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  • #343988

    Anonymous

    Hi,

    Can someone please explain why the name of recent Olympic 400m hurdle champion, Natalya Antyuch, isn't consistent with Slavic naming conventions? Shouldn't it be Antyukha?
    She's a Russian who was born in Saint Petersburg and lives in Russia, so she probably hasn't adjusted her name to comply with foreign naming customs.

    I apologise if this isn't the right forum.

    #395065

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Hi,

    Can someone please explain why the name of recent Olympic 400m hurdle champion, Natalya Antyuch, isn't consistent with Slavic naming conventions? Shouldn't it be Antyukha?
    She's a Russian who was born in Saint Petersburg and lives in Russia, so she probably hasn't adjusted her name to comply with foreign naming customs.

    I apologise if this isn't the right forum.

    She has Belarusian surname.  The spelling of this surname is consistent with Russian conventions. The letter 'a' at the end of the surname is not needed.

    #395066

    Anonymous

    Thanks for replying so quickly.

    So Belarusian names can vary substantially in their endings (with "a"- Azarenka, Herasimenia- or without) and they don't follow the same conventions as Russian. Is there any variation between Belarusian and Ukrainian suffixes? One of the main causes of my confusion over Antyukh's name was difference between her and the Ukrainian triple jumper Olha Saladukha. I assumed that since the suffixes were similar they should both end in an "a".

    Thanks again for your help.

    #395067

    Anonymous

    No, only surnames derived from adjectives have female formes. Гончаров Гончарова; Куделин, Куделина. Антюх is not adjective either in Belorussian or Russian.
    Azarenka is of Ukrainian origin, it just renders Belorussian spelling of her name. Саладуха is not female form, both males and females from that family bear same surname.

    #395068

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Thanks for replying so quickly.

    So Belarusian names can vary substantially in their endings (with "a"- Azarenka, Herasimenia- or without) and they don't follow the same conventions as Russian. Is there any variation between Belarusian and Ukrainian suffixes? One of the main causes of my confusion over Antyukh's name was difference between her and the Ukrainian triple jumper Olha Saladukha. I assumed that since the suffixes were similar they should both end in an "a".

    Thanks again for your help.

    The Belarusian surnames do vary. It's difficult to say about the amount variations between Ukrainian and Belarusian surnames. The surname could belong to either nationality. Some are commonly found in one country, while others in another. You just accept that Antyuch is the correct form for a female surname or you will be confused . If she was going to russify her surname it'd probably look like Antyuch(ina)

    #395069

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    No, only surnames derived from adjectives have female formes. Гончаров Гончарова; Куделин, Куделина. Антюх is not adjective either in Belorussian or Russian.
    Azarenka is of Ukrainian origin, it just renders Belorussian spelling of her name. Саладуха is not female form, both males and females from that family bear same surname.

    That’s very interesting. Thanks for the information. Can you give some examples of Russian female surnames that don’t end in “a”? I can’t seem to think of any that are of Russian origin.

    So “Azarenka” and “Azarenko” is the same surname rendered in Belarusian and Ukrainian respectively. If I understand correctly, the “ka” suffix in Azarenka and the “ka” ending in Radwanska or Ragowska don’t indicate any similarity. Radwanska and Ragowska would be Polish (?) female equivalents of “ski”, whereas Azarenka would be the Belarusian rendering of the Ukrainian “ko”.

    Do “Antyukh” and “Saladukha” have any meaning? What about Hleb? Is it of also of Belarusian origin, and am I right in thinking that the female equivalent would be identical?

    Thanks again for your help.

    #395070

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    The Belarusian surnames do vary. It's difficult to say about the amount variations between Ukrainian and Belarusian surnames. The surname could belong to either nationality. Some are commonly found in one country, while others in another. You just accept that Antyuch is the correct form for a female surname or you will be confused . If she was going to russify her surname it'd probably look like Antyuch(ina)

    Which suffixes would be specifically Ukrainian or Belarusian?

    Thanks to the helpful replies here I’m considerably less confused now.
    How did you know Antyukh was of Belarusian origin?

    #395071

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    So “Azarenka” and “Azarenko” is the same surname rendered in Belarusian and Ukrainian respectively. If I understand correctly, the “ka” suffix in Azarenka and the “ka” ending in Radwanska or Ragowska don’t indicate any similarity. Radwanska and Ragowska would be Polish (?) female equivalents of “ski”, whereas Azarenka would be the Belarusian rendering of the Ukrainian “ko”.

    Yes. Belorussian same as Russian have akanye (reduction of unstressed o). So it is pronouned Azarenka in that two languages. I am not sure about Ukrianian pronounciation. Only difference is in orthography. Russians would write: Азаренко, Belorussians Азаренка, given the fact that Belorsussian orthography is phonological, like Serbian fro example, (basic principle: Write as you speak).

    Hleb is common Slavic word. It means bread. I dont know what is etimology of Antyuh and Soloduha, but I will check.

    #395072

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Yes. Belorussian same as Russian have akanye (reduction of unstressed o). So it is pronouned Azarenka in that two languages. I am not sure about Ukrianian pronounciation. Only difference is in orthography. Russians would write: Азаренко, Belorussians Азаренка, given the fact that Belorsussian orthography is phonological, like Serbian fro example, (basic principle: Write as you speak).

    Hleb is common Slavic word. It means bread. I dont know what is etimology of Antyuh and Soloduha, but I will check.

    Thanks for the info on akanye.  It certainly helps explain much of the variation in spelling and pronounciation that I often see. Accordingly, shouldn’t the Ukrainian footballer Konoplyanka be Konoplyanko? Does his name indicate some Belarusian connection?

    #395073

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Which suffixes would be specifically Ukrainian or Belarusian?

    Thanks to the helpful replies here I’m considerably less confused now.
    How did you know Antyukh was of Belarusian origin?

    The same suffixes are found in either country. Some are common in Ukraine such -ko or -uk, others such -ich are more common in Belarus. But the both countries share the same set of suffixes. I was not sure whether Antyuch was Belarusian or Ukrainian, so I checked the origins of the surname and it has Belarusian origins. Ukraine has also similarly formed surnames: Artyuch or Matyuch.
    The surnames are rather rare derived from the names Anton, Artem and Matviy respectively. Suffix -yuch is used in Slavic languages making the name sound diminutive and very informal.
    In Russian for example, Valuycha (girls name), Andryucha (Andrei), Petrucha (Petr), but with Anton it’s Antocha.

    #395074

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Thanks for the info on akanye.  It certainly helps explain much of the variation in spelling and pronounciation that I often see. Accordingly, shouldn’t the Ukrainian footballer Konoplyanka be Konoplyanko? Does his name indicate some Belarusian connection?

    No. Коноплянка is Russian (and Ukrainian) for Linnet. I dont know how Belorussians call that bird (possibily same as other two peoples, all three languages are similar), he could be of Belorussian ancestry, but surname is just name for bird, and does not inidcate much.

    This is  коноплянка:
    [img height=300]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5d/Makol%C4%85gwa.jpg” />

    #395075

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Accordingly, shouldn’t the Ukrainian footballer Konoplyanka be Konoplyanko? Does his name indicate some Belarusian connection?

    Not necessarily.

    #395076

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    The same suffixes are found in either country. Some are common in Ukraine such -ko or -uk, others such -ich are more common in Belarus. But the both countries share the same set of suffixes. I was not sure whether Antyuch was Belarusian or Ukrainian, so I checked the origins of the surname and it has Belarusian origins. Ukraine has also similarly formed surnames: Artyuch or Matyuch.
    The surnames are rather rare derived from the names Anton, Artem and Matviy respectively. Suffix -yuch is used in Slavic languages making the name sound diminutive and very informal.
    In Russian for example, Valuycha (girls name), Andryucha (Andrei), Petrucha (Petr), but with Anton it’s Antocha.

    Thanks.
    Is there an online resource to check the origins of Slavic surnames?

    #395077

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    No. Коноплянка is Russian (and Ukrainian) for Linnet. I dont know how Belorussians call that bird (possibily same as other two peoples, all three languages are similar), he could be of Belorussian ancestry, but surname is just name for bird, and does not inidcate much.

    This is  коноплянка:
    [img height=300]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5d/Makol%C4%85gwa.jpg” />

    So Konoplyanka is a word that just happens to end with "ka". I guess it helps to know the language.
    Thanks for all your help.

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