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  • #345735

    Anonymous

    I ought to do this thread long ago since i see this chapel every year and its generaly an important monument. The chapel is symbol of Russo-Slovene friendship and relationships. It was build by Russian prisoners of WWI during their construction of Vršič pass road. They builded the chapel becouse some of their mates died in a tragic avalanche. A great and painful feat with no doubt since the pass is quite intense and even with car you can feel its a hard road.

    Well before i feed you with some regular wikipedia info, which is legit and has no errors as far as i noticed, i would like to say that the chapel used to be better before 2005 renovation (ok the color is better now). That is becouse there is no more wishing bell which i used to ring every year. That was my favorite part of the chapel. ;D Yeah i know am still a bit of a kiddo i like wishing bells very much. :D

    image

    Chapel during WWI.

    The Russian Chapel at the Vršič Pass (Slovene: Ruska kapela na Vršiču) is a Russian Orthodox memorial chapel located on the Vršič Pass road in northwestern Slovenia. It was built by Russian prisoners of war engaged in forced labor in the area during World War I.
    History

    In early 1915, the small town of Kranjska Gora suddenly became strategically important due to its proximity to the Isonzo Front. To facilitate access from the town to the front, the Austro-Hungarian authorities ordered the construction of a military road across Vršič, a 1,611 m pass between the Sava and Soča valleys, to be built by Russian POWs.

    The road was begun in May 1915, and was completed by the end of the year. To ensure an uninterrupted supply of materiel to the front lines, the pass was to be kept traversable year-round, and the POWs were made to clear the road of heavy snowfall. On 8 or 12 March 1916 (sources vary), an avalanche buried a POW work camp, killing approximately 300 prisoners and about 10 guards. Exact casualty figures were never determined, either for the victims of the avalanche of for those of the brutal overwork and appalling conditions.

    The Russian camp was located roughly halfway up the slope of Vršic. Between 1916 and 1917, the remaining prisoners built a small wooden memorial chapel. The building is of typical Russian design, with two small towers on either side of the nave, and is surrounded by prisoners' graves and a pyramid-shaped memorial marker to the immediate right of the chapel.

    The site was renovated in 2005, at a cost of €90,000, and serves as both a war memorial and a symbolic link between Slovenia and Russia. The pass road was renamed Ruska cesta (Russian Road) in July 2006.

    [img width=464 height=700]http://kraji.eu/PICTURES/gorenjska/kranjska_gora_z_okolico/vrsic/ruska_kapelica/DSC_5075_ruska_kapelica_stopnice_big.jpg” />

    Enterance to the Russian chapel's grove from the road.

    [img width=700 height=464]http://kraji.eu/PICTURES/gorenjska/kranjska_gora_z_okolico/vrsic/ruska_kapelica/DSC_5065_ruska_kapelica_big.jpg” />

    [img width=700 height=469]http://gregorkrasnja1.files.wordpress.com/2010/11/ruska-kapelica-3-copy.jpg” />

    [img width=700 height=525]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/7e/2011_commemoration_at_Vr%C5%A1i%C4%8D_Russian_Chapel_%283%29.jpg” />

    [img width=700 height=467]http://res001.gps-tour.info/redx/tools/mb_image.php/file.y6999380a99dfb3634ca1d8ca3ed6b7a1c8bbf6c320c07bbcda00a5603739b4f3/gid.8/KrGor145.JPG” />

    Various Russian and Slovene officials meet here every year and there is always big fuzz over it. Anyways theres usually lots of them but i believe we see them more than enough everyday anyways;

    [img width=700 height=536]http://www.delo.si/assets/media/picture/20090726/Ruska_kapelica1.jpg?rev=1″ />

    [img width=700 height=477]http://www.delo.si/assets/media/picture/20120731/djvu_1324634_cakaricn_-iza–Ruska-kapelica-Vr–i–.jpeg?rev=8″ />

    [img width=700 height=462]http://www.delo.si/assets/media/picture/20120729/Delo_Foto-20120729134913-10117000.jpeg?rev=3″ />

    image

    #420942

    Anonymous

    Such a poignant story.  :'(  I love Russian Orthodox church architecture and art, especially as half my family was Russian Orthodox.  Amazing that these prisoners were able to construct this in the most daunting of circumstances. What a magnificent tribute to their fallen comrades. So sad to hear the bell has perished.

    #420943

    Anonymous

    Great topic, I was there once, years ago, before it got renovated. It was pretty fine then too. But honestly, I don't remember any wishing bell … I remember the pyramid though, was that replaced by a new one too?

    image
    It was like this when I was there …

    Yeah, all those Slovene and Russian politicians there every year, quite something. ;D :P Wasn't even Putin there once?

    #420944

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Great topic, I was there once, years ago, before it got renovated. It was pretty fine then too. But honestly, I don't remember any wishing bell … I remember the pyramid though, was that replaced by a new one too?

    Uff you got me here with the pyramid. I dunno wether it already existed or not tbh. Well wishing bell was on upper left side of the doors. :D

    Quote:
    Yeah, all those Slovene and Russian politicians there every year, quite something. ;D :P Wasn't even Putin there once?

    Well they sure made one deal. The pipeline and we both had/have the benefit to see it under construction. ;D

    Quote:
    Amazing that these prisoners were able to construct this in the most daunting of circumstances. What a magnificent tribute to their fallen comrades.

    Yes indeed. :)

    #420945

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Uff you got me here with the pyramid. I dunno wether it already existed or not tbh. Well wishing bell was on upper left side of the doors. :D

    Well, the pyramid was already there before, I know that, but I thought theyy might made a new one since they were renewing the place … Anyhow, I still don't remember that bell! :D Which is weird, because I always rang such bells when I was small.

    Could that wishing bell be a Slovene "input"? Afterall, they are in numerous places throughout Slovenia and quite deep in our folk belief.

    #420946

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Well, the pyramid was already there before, I know that, but I thought theyy might made a new one since they were renewing the place … Anyhow, I still don't remember that bell! :D Which is weird, because I always rang such bells when I was small.

    Could that wishing bell be a Slovene "input"? Afterall, they are in numerous places throughout Slovenia and quite deep in our folk belief.

    Ok since the bell is missing since 2005 when i was still quite small i forgot much. I asked father. The bell was on inside but the bell handle to ring with it was on the outside. If you look at your picture of pre-2005 black colored chapel more closely on the left side of the door you can see a handle. Poorly wisable but it is there. It also had thin string on its end to pull.

    Actually my description was not great it would be better to say the handle is on the right side of the left bell tower. Do you see it? In any case yeah wishing bells are typical for our chapels especially those on hills and mountains and even if there aren't chapels there are often crosses & icons with wishing bells both attached to the trees. One good example is on Kamniški vrh. :D So i dunno wether this bell was later introduction or was it originally there. We need our Russian members to have a say on this?

    #420947

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Ok since the bell is missing since 2005 when i was still quite small i forgot much. I asked father. The bell was on inside but the bell handle to ring with it was on the outside. If you look at your picture of pre-2005 black colored chapel more closely on the left side of the door you can see a handle. Poorly wisable but it is there. It also had thin string on its end to pull.

    Actually my description was not great it would be better to say the handle is on the right side of the left bell tower. Do you see it? In any case yeah wishing bells are typical for our chapels especially those on hills and mountains and even if there aren't chapels there are often crosses & icons with wishing bells both attached to the trees. One good example is on Kamniški vrh. :D So i dunno wether this bell was later introduction or was it originally there. We need our Russian members to have a say on this?

    Naa, I can't see it really … better said, I'm not sure. ;D I don't know for that many bells, one is on top of the hill Grmada, near Celje. There's also a big cross next to the bell on top of the hill. And we are pretty crazy about churches. Hack, alone my village has three of them, plus numerous chapels and crosses. But it gets really absurd if you go to Savinjska. There almost every dozen of houses (a "village") has his own church or two.

    #420948

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    And we are pretty crazy about churches. Hack, alone my village has three of them, plus numerous chapels and crosses. But it gets really absurd if you go to Savinjska. There almost every dozen of houses (a "village") has his own church or two.

    I was told we can thank good ol' Joseph for that. :D He abolished lots of monestaries, etc. but made an order to build lots of churches in order to decrease time for ppl to go from church. However tbh i doubt this claim. But yeah lots of churches for sure. I can quite understand why. We don't want to travel long distances. Heck for me even going to Kranj is almost an adventure. Altho its actually near. ;D

    Quote:
    I don't know for that many bells, one is on top of the hill Grmada, near Celje. There's also a big cross next to the bell on top of the hill.

    I know quite some of them. :D But ofc. they are not everywhere and i have a feeling there are less of them now. :(

    #420949

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I was told we can thank good ol' Joseph for that. :D He abolished lots of monestaries, etc. but made an order to build lots of churches in order to decrease time for ppl to go from church. However tbh i doubt this claim. But yeah lots of churches for sure. I can quite understand why. We don't want to travel long distances. Heck for me even going to Kranj is almost an adventure. Altho its actually near. ;D

    I know about the monestaries, but I know how true that with the churces might be … Where I lived before, the church was only some 600 m away. Otherwise the nearest church was downtown and there were 2, plus the monestary on the other side of Savinja, another one above the monestary, on the hill and one Jožefov hrib. And there is another one in Hudinja part of the city, for a few years now … So 7 churches (5 full time operating, 1 part time, 1 only ocasionally) in town. :D

    Oh, and I forgot the Ortodox church downtown …

    #420950

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I know about the monestaries, but I know how true that with the churces might be … Where I lived before, the church was only some 600 m away. Otherwise the nearest church was downtown and there were 2, plus the monestary on the other side of Savinja, another one above the monestary, on the hill and one Jožefov hrib. And there is another one in Hudinja part of the city, for a few years now … So 7 churches (5 full time operating, 1 part time, 1 only ocasionally) in town. :D

    Oh, and I forgot the Ortodox church downtown …

    Hahaha you maniacs. ;D Well this i could found out bout Joseph and his church reforms;

    He financed the large increase in bishoprics, parishes, and secular clergy by extensive sales of monastic lands.

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