 1234 called on the Hungarians to crusade against "heretics" in Bosnia.  The campaign actively began in 1235 and resulted in Hungarian occupation of a large part of Bosnia, until they were obliged to withdraw in the face of the Mongol threat in 1241.  The Dominicans, who followed in the Hungarians´ wake, erected a cathedral in Vrhbosna (Sarajevo) and the Dominican Ponsa was appointed bishop of Bosnia and Hum.  “Matthaeus Ninoslav, Bosnæ magnus banus” confirmed the privileges given by “Kulino bano” to “Joanni Dandulo, Ragusii comiti” by charter dated to 1234/40.  “Matthaeus Ninoslav, Bosnæ magnus banus” promised eternal peace with Ragusa by charter dated 22 Mar 1240.  “Matthaeus Stephanus, Bosnæ magnus banus” promised peace with Ragusa by charter dated Mar 1249.  After years of pressure from Hungary, the Pope reassigned ecclesiastical control of the Bosnian church from the archbishop of Dubrovnik to the Hungarian archbishopric of Kalocsa in 1252, but this marked the end of Catholic influence in Bosnia as the newly appointed Bishop of Bosnia resided in Djakovo in Slavonia.  The names of Ninoslav's successors as Bans of Bosnia are not known.

    UBAN PRIJEZDA (1287, after 8 May)
    [hr]
    Europäische Stammtafeln suggests that Uban Prijezda was the grandson of Cotromanus, descended from a different son from Radonja, Ugrin and Matija Ninoslav.  The basis for this hypothesis is not known.  From Zemunik/Zemljanik.  A charter dated 10 Oct 1233 issued by Pope Gregory IX confirmed the allegiance to the church of "Urbanum dictum Priesda, cognatum ducis Ninoslavi".  Although he is alleged to have ruled over Bosnia as the vassal of Hungary, all the territory he is documented as controlling was to the north of the Banate of Bosnia and to the west of the Banate of Mačva.  He was granted the county of Novska by Béla IV King of Hungary before 1255. The name of Uban Prijezda's wife is not known.  Uban Prijezda & his wife had four children:


      [li]PRIJEZDA (1295) – The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Zupan of Zemunik 1267.  Ban of Bosnia 1287-1295.[/li]
      [li]
      STJEPAN Kotroman (1314) – The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Ban of Upper and Lower Bosnia 1290-1299/1302.[/li]
      [li]VUK – The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 1287.[/li]
      [li]daughter – The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. Before 1287.[/li]

    [hr]

    #409528

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Where are you getting this information from?

    There's a source in the bottom-right of every post about the topic.

    #409529

    Anonymous

    STJEPAN Kotroman 1290-1302, STJEPAN Kotromanić 1318-1353, STJEPAN DABIŠA 1391-1395, GRUBA 1395-1398
    [hr]
    STJEPAN Kotroman, son of UBAN PRIJEZDA Ban in northern Bosnia & his wife — (1314).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Ban of Upper and Lower Bosnia 1290-1299/1302. His territory was attacked in 1299 by the Šubić family of Bribir, Paul I Šubić being referred to as Ban of Bosnia in 1299.  Stjepan Kotroman appears to have fought the Šubići in 1302 on the banks of the Drina, although the outcome is not known.  As Paul I Šubić is referred to as "Ban of All Bosnia" in 1305, it is likely that Stjepan Kotroman was defeated.  From 1312 to 1314, Stjepan was a vassal of the Nemanjić family of Serbia and of the Counts of Bribir.

    JELISAVETA of Serbia, daughter of STEFAN DRAGUTIN King of Serbia & his wife Katalin of Hungary (1331).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  Regent of Bosnia until Apr 1314, after which she fled with her son to Dubrovnik. Stjepan & his wife had six children:


      [li]STJEPAN Kotromanić (28 Sep 1353, bur Visoko, Franciscan monastery) – The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  After his father's death, he fled with his mother to Dubrovnik. He was Ban of Bosnia in the central Visoko-Zenica area in 1318. He appears to have enjoyed good relations with the Šubići until 1322 when civil war broke out within the Šubić family, during which time Kotromanić supported Károly II King of Hungary.  Stjepan Kotromanić added Soli and Usora to his territories in 1324, which had been previously held by his maternal grandfather.  Ban of Upper and Lower Bosnia 1322-1353.  He annexed most of Hum in 1326, forcing out the Branivojevići brothers who had assumed control during the period of confusion which followed the death of King Milutin of Serbia.  By 1330, Kotromanić had more than doubled the size of Bosnia and had asserted full de facto independence from its neighbours.

    “Stephanus, Bosnæ banus” confirmed peace with Ragusa by charter dated 23 Oct 1332.  In 1337, the Pope called on Nelipac of Knin and the Šubići of Bribir to help the Franciscans in their work in Bosnia, accusing the Ban and the nobles of aiding "heretics", although Kotromanić appears to have forestalled any potential crusade with help from the king of Hungary who forbade any attack on Bosnia.  Fine suggests that this action was triggered by Nelipac to advance his own ambitions, as the Franciscans only became active in Bosnia in 1339/40 after having been well received by Ban Kotromanić.  In 1342 the Franciscans established their Vicariat of Bosnia, which became a base for their activities in south-eastern Europe, and Ban Kotromanić converted to Catholicism by 1347.  Tsar Stefan Dušan of Serbia invaded Bosnia in 1350, aiming to regain control of Hum, but Ban Kotromanić avoided confrontation by retiring to the mountains.  He opened Bosnia's silver and lead mines, which led to economic development and increased commercial contacts with the coast.  Betrothed (1319, Papal dispensation 4o 18 Jul 1319) to — von Ortenburg, daughter of MEINHARD I Graf von Ortenburg [in Carinthia] & his wife —.  Pope John XXII issued a dispensation for the marriage of "Stephano, Stephani bani Bosnensis filio" and "filia Meinhardi comitis de Orthenborch", who were "in quarto gradu consanguinitatis coniuncta", dated 18 Jul 1319.  m (Jun 1324) ELŹBIETA, daughter of KAZIMIERZ of Kujavia Prince of Inowraclaw and Gnesen [Piast] & his wife — (1315/20-after 22 Aug 1345).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. Stjepan Kotromanić & his wife had two children:


      [li]son (-young).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.[/li]
      [li]JELISAVETA (1340-in prison Novigrad near Zadar, Dalmatia shortly before 16 Jan 1387). The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  Her father refused a proposal from Tsar Stefan Dušan of Serbia for her marriage to his son, following the Serbian invasion of Bosnia in 1350.  Regent in Hungary and Poland on the death of her husband.  She was taken prisoner with her daughter Maria by Jan Horvat after visiting Djakovo in late 1386, and taken to a castle in Novigrad near Zadar where she was strangled in front of her daughter.  m (Krakow 20 Jun 1353) as his second wife, LAJOS I King of Hungary and Poland, son of KÁROLY I King of Hungary & his third wife Elźbieta of Poland (4/5 Mar 1326-Tarnow/Tyrnau 10/11 Sep 1382, bur Székesfehérvár, church of Notre Dame).[/li]

    [/li]
    [li]VLADISLAV Kotromanić (1354).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Co-Regent of Bosnia 1323-1331.  Regent of Bosnia end 1353-early 1354.[/li]
    [li]NINOSLAV Kotromanić – The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 1310/14.  m —.  The name of Ninoslav´s wife is not known.  Ninoslav & his wife had one possible child:


      [li]MARIJA (1333-27 Apr 1403, bur Bad Überkirchen). The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  m (before 26 Apr 1352) ULRICH Graf von Helfenstein (murdered 12 May 1372).[/li]

    [/li]
    [li]son .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. 1331. [/li]
    [li]KATELINA (before 1355).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  m (before 1338) NIKOLA Zupan of Zahumlje, son of BOGDAN Zupan of Hum Nemanjić & his wife —.[/li]
    [li]MARIJA – A charter dated 26 Apr 1352 names "Ludovicus Nyklynum filium Laurentii et fratrem eius" who married "Mariam sororem domini Stephani ducis Boznensis…domino Helsenneerio" at "civitatem Pazzowye". It is unclear from this text whether "Ludovicus" or his brother was the husband of Maria.  It is assumed that the marriage took place well before the date of the charter as, at that time, any sister of Ban Stjepan would have been old for marriage.  m (Passau) —. [/li]

    STJEPAN Dabiša (7 Sep 1395).  Fine suggests that Stjepan Dabiša was related to Tvrtko but says that the precise relationship is not known. Europäische Stammtafeln suggests that he was an illegitimate son of Ninoslav Kotromanić, but it is not known whether this is any more than a guess.  He is first mentioned in 1358.  He succeeded in 1391 as STJEPAN DABIŠA King of Bosnia, maybe chosen because he was elderly and weak, but possibly also because he was the oldest member of the family.  “Rex Bosnæ Stephanus Dabiša” confirmed the privileges of the Ragusans, with the consent of “ipsius uxore Helena”, by charter dated 17 Jun 1392, witnessed by "vojvoda Hrvoje, vojvoda Usoræ Vlatko, comes Stipoje Hrvatinić, comes Radosav Prebinić, comes Dobrosav Divošević, tepačija Batalo, comes Gojak Dragosalić, župan Tvrdislav Tuica, comes Vlčihna Vlatković, comes Voisav Voevodić, comes Vlkac Nartičić, župan Radoje Radosalić, župan Juraj Tihčinović, comes palatinus Stanac Priekušić". The Bosnian state held together as the nobles decided that it was in their interests to cooperate with each other.  Under threat from Zsigmond King of Hungary, King Dabiša accepted Hungarian suzerainty in 1393, renounced the Croatian/Dalmatian kingship which had been claimed by his predecessor, and returned to the parts of Croatia and Dalmatia conquered by King Tvrtko to Hungary. 

    JELENA Gruba of the Nikolići of Hum (after 5 Mar 1399).  “Rex Bosnæ Stephanus Dabiša” confirmed the privileges of the Ragusans, with the consent of “ipsius uxore Helena”, by charter dated 17 Jun 1392. After her husband's death in 1395, the Bosnian nobles elected her as GRUBA Queen of Bosnia.  “Helena, Bosnæ regina, Stephani Dabišæ uxor” abolished customs taxes imposed on the Ragusans “in Maslina prope Ston et in Slano” by charter dated 13 May 1397. She was deposed in 1398 in favour of Ostoja.  Stjepan Dabiša & his wife had one child:


      [li]STANA

    “Stephanus Dabiša, Bosnæ rex” granted “pagum Velijake” to “filiæ Stanæ ad vitam” and after her death to “Georgio Radivojević et posteris eius” by charter dated 26 Apr 1395.  m DJURADJ Radivojević Knez in Krajina Makareka (after 23 Feb 1408). [/li]
    [hr]

    #409530

    Anonymous

    Bosnia ( or rather the territory we call BiH today) had rulers before 1102 AD though. :P Interesting page , I'll give it a read when I get some time.  Svevlad , I never asked you. You're a Bosniak cleary by your own description. Are you also Moslem ( at least by tradition?) What part of BiH are you from?

    #409531

    Anonymous

    VLADISLAV Kotromanić 1353-1354
    [hr]
    VLADISLAV Kotromanić, son of STJEPAN Kotroman Ban of Bosnia & his wife Jelisaveta of Serbia (1354).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Co-Regent of Bosnia 1323-1331.  Regent of Bosnia end 1353-early 1354.  It is not known why his son succeeded as Ban of Bosnia in 1353 instead of Vladislav. m (Klis 1338 before 17 Aug)

    JELENA Subić, daughter of JURAJ II Subić Count of Bribir & his wife — (after 10 Apr 1378).  "Tvrtko banus Bosnæ…cum…iuvene Vuk fratre…ac…domina Helena genetrice" confirmed the privileges of Ragusa by charter dated 1 Sep 1355. The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  "Laurentius Celsi dux Venetiarum" declared "Tvrtkum totius Bossine banum comitem Wolf eius fratrem et Helenam eorum genetricem" as citizens of Venice by charter dated 7 Sep 1364. Pope Gregory IX confirmed the donation by "Tuertko banus Boznen…cum…Stephano eius fratre iuniore bano Boznen nec non…Helena ipsorum banorum genetrice" to "ecclesiæ cathedrali sanctorum Petri et Pauli" by bull dated 31 Oct 1374.  “Stephanus Tvrtko, Bosnæ rex…cum matre Helena et coniuge Dorothea” confirmed the privileges granted previously to the Ragusans by “Bosnæ et Serbiæ regibus” by charter dated 10 Apr 1378. Vladislav & his wife had three children:


      [li]STJEPAN Tvrtko (1338-10 Mar 1391) – The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  He succeeded his uncle in 1353 as Ban of Bosnia.

    "Tvrtko banus Bosnæ…cum…iuvene Vuk fratre…ac…domina Helena genetrice" confirmed the privileges of Ragusa by charter dated 1 Sep 1355. He was crowned Stjepan Tvrtko I King (Kralj) of Bosnia.[/li]
    [li]STJEPAN Vuk (after 31 Oct 1374). "Tvrtko banus Bosnæ…cum…iuvene Vuk fratre…ac…domina Helena genetrice" confirmed the privileges of Ragusa by charter dated 1 Sep 1355. Knez 1353-1369.  "Laurentius Celsi dux Venetiarum" declared "Tvrtkum totius Bossine banum comitem Wolf eius fratrem et Helenam eorum genetricem" as citizens of Venice by charter dated 7 Sep 1364. He was installed as Ban of Bosnia in 1366 in place of his older brother after a rebellion by the nobility, but made peace with his brother in 1367 and surrendered the Banate in return for being confirmed in his own holdings.  He went into exile later in the year, unsuccessfully sought outside help to regain his position, and eventually concluded a more permanent peace in 1374. He converted to Roman Catholicism in 1367. Pope Urban V requested Lajos King of Hungary to protect "Stephanum banum Bosnæ iuniorem", persecuted by "frater, senior banus", by letter dated 14 Dec 1369. Pope Gregory IX confirmed the donation by "Tuertko banus Boznen…cum…Stephano eius fratre iuniore bano Boznen nec non…Helena ipsorum banorum genetrice" to "ecclesiæ cathedrali sanctorum Petri et Pauli" by bull dated 31 Oct 1374.[/li]
    [li]KATARINA – The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. 1377/96.  Her son, Herman II Count of Celje, inherited the kingdom of Bosnia by treaty 2 Sep 1427.  m (1362) HERMAN I Count of Celje (Cilly), son of FREDERIC I Count of Celje (Cilly) & his wife Diemut von Wallsee (21 Mar 1385).[/li]

    STJEPAN TVRTKO I 1353-1391, STJEPAN TVRTKO II 1404-1443
    [hr]
    STJEPAN Tvrtko, son of VLADISLAV Kotromanić Knez of Bosnia & his wife Jelena Subić (1338-10 Mar 1391).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  He succeeded his uncle in 1353 as Ban of Bosnia.  "Tvrtko banus Bosnæ…cum…iuvene Vuk fratre…ac…domina Helena genetrice" confirmed the privileges of Ragusa by charter dated 1 Sep 1355. The nobles asserted their autonomy after his accession, splitting the strong state which his uncle had established into separate units.  In 1357, Lájos King of Hungary compelled Ban Stjepan Tvrtko to surrender most of western Hum as a belated dowry for his marriage to Kotromanić's daughter, in return for recognising him as ruler of Bosnia and Usora as the vassal of Hungary.  King Lájos invaded northern Bosnia in 1363, but Ban Tvrtko successfully defended himself against these incursions.  "Laurentius Celsi dux Venetiarum" declared "Tvrtkum totius Bossine banum comitem Wolf eius fratrem et Helenam eorum genetricem" as citizens of Venice by charter dated 7 Sep 1364.  After a rebellion in 1366 in favour of his younger brother, Tvrtko sought refuge at the Hungarian court but was restored in 1367 after making peace with his brother.  “Tvrtko, Bosnæ banus” confirmed the privileges granted by "bane Stephano patruo suo" to the Ragusans by charter dated 1 Jun 1367.  Allied with Lazar Hrebljanović, he defeated Nikola Altomanović, nominal Knez of Hum, in 1373 and acquired his lands in western Hum.  Pope Gregory IX confirmed the donation by "Tuertko banus Boznen…cum…Stephano eius fratre iuniore bano Boznen nec non…Helena ipsorum banorum genetrice" to "ecclesiæ cathedrali sanctorum Petri et Pauli" by bull dated 31 Oct 1374.  He was crowned STJEPAN TVRTKO I King (Kralj) of Bosnia and Serbia at Mileševo 26 Oct 1377, deriving his kingship rights from his claim to the Serbian throne although he never established any role for himself in Serbia. “Stephanus Tvrtko, Bosnæ rex…cum matre Helena et coniuge Dorothea” confirmed the privileges granted previously to the Ragusans by “Bosnæ et Serbiæ regibus” by charter dated 10 Apr 1378, in the presence of "župan Branko Pribinić, comes palatinus Vlkosav Stefković, Dobrašin Stefanović, vojevoda Vlatko Vlković, comes Vlkašin Milatović, comes Priboje Mostnović, župan Bielijak Seković".  On the death of Djuradj Balšić in 1379, Stjepan Tvrtko annexed the coastal land along the Gulf of Kotor except the town of Kotor itself.  Tvrtko supported Jan Horvat Ban of Mačva in his rebellion against Maria Queen of Hungary, invaded Hungarian Dalmatia in 1387, and conquered large parts of Dalmatia and Croatia.  “Stephanus Tvrtko, Bosnæ rex” agreed a treaty with the Ragusans “contra omnes, excepta Hungariæ regina Maria” by charter dated 9 Apr 1387.  In 1390, he started to call himself King of Croatia and Dalmatia.  On Tvrtko's death, he was succeeded by his cousin Stjepan Dabiša, but Hrvoje Vukčić emerged as the strongest local figure, replacing Tvrtko as overlord in Dalmatia and Croatia with the approval of Ladislas King of Sicily, who was then a claimant to the Hungarian throne.

    m firstly — – The chronology of the family of Stjepan Tvrtko´s wife Doroteja suggests that it is unlikely that she was the mother of his son Stjepan Tvrtko II.  Europäische Stammtafeln states that he was illegitimate, but the basis for this is not known.

    m secondly (1376/84) DOROTEJA, daughter of IVAN STRACIMIR of Bulgaria Prince of Vidin & his wife Anna Slava Bassarab of Wallachia (before Aug 1390).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  Lájos King of Hungary retained her and her sister at the Hungarian court after her father was restored in Vidin in 1370, later arranging her marriage. “Stephanus Tvrtko, Bosnæ rex…cum matre Helena et coniuge Dorothea” confirmed the privileges granted previously to the Ragusans by “Bosnæ et Serbiæ regibus” by charter dated 10 Apr 1378.

    Stjepan Tvrtko I & his first wife had one child:


      [li]STJEPAN Tvrtko (Nov 1443) – His parentage is confirmed by the various documents which name him

    “Tvrtko Tvrtković, Bosnæ rex”, see below.  Citizen of Venice 1404.  He was elected in 1404 to succeed as STJEPAN TVRTKO II King of Bosnia, supported in particular by Hrvoje Vukčić, the deputy of Lászlo King of Hungary in Croatia and Dalmatia.  The Ragusians accepted “regem Bosnæ Stephanum Tvrtko Tvrtković” among the Ragusian nobles and granted him “domum in urbe et terram in Primorje” by charter dated 22 Sep 1405.  Hungarian raids on Bosnia continued, aimed at restoring Ostoja who continued to receive the support of King Zsigmond, culminating in the battle of Dobor in Usora in Sep 1408 at which Zsigmond defeated the Bosnian nobility.  King Stjepan Tvrtko II was deposed in favour of Ostoja by the end of 1409.  He was proclaimed king of Bosnia by the Ottomans in 1414, but after their victory over Hungarian troops near Lašva in Aug 1415 they abandoned him and transferred their support to Ostoja.  He was restored once more in Jul 1420, with the support of Sandalj Hranić Kosača and the Ottomans, was crowned in Aug 1421 and established himself at Visoko. “Tvrtko Tvrtković, Bosnæ rex” confirmed donations made by “vojevoda Sandalj” by charter dated 16 Aug 1420.  “Stephanus Tvrtko Tvrtković, Bosnæ rex” confirmed the privileges of the Ragusans granted by “patre Tvrtko et ab Ostoja” by charter dated 18 Aug 1421.  Faced with the prospect of further Ottoman attacks, he made an alliance with Hungary in 1425/26.  The Ottomans considered this a mark of defiance and forced Tvrtko to submit to Ottoman suzerainty in 1426, although they had withdrawn from Bosnia by Aug 1426.  Tvrtko turned to Hungary for help, but the Hungarians insisted that he accept Herman Count of Cilli as his heir to Bosnia, to which he agreed despite active opposition from Bosnian nobles.  Hungary intervened to support Tvrtko against Radivoj, who had declared himself rival king and controlled eastern Bosnia and Hum, but Tvrtko retreated to the Hungarian court in late 1434, although he returned to Bosnia in Apr 1435.  He was forced back to Hungary in 1436 by further Ottoman raids, but after secret negotiations to accept Ottoman suzerainty once more returned to Bosnia as king in mid-1436.  Betrothed (9 Apr 1428) to DOROTTYA Garay, daughter of JÁNOS Garay Ban of Usora & his wife Jadwiga of Kujavia (Piast).  This marriage was arranged to confirm Tvrtko's alliance with Hungary.[/li]
    [li]STJEPAN Ostoja (Sep 1418) – He is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln as the possible son of King Stjepan Tvrtko I, but according to Fine his precise relationship to the family is not known.  He was elected in 1398 by the Bosnian nobility as STJEPAN OSTOJA King of Bosnia after Queen Gruba was deposed.[/li]
    [li]JELENA (2 Feb 1434/7 Mar 1435) – Heiress of Bosnia.  m (before 23 Mar 1423) as his third wife, PRZEMKO Duke of Troppau, son of NIKOLAUS II Duke of Troppau Přemyslid & his third wife Jutta von Falkenberg (Piast) (28 Sep 1433). [/li]

    [hr]

    #409532

    Anonymous

    COTROMANUS



    He is named in Europäische Stammtafeln as comes of István III King of Hungary in 1163, but the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified.

    It is believed that this named is based on a German knight under the command of Gotfried. In 1163 Hungarian King Stephen  employed Gotfried to subdue Bosnian Ban Boric due to a Byzantine/Hungarian dispute in which Boric found himself opposing the Byzantines. One of Gotfried's greatest fighters was a man named Cotroman the Goth who was present in the conflict. It's not for certain if this Cotroman is the ancester of the famous Kotromanic dynasty but its our own link to the name in Bosnia.

    #409533

    Anonymous

    STJEPAN OSTOJA 1398-1418, STJEPAN 1418-1420, STJEPAN TOMAŠ 1443-1461, STJEPAN 1461-1463
    [hr]
    STJEPAN Ostoja, son of — (Sep 1418).  He is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln as the possible illegitimate son of King Stjepan Tvrtko I, but according to Fine his precise relationship to the family is not known.  He was elected in 1398 by the Bosnian nobility as STJEPAN OSTOJA King of Bosnia after Queen Gruba was deposed.  “Stephanus Ostoja, Bosnæ rex” waived debts of the Ragusans to “Stephani Tvrtko regis” by charter dated 20 Nov 1398.  He declared his support for Ladislas King of Sicily as claimant to the Hungarian throne.  “Stephanus Ostoja rex Bosnæ cum uxore regina Kujava” confirmed the privileges of the Ragusans by charter dated 5 Feb 1399.  After Pavle Radišić, a member of the Bosnian royal family who had presumably been involved in an unsuccessful plot to seize the throne, had fled to Dubrovnik, Ostoja attacked Dubrovnik's territory after it failed to return the fugitive.  To strengthen his position, in 1403 Ostoja accepted the suzerainty of Zsigmond King of Hungary who was gaining ground against Ladislas in the Hungarian civil war.  These displays of independence on the part of Ostoja caused the Bosnian nobles to depose him in Apr/May 1404, whereupon he fled to the Hungarian court where he received support for an invasion which recaptured Bobovac, where he ruled as puppet king installed by Zsigmond.  He was restored in 1409, and recognised as king once more by Zsigmond in 1410/11.  The Ragusans paid tribute to “Bosnæ regi Ostojæ” and received him and “filium eius Stephanum et stirpem virilem” into the nobility of Ragusa by charter dated 31 Dec 1410.  He was supported by the Ottomans after their victory over Hungarian troops near Lašva in Aug 1415.  m firstly.

    VITAČA, daughter of —.  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.  m secondly (before 5 Feb 1399, repudiated 1415).

    KUJAVA, daughter of — (after 15 Dec 1434).  “Stephanus Ostoja rex Bosnæ cum uxore regina Kujava” confirmed the privileges of the Ragusans by charter dated 5 Feb 1399.  m thirdly (before Oct 1416) as her second husband, JELENA Nelipić, widow of HRVOJE Vukčić Duke of Split Grand Voyvode of Bosnia, sister of IVANIĆ Knez of Cetin and Ban of Croatia, daughter of — (Mar 1422).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and two marriages has not yet been identified. Stjepan Ostoja & his second wife had one child:


      [li]STJEPAN Ostojić (before Apr 1422).  The Ragusans paid tribute to

    “Bosnæ regi Ostojæ” and received him and “filium eius Stephanum et stirpem virilem” into the nobility of Ragusa by charter dated 31 Dec 1410.  He succeeded his father in 1418 as STJEPAN King of Bosnia.  Sandalj Hranić Kosača refused to recognise his accession and with Ottoman help ousted him from power in Jul 1420, restoring Stjepan Tvrtko II in his place. 

    Stjepan Ostoja had two illegitimate children by unknown mistresses:


      [li]RADIVOJ of Komothyn (murdered Jun 1463).  He was legitimated 29 May 1445 by the Pope.  He lived at the Ottoman court until late 1430.  He was supported by Radoslav Pavlović as a rival claimant to the throne in 1431, received the support of Sandalj Hranić Kosača, declared himself king and effectively took control of eastern Bosnia and Hum.  Despite Tvrtko II's temporary withdrawal to the Hungarian court in late 1434, Radivoj did not press his advantage, presumably due to lack of popular support.  He was murdered by the Ottomans.  m (before 19 Jun 1449) as her first husband, KATHARINA von Velike, daughter and heiress of NIKOLA von Velike& his wife —.  The primary source which confirms her parentage and two marriages has not yet been identified.  She married secondly (before 1470) Johann Szencsei in Slavonia.  Radivoj & his wife had three children:

      [li]TRVITKO (murdered Turks 1463).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  He was murdered by the Ottomans. [/li]
      [li]DJURADJ (after 1455).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  [/li]
      [li]MATIJA. The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. 1465.[/li]

    [/li]
    [li]STJEPAN TOMAŠ Ostojić (murdered 10 Jul 1461).  His parentage is confirmed by the document which names him “Stephanus Thomas Ostocić, Bosnæ rex”, see below.  He succeeded in 1443 as STJEPAN TOMAŠ King of Bosnia.  Stefan Vukčić Kosača refused to accept his accession, triggering civil war which persisted until 1446, when peace was sealed by his daughter's marriage to the king.  He converted to Catholicism by 1446.  “Stephanus Thomas Ostocić, Bosnæ rex, Paulo, Marco et Georgio, filiis vojevodæ Ivaniš Dragišić” donated “urbem Ključ” by charter dated 22 Aug 1446.  In 1448, Stefan Vukčić Kosača declared his separation from Bosnia by dropping the title "Vojvoda of Bosnia" and eventually calling himself "Herceg of Saint Sava".  Fighting broke out between him and Bosnia in 1449/50.  The Ottomans increased their attacks, annexing parts of eastern Bosnia, including Vrhbosna (Sarajevo) in 1451.  Stjepan Tomaš seized Sřebrnica and other Serbian towns after the death of Lazar Despot of Serbia in 1458, but made peace with Lazar's widow in 1459 when the marriage was arranged between her daughter and his son.  m firstly (repudiated 1445, marriage annulled in Rome) VOJAČA, daughter of —.  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.  m secondly (Apr 1446) KATARINA, daughter of STEFAN Vukčić Kosača & his first wife Jelena Balša (1424-Rome 25 Oct 1478, bur Ara Coeli).  A charter records the death of “Catharina, Bosnæ regina” 25 Oct 1478.  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  Stjepan Tomaš & his first wife had three children:


      [li]STJEPAN Tomasević (beheaded Jajce Jun 1463).  His parentage is confirmed by the document which names him as

    “Stephanus Tomašević, Bosnæ rex”, see below.  He was created Despot on his marriage, presumably by his mother-in-law although she had no right to grant this title which, according to long tradition, could only by granted by an emperor.  He and his wife escaped to Bosnia after Smederevo was captured by the Ottomans 20 Jun 1459 and the Serbian state was annexed.  He succeeded his father in 1461 as STJEPAN King of Bosnia.  “Stephanus Tomašević, Bosnæ rex” confirmed the privileges of Ragusa by charter dated 23 Nov 1461.  He sought outside help against the Ottomans from the Pope, and also requested a royal crown, which he received from the Papal legate in Nov 1461.  The Ottomans invaded Bosnia in 1463 and captured the king, who was brought before the Sultan and beheaded.  m (Smederevo 1 Apr 1459) JELENA Branković, daughter of LAZAR Branković Despot of Serbia & his wife Helene Palaiologina (1447-in Hungary after 1498).  The Masarelli Vatican manuscript manuscript names (in order) Maria, Militzia and Irene as the children of Lazar & his wife, stating that Maria married the king of Bosnia and had issue.  Theodoros Spandounes names "Maria…la seconda…Miliza…la terza et ultima Erina" as the three daughters of "Lazaro Despoto" and his wife, adding that "Maria" married "rè Stephano di Bossina".  She adopted the name MARIJA on her marriage.  She fled to the coast after Bosnia was annexed by the Ottomans.  According to Runciman, Queen Marija was taken into the harem of a Turkish general.[/li]
    [li]son (aged 14 before 1460).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  [/li]
    [li] son .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Stjepan Tomaš & his second wife had two children:


      [li]ZILMUNT (1456-).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  He was captured by the Ottomans in Jun 1463 and taken to Constantinople, where he converted to Islam.  He served as Sanjak-Beg at Karas in Asia Minor in 1487.  According to

    Europäische Stammtafeln, Zilmunt had descendants although no details are given. [/li]
    [li]STIPANA (Katharina) (1460-).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  She was captured by the Turks in Jun 1463 and became a Moslem. [/li]

    [/li]

    [/li]

    [hr]

    #409534

    Anonymous
    Quote:

    It is believed that this named is based on a German knight under the command of Gotfried. In 1163 Hungarian King Stephen  employed Gotfried to subdue Bosnian Ban Boric due to a Byzantine/Hungarian dispute in which Boric found himself opposing the Byzantines. One of Gotfried's greatest fighters was a man named Cotroman the Goth who was present in the conflict. It's not for certain if this Cotroman is the ancester of the famous Kotromanic dynasty but its our own link to the name in Bosnia.

    Where did you hear this? So Kotroman could possible be a non-Slav?

    #409535

    Anonymous
    [size=12pt]Voivodes of Bosnia (Kosača)[/size]

    [hr]
    VUK, Kosača
    m —.  The name of Vuk´s wife is not known.
    Vuk & his wife had two children:


      [li]VLATKO Vuković (-1392).  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Bosnian governor of Croatia 1388.  He controlled a district of Hum east of the Neretva River.  He occupied Konavli in 1392.[/li]
      [li]HRANJA – The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Vojvode of Bosnia.  m ANKA, daughter of — (-after 1410). 

    “Sandalj vojevoda” promised protection to “matrem suam Anka” by charter dated 1410.  Hranja & his wife had four children:


      [li]SANDALJ Hranić Kosača (-15 Mar 1435).  Vojvode of Bosnia.  He inherited his uncle's properties.  He acquired the land from Nevesinje to the coast when he captured Radič Sanković.  The Ragusians accepted

    “comitem Vukac et fratrem eius Sandalj et eorum masculam progeniem” among the Ragusian nobles and granted them “domum in urbe et terram in Primorje” by charter dated 3 Jul 1405.  He refused to recognise the accession of Stefan Ostojić as King of Bosnia in 1418, and with Turkish help ousted him from power, restoring Tvrtko II in his place.  Grand Vojvode of Bosnia, Knez of Zahumlje.  “Sandalj Hrasić, vojevoda bosnensis, et fratres Vlkac et Vlk” granted the Ragusans “suam partem župæ Konavlje” by charter dated 24 Jun 1419.  The Ragusians accepted “Bosnæ vojevodem Sandalj et consanguineous eius, knez Vukac, knez Vuk et Stephanum, filium knez Vukac” among the Ragusian nobles and granted them “domum in urbe” by charter dated 29 Jun 1419.  m firstly —.  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.  m secondly (Jun 1396) JELENA, daughter of — (-after 17 Feb 1403).  The Ragusians accepted a deposit of “duorum millium aureorum” from “Helena uxore vojevodæ Sandalj” by charter dated 17 Feb 1403.  m thirdly (Mar 1405, divorced 1411) KATARINA Hrvatinić, daughter of VUK Vukčić Ban of Croatia and Dalmatia (-after 1421).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.  m fourthly (after 8 Dec 1411) as her second husband, JELENA Lazarević, widow of DJURADJ II Stracimirović Balšić Lord of Zeta, daughter of LAZAR Hrebljanović Knez of Serbia & his wife Milica — (1365/70-Mar 1443).  The primary source which confirms her parentage and two marriages has not yet been identified.  Her birth date range is estimated on the birth of her first son (by her first marriage) in 1387.  The Ragusians accepted a deposit of “duorum millium ducatorum aureorum” from “Helena, vojevodæ Sandalj uxore” by charter dated 16 Feb 1423.  The testament of “Helenæ viduæ vojevodæ Sandalj” is dated 25 Nov 1442. [/li]
    [li]VUKAĆ Hranić (-Jun 1432).  Knez.  Patrician of Ragusa 1405/1420.  The Ragusians accepted “comitem Vukac et fratrem eius Sandalj et eorum masculam progeniem” among the Ragusian nobles and granted them “domum in urbe et terram in Primorje” by charter dated 3 Jul 1405.  Patrician of Venice 1423. [/li]
    [li]VUK Hranic (-Feb 1425).  Knez.  Patrician of Ragusa 1405/1420.  “Sandalj Hrasić, vojevoda bosnensis, et fratres Vlkac et Vlk” granted the Ragusans “suam partem župæ Konavlje” by charter dated 24 Jun 1419.  The Ragusians accepted “Bosnæ vojevodem Sandalj et consanguineous eius, knez Vukac, knez Vuk et Stephanum, filium knez Vukac” among the Ragusian nobles and granted them “domum in urbe” by charter dated 29 Jun 1419.  Patrician of Venice 1423. [/li]
    [li]YELCHO . m firstly LEONARDO Baša di Cattaro .  m secondly —.[/li]
    [/li]

    VUKAĆ Hranić, son of HRANJA Vojvode of Bosnia & his wife Anka — (-Jun 1432).  Knez.  Patrician of Ragusa 1405/1420.  The Ragusians accepted “comitem Vukac et fratrem eius Sandalj et eorum masculam progeniem” among the Ragusian nobles and granted them “domum in urbe et terram in Primorje” by charter dated 3 Jul 1405.  “Sandalj Hrasić, vojevoda bosnensis, et fratres Vlkac et Vlk” granted the Ragusans “suam partem župæ Konavlje” by charter dated 24 Jun 1419.  The Ragusians accepted “Bosnæ vojevodem Sandalj et consanguineous eius, knez Vukac, knez Vuk et Stephanum, filium knez Vukac” among the Ragusian nobles and granted them “domum in urbe” by charter dated 29 Jun 1419.  Patrician of Venice 1423.
    m KATHARINA, daughter of — (-after 1452).  The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified. 
    Vukać & his wife had two children:


      [li]STEFAN Vukčić Kosača (-22/23 May 1466).  The Ragusians accepted

    “Bosnæ vojevodem Sandalj et consanguineous eius, knez Vukac, knez Vuk et Stephanum, filium knez Vukac” among the Ragusian nobles and granted them “domum in urbe” by charter dated 29 Jun 1419.  Vojvode of Bosnia.  He succeeded his uncle in his territories along the River Neretva and from Onogošt (Nikšić) to the coast.  “Stephanus, Bosnæ magnus Vojeveda, filius fratris vojevodæ Sandalj” accepted his part of money deposited by “mango vojevoda Sandalj” by charter dated 18 Sep 1438.  “Stephanus, Bosnæ magnus vojevoda, et filii Vladisav et Vlatko” acknowledged receipt of money from the Ragusans by charter dated 7 May 1440.  He invaded upper Zeta as far as the Morača River in 1441, and Stefan Crnojević was obliged to hand over his son as hostage.  He refused to accept the election of Stjepan Tomaš as King of Bosnia in 1443, triggering the civil war which persisted until 1446, when peace was sealed by his daughter's marriage to the Bosnian king.  Under pressure from Venice along the coast, and faced with the restoration in 1444 of Djuradj Vuković as Despot of Serbia (including Zeta) and his recognition by Sultan Murad, Stefan Vukčić renounced his ambitions in Zeta, surrendering upper Zeta to Djuradj.  He dropped his title "Vojvode of Bosnia" in 1448, assuming the title "Herceg (Duke) of Hum and the Coast", changing it again in 1449 to "Herceg of Saint Sava" in recollection of the Serbian saint, son of Stefan Nemanja Grand Župan of Serbia who became a monk adopting the name Sava and was first archbishop of the independent church in Serbia. [/li]
    [li]TEODORA (-Apr 1450).  The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified.  Her marriage was arranged by her uncle Sandalj Hranić Kosača to confirm his recognition of Tvrtko II as restored King of Bosnia. “Radosav vojevoda, uxor eius Theodora et filius Ivaniš” acknowledged receipt of money from the Ragusans by charter dated 19 Aug 1439.  m (1421/22) RADOSLAV Pavlović Grand Vojvoda of Bosnia, Zupan of Konarlje, son of PAVEL Radenović & his wife —.[/li]

    [hr]

    #409536

    Anonymous
    [size=12pt]Voivodes of Bosnia (Radenović)[/size]

    PAVEL Radenović .  m —.  Pavel & his wife had one child:


      [li]RADOSLAV Pavlović (-1441/42). 

    “Radosav Pavlović, filius knez Pauli Radenović” confirmed donations made by “vojevoda Sandalj” by charter dated 3 Nov 1420.  Grand Vojvode of Bosnia, Zupan of Konarlje.  The Ragusans confirmed friendship with “Bosnæ vojevoda Radosav Pavlović” by charter dated 3 Nov 1420.  “Radoslav Pavlović, Bosnæ magnus vojevoda et filius (eius) knez Ivaniš” agreed friendship with the Ragusans by charter dated 31 Dec 1427. “Radoslav Pavlović, Bosnæ magnus vojevoda” acknowledged receipt of money from the Ragusans by charter dated Feb 1439.  m (1421/22) TEODORA, daughter of VUKA Ranić & his wife — (-Apr 1450).  “Radosav vojevoda, uxor eius Theodora et filius Ivaniš” acknowledged receipt of money from the Ragusans by charter dated 19 Aug 1439.  This marriage was arranged by her uncle Sandalj Hranić Kosača to confirm his recognition of Tvrtko II as restored King of Bosnia.  Radoslav & his wife had three children:


      [li]IVANIŠ

    “Radoslav Pavlović, Bosnæ magnus vojevoda et filius [eius] knez Ivaniš” agreed friendship with the Ragusans by charter dated 31 Dec 1427.  Vojvode of Bosnia.  The Ragusans made grants to “filiis Radosavi Pavlović, vojevodæ Ivaniš et comitibus Petro et Nicolao” by charter dated 10 Dec 1442.  “Ivaniš, chlmensis vojevoda, et cognati” made a treaty with the Ragusans against “herceg Stephanum Vukčić” by charter dated 25 Mar 1452.  “Ivaniš, chlmensis vojevoda, et cognati eius” accepted “provisionem” from Ragusa by charter dated 25 Mar 1458. [/li]
    [li]PETAR – The Ragusans made grants to “filiis Radosavi Pavlović, vojevodæ Ivaniš et comitibus Petro et Nicolao” by charter dated 10 Dec 1442.  Vojvode of Bosnia.  “Vojevoda Petrus et knewz Nicolaus, filii vojevodæ Radosav” confirmed the privileges of Ragusa by charter dated 15 Jul 1454. [/li]
    [li]NIKOLA – The Ragusans made grants to “filiis Radosavi Pavlović, vojevodæ Ivaniš et comitibus Petro et Nicolao” by charter dated 10 Dec 1442. “Vojevoda Petrus et knewz Nicolaus, filii vojevodæ Radosav” confirmed the privileges of Ragusa by charter dated 15 Jul 1454.[/li]
    [/li]

    [hr]

    #409537

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Where did you hear this? So Kotroman could possible be a non-Slav?

    It's intermediate knowledge of Bosnian medieval history. This info is even posted in Wikipedia under Ban Boric. Kotroman is almost definately non-Slavic root as the name isn't really found anywhere in Slavdom outside medieval Bosnia. However, as concerns the Gothic Cotroman its still mostly speculation. It is known that Gotfried was employed by Stephen of Hungary to oppose Ban Boric but one of his soldiers Cotroman is almost like a legend. We don't know if an actual Cotroman existed or whether it was just legend of a great fighter during this period. But this is the earliest mention of Kotroman we can link to the region. Nothing is said whether Cotroman settled in Bosnia and became even a noble and started his own family line. Or , it could've been just a legendary name give to a Bosnian descendent of Boric which would make our Bosnian Kotroman extracted from Croatian-Slavonian nobility like Ban Boric was. Not much is known about Gotfried either but it is actually possible that he himself could be of the Croatian noble family of Keglavic ( just speculation mostly). Truth is no one really knows when the name 'Kotroman' enters the Bosnian scene but Cotroman the Goth is the best we have to go on. Again , its almost certainly not Slavic.

    #409538

    Anonymous
    [size=12pt]Hercegovina (formerly Zahumlje, Hum)[/size]

    Knez of Zahumlje (Vjiševići)
    [hr]
    VYŠ (Vyšeslav), son of —.  Knez of Zahumlje.
    m —.  The name of Vyš´s wife is not known.
    Vyš & his wife had one child:


      [li]MIHAIL Vjišević (-after 940).  The

    De Administrando Imperio of Konstantinos Porphyrogenetos names "proconsulis et patricii Michaelis Busebutze Zachlumorum principis filii" as ruler of "Zachluma", stating that the territory included the towns of "Stagnum, Mocriscis, Iosle, Galumaenic et Dobriscic".  Knez of Zahumlje.  The titles accorded to Mihail show that Zahumlje must have been under Byzantine suzerainty during his reign.  m —.  The name of Mihail´s wife is not known.  Mihail & his wife had two children:


      [li]DRAGISLAV – The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Knez of Zahumlje. [/li]
      [li]BOLESLAV – The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified. Zupan of Zahumlje. [/li]

    [/li]

    STEFAN Vojislav
    [hr]
    According to Europäische Stammtafeln, he was the son of either Dragislav Knez of Zahumlje or his brother Boleslav Zupan of Zahumlje.  Knez of Zahumlje and Trebinje 1036-after 1042, in Ston/Stagno.  Leader of the Serbian rebellion in Primorje 1036/1040.  m —.  The name of Stefan´s wife is not known.  Stefan & his wife had one child:


      [li]son .  The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.  Baptised 1037/41.  same person as …?  LJUTOVID (-killed in battle 1052/54).  Knez of Zahumlje and Trebinje.  He led troops from Bosnia and Raška, with Byzantine support, against Stefan Dobroslav Knez of Duklja in 1042 but suffered a major defeat, whereupon Duklja annexed most of Zahumlje.  The Chronicle of the Priest of Duklja records that Gojislav of Duklja defeated

    "Prince Lutovid" who fled.  Strategos of Zahumlje, hypatos and protospatarios, as the vassal of Byzantium.  He founded the Benedictine monastery on the island of Locrum 1054.[/li]

    DOMANEC
    [hr]
    According to Europäische Stammtafeln, he was the possible son of Ljutovid. Knez of Trebinje 1054/55.  He was killed by Radoslav of Duklja.

    DESA
    [hr]
    "Dessa Dioclie, Terbunie et Zacholmie dux" donated "insulam Melite" to the monastery of St Maria in Pulsano by charter dated 1150. "Dessa magnus comes terre Zachulmie" donated "ecclesiam s. Pancratii" to "monasterio Iacromensi" by charter dated to 1151, confirmed by "Banus Slauogast cum filiis et omnibus Zachulmie nobilibus" by charter dated 1 Dec [1154].
    [hr]

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