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  • #358412

    Anonymous

    @Slavo, Thanks so much for sharing these images!!!  I'd love to hear more of your experiences there in SubCarpathia on the Rusyn identity issue.

    #358413

    Anonymous

    something wrong with that playground  ;D
    lovely country anyway

    #358414

    Anonymous

    Thanks too slavicmuse!
    Well, what do you want to hear specifically? Or just in general? I am open to write something about it (If I will have enough time, I will scan touristic guide in Slovako-Rusyn language about their "Morské oko"
    Hah, Mišo, it was something like advertisement for 2012 football championship.

    #358415

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Hey, I am kinda new to the forum.
    I have family in Zakarpattja (Subc. Rus) and I must say, situation with their national identity isn't bright.
    Old people, who lived there at days of 1st Czechoslovak republic (well, many of them are dead now) identify themeselves as Rusyns, but next generations…They consider themeselves as Ukraians, even thought they speak Rusyn, their mothers were telling Rusyn tales (…)
    And here are some pictures from Zakarpattja I made.
    [img width=700 height=525]http://i.imgur.com/LTR4JrH.jpg” />
    [img width=700 height=525]http://i.imgur.com/1aCv6Qx.jpg” />
    [img width=700 height=525]http://i.imgur.com/b3Kath3.jpg” />
    [img width=700 height=524]http://i.imgur.com/Pc00uGk.jpg” />
    [img width=700 height=525]http://i.imgur.com/wJpozVu.jpg” />
    [img width=700 height=525]http://i.imgur.com/qvMOKsK.jpg” />
    [img width=700 height=525]http://i.imgur.com/WbPrvXP.jpg” />
    [img width=700 height=525]http://i.imgur.com/WCgUeJc.jpg” />
    [img width=700 height=525]http://i.imgur.com/5ulDeor.jpg” />
    [img width=700 height=525]http://i.imgur.com/3PqM5vk.jpg” />
    [img width=700 height=525]http://i.imgur.com/jfCV91P.jpg” />
    [img width=700 height=525]http://i.imgur.com/fxiUswQ.jpg” />
    [img width=700 height=525]http://i.imgur.com/8Ef3LFG.jpg” />
    [img width=700 height=525]http://i.imgur.com/zfuEpuH.jpg” />
    [img width=700 height=525]http://i.imgur.com/kbfaB7S.jpg” />
    [img width=700 height=525]http://i.imgur.com/weMAcpD.jpg” />
    [img width=700 height=525]http://i.imgur.com/B6kimNC.jpg” />
    [img width=700 height=524]http://i.imgur.com/k2V6O6y.jpg” />
    [img width=525 height=700]http://i.imgur.com/jUTY2d7.jpg” />
    [img width=700 height=525]http://i.imgur.com/jQGYWsk.jpg” />
    [img width=700 height=525]http://i.imgur.com/oXPFuU8.jpg” />
    [img width=700 height=525]http://i.imgur.com/sqhjKMD.jpg” />
    [img width=700 height=525]http://i.imgur.com/l8FFstI.jpg” />

    Beautiful photos, I hope to visit by next summer.  do you think that  the youth shifting to a Ukrainian identity is due to the communist era forcing this or is because of travel or cultural influence of Ukraine?

    #358416

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Beautiful photos, I hope to visit by next summer.  do you think that  the youth shifting to a Ukrainian identity is due to the communist era forcing this or is because of travel or cultural influence of Ukraine?

    Thanks.
    Honestly? I think it's because of both, but Rusyns weren't minority in ČSSR either. But as you can see, Slovakia has highest population of Rusyns (according to wiki), they are free to be as Rusyn as they want, but in Ukraine…I won't say they are oppressed, but the whole thing about being Rusyn is basically erased (if you don't count language, their traditions etc.) it's just something like part of Ukraian tradition.
    That's another thing, their "Rusyness" isn't 100% dead. They consider themeselves as Ukraians, they are fans of Ukraian football representation (…) but they resist to speak Ukraian and I never heard it in there. If yes, probably only by milicioners (when they work)

    #358417

    Anonymous

    Hmmm I thought Rusyn was a dialect of Ukrainian and would be mutual understandable?  My family lost the language after a generation here and I still don't know what they spoke.  My cousins use the eastern Slovak dialect with a large German influence.  Never asked if they still speak Rusyn or not. 

    #358418

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Hmmm I thought Rusyn was a dialect of Ukrainian and would be mutual understandable?  My family lost the language after a generation here and I still don't know what they spoke.  My cousins use the eastern Slovak dialect with a large German influence.  Never asked if they still speak Rusyn or not.

    I imagine it would be more telligible (if not very similiar) with the Ukrainian dialects spoken in America and Canada, which are based on 1890s Galizien Dialects which retrospectively are a purer form of Ukrainian without the Russian / Soviet influence.

    I assume that's the case because there are mixed communities of Rusyn and Ukrainians in America and Canada and I've never heard of an inability to converse between the two.

    #358419

    Anonymous

    Would think it's very similar.  I don't argue about the Rusyn/Ukrainian difference,  the people,  language and culture is closely connected. 

    #358420

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Thanks too slavicmuse!
    Well, what do you want to hear specifically? Or just in general? I am open to write something about it (If I will have enough time, I will scan touristic guide in Slovako-Rusyn language about their "Morské oko"
    Hah, Mišo, it was something like advertisement for 2012 football championship.

    Oi.. I want to know everything! Hahahaa! But I'll take general for now and maybe ask questions based on that. :)

    #358421

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Would think it's very similar.  I don't argue about the Rusyn/Ukrainian difference,  the people,  language and culture is closely connected. 

    Sounds similiar to this
    Закарпаться мова ))….360.mp4

    @Slavicmuse
    Well, as I said before they consider themeselves as Ukraians. They don't even think that they are not, but most of the time, they rather call themeselves "Zakarpatci", but still as part of Ukraian nation.
    People still speak Rusyn.
    Funny thing is that they don't know (or don't like?) Ukraian anthem.
    Overall, they are poor, but nice and kind people.
    Their dialect of Rusyn is really similiar to Slovak language, I understand it very well.
    Most of people are orthodox or greco-catholic, only small part of them is roman-catholic (And these salute themeselves "Slava Isosu Christu")
    But they saved a lot of their traditions (For example, when someone dies, body has to stay in house for 3 days and at night there must be someone with it, 3+people)
    And one more thing. I go there for like 10 years, but I've never seen Rusyn flag.

    #358422

    Anonymous

    So would you judge Rusyn lingo as one of its own (independent)? Anyways; ;D

    [img width=473 height=700]http://blog.activeukraine.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/Easter-rooster.jpg” />

    #358423

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Sounds similiar to this
    Закарпаться мова ))….360.mp4

    @Slavicmuse
    Well, as I said before they consider themeselves as Ukraians. They don't even think that they are not, but most of the time, they rather call themeselves "Zakarpatci", but still as part of Ukraian nation.
    People still speak Rusyn.
    Funny thing is that they don't know (or don't like?) Ukraian anthem.
    Overall, they are poor, but nice and kind people.
    Their dialect of Rusyn is really similiar to Slovak language, I understand it very well.
    Most of people are orthodox or greco-catholic, only small part of them is roman-catholic (And these salute themeselves "Slava Isosu Christu")
    But they saved a lot of their traditions (For example, when someone dies, body has to stay in house for 3 days and at night there must be someone with it, 3+people)
    And one more thing. I go there for like 10 years, but I've never seen Rusyn flag.

    Sounds like the identity crisis is more of an issue to those Rusyns living OUTSIDE of Ukraine…??? Hrm.

    My great grandparents considered themselves as Rusyn but didn't pass anything on.. no language or culture.  But many Rusyns in the USA I talk to make it sound like the Rusyns in Ukraine are outraged by the fact they are not recognized…

    #358424

    Anonymous

    well their intellectual elite is surely disappointed.
    speech in video sounded really different and a lot like ukrainian to me, i understood about 50%. language of rusyns "here" is almost 100% understandable for me  :)

    #358425

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    well their intellectual elite is surely disappointed.
    speech in video sounded really different and a lot like ukrainian to me, i understood about 50%. language of rusyns "here" is almost 100% understandable for me  :)

    What you mean by intellectual elite disapointed? Anyways so your dialect is really similar to Rusyn? Or Slovak Rusyn takes over Slovak elements and Ukrainian Rusyns takes over Ukrainian elements?

    #358426

    Anonymous

    @slavicmuse
    I don't think Rusyns out of Ukraine have some identity issues or crysis, since for example here, they are recognized as minority(+They can from year 1995 use their language officially, and there are schools for them) and same in many countries, like Romania.
    Rusyns are in many things similiar to us, they assimilate really quickly.

    @Barov
    I think they have same thing as we had 200-300 years ago- they are not united, they speak different dialects and don't use official form. +They live in different countries, obviously.
    For example their speak in comparison to Ukraian has "G" (At least in Subc. Rus)

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