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  • #346543

    Anonymous

    [img width=700]http://www.sadanduseless.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/carpet20.jpg” />

    So whats the story behind Persian carpets hanged on walls in Russia?

    [img width=700]http://www.sadanduseless.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/carpet18.jpg” />

    [img width=697 height=700]http://www.sadanduseless.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/carpet15.jpg” />

    [img width=700]http://www.sadanduseless.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/carpet13.jpg” />

    [img width=700]http://www.sadanduseless.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/carpet3.jpg” />

    [img width=700]http://www.sadanduseless.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/carpet10.jpg” />

    #431878

    Anonymous

    In the past carpets in Europe were rare and very expensive, often a status symbol. It was considered a waste to have them on the ground and walk on them, so they rather hung them on the walls, like paintings, for others to admire them and show people how wealthy they are. I guess that tradition just stuck with the people in Russia, if that really is the case. Afterall, they have nice patterns, don't they?

    #431879

    Anonymous
    #431880

    Anonymous

    off topic but those are some of the funniest photos i've ever seen :D

    #431881

    Anonymous

    The reason I was told was that back in Soviet times when most many people lived in those cheap tower blocks the walls were so thin that they needed to drown out the sound somehow. So they put carpet on the walls to drown out the sound coming from other apartments. Now they're unnecessary but they look nice I guess.

    #431882

    Anonymous

    The carpets are certainly beautiful! Keeping all those rugs clean must be a chore. I guess one could vacuum the walls with attachments. lol I have one on the hardwood floor in my living room. That's enough. My allergies would strongly dislike carpeting on the walls, I think!

    #431883

    Anonymous

    We had one too! Untill a group of gypsies broke in and stole it.

    #431884

    Anonymous

    the pinnacle of eastern kitch, in my opinion.

    Quote:
    We had one too! Untill a group of gypsies broke in and stole it.

    good work, gypsies!  ;D

    #431885

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    We had one too! Untill a group of gypsies broke in and stole it.

    Gypsies in one of my ancestral villages. I hear they are capable of stealing anything! >.<
    [img width=700 height=393]http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/836/ph36.jpg” />

    #431886

    Anonymous

    A tradition from another century .. Any way to get rid off them is a good way :D

    #431887

    Anonymous

    Wall carpets became fashionable during Soviet era.

    Many lower cost Soviet apartments were built from concrete panels, which don't provide adequate insulation in colder months of the year.  Also, carpets were put on interior walls for sound insulation, as one could hear neighbours in the adjacent apartment.

    Also, some people considered wall carpets fashionable. During Soviet times the choice of interior design products was limited. A typical launch room had furniture known as 'stenka' in colloquial language manufactured on a typical Soviet factory 'The Red Turpentine'. Inside the 'stenka' there were books from classical Russian literature and crystal glasses. On the opposite side of the 'stenka' would be a sofa. In the corner near entrance to the balcony you will find a large Soviet-made lamp TV-set that needed to be taken to TV workshop for a repair every second month.

    Some people were inventive finding temporary labourers (shabashniki) with an artistic touch to decorate their apartments. My uncle studied decorative arts in architecture in St Petersburg having work experience during his studies in famous Hermitage. He said he could stopped working for the government doing temporary work for people, who paid much better than the government. But Soviet laws required people to be employed for the government, so he continued working for the government doing temporary work in evenings and weekends for people. This  was also illegal in Soviet times but authorities were turning a blind eye on such activities.

    Carpet dusting is done outside in the front yard. A typical arrangement in a suburban area is 4 x 9-12 storey buildings with an empty square in the middle, on which children were playing in playgrounds,  teens gathering, grandmothers watching after small grandchildren gossiping about neighbours and teens.

    #431888

    Anonymous

    Its so popular that Belarus took carpet as their flag :)

    #431889

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Its so popular that Belarus took carpet as their flag :)

    The ornament was made by an elderly woman living in Viciebsk region, northern Belarus in 1917. The  main element in the middle of the ornament represents the rising sun. The cross and four dots inside of the central rhombus represent a sown field. These symbols are found in other Slavic cultures. Historians and ethnographers are saying the elements on the ornament are ancient. They are as Slavic as they can be.

    image

    #431890

    Anonymous

    image

    #431891

    Anonymous

    Also we had them in Croatia during Yugoslavia era also, most older people still have them in their homes. However they were never placed on the walls :D but those Arab/Persian/Middle east carpets were always seen as beautiful hand-craft and home decor.

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