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  • #380487

    Anonymous

    It may be interesting to see how the Slavic masks look like, what they represents and in which kind of rituals are they used.

    I found those photos and few informations about Bulgaria from this point of view here: http://www.eliznik.org.uk/Bulgaria/costume/index.htm

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    Kukeri

    Mid winter and spring ritual to scare away the evil spirits with animal masks, bells and wild dancing

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    Koledari and Sourvakari

    Going house to house wishing well and singing songs

    Mid winter and spring ritual to scare away the evil spirits with animal masks, bells and wild dancing

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    #380424

    Anonymous

    Nice Al locului. These maska that Bulgarians use are similar to Zvončari that one could see in Croatia, Slovenia and Serbia, however i think these Bulgarian masks have pre-slavic origin. Not sure is it Dacian, Thracian or something else

    #380425

    Anonymous

    Cool thread Al locului. Some masks in Slovene folklore;

    The famous Kurent or Korant from Dravsko polje, Ptujsko polje & Haloze in Štajerska region (anyway later i will add some other masks too).

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    [img width=700 height=418]http://zlataleta.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/kurent.jpg” />

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    #380426

    Anonymous

    Drežniški pustovi from Goriška. Other parts of Goriška also had similar costumes but they lost this tradition;

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    #380427

    Anonymous

    I heard that's an Illyrian tradition adopted by the South Slavs, anyone know if this is correct?

    #380428

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I heard that's an Illyrian tradition adopted by the South Slavs, anyone know if this is correct?

    The fact with the Wallachian civilisation (Vlasi), the Celts, Gauls, Liburnians, Illyrians, Thracians, Dacians etc. the Romanised nations of the Roman empire in general, is that their culture was assimilated into the Roman one, far earlier than the Slavs came to old Europe. We can only assume which tradition they had prior to that, if not stated in the historical documents. Their descendents the Wallachians (meaning Roman People in Slavic and Germanic languages – colloquially known as Vlachs/Vlasi) were largely assimilated into the Slavic/Germanic nations, eventhough some stayed preserved till today, Irish, Scots, Romanians, Aromanian/south-eastern Vlachs etc. The European regions and states evolved out of that old Europe are: Wallachia (Romania), Moravian Wallachia, Wales, Scotland, Ireland etc.

    – not to be confused with the same term Vlasi meaning herdsmen in Czech, Slovak, in Greek as Vláhi, also in Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian as vlah, used as a pejorative by the Ottomans to denote Christian Slavic migrants of the south-eastern peninsula, belonging to the social class of herdsmen.

    #380429

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    The fact with the Wallachian civilisation (Vlasi), the Celts, Gauls, Liburnians, Illyrians, Thracians, Dacians etc. the Romanised nations of the Roman empire in general, is that their culture was assimilated into the Roman one, far earlier than the Slavs came to old Europe. We can only assume which tradition they had prior to that, if not stated in the historical documents. Their descendents the Wallachians (meaning Roman People in Slavic and Germanic languages – colloquially known as Vlachs/Vlasi) were largely assimilated into the Slavic/Germanic nations, eventhough some stayed preserved till today, Irish, Scots, Romanians, Aromanian/south-eastern Vlachs etc. The European regions and states evolved out of that old Europe are: Wallachia (Romania), Moravian Wallachia, Wales, Scotland, Ireland etc.

    So it's not Illyrian (possibly) and it's not Slavic?

    #380430

    Anonymous

    Taken from here: Slavic pagan masks in Russia

    Svyatka masks from ancient Novgorod:

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    Reconstruction of masks of goat, bear and bull:

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    Mask of bear:

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    Pictures of V. Ryabchikov "Russian winter":

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    #380431

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Nice Al locului. These maska that Bulgarians use are similar to Zvončari that one could see in Croatia, Slovenia and Serbia, however i think these Bulgarian masks have pre-slavic origin. Not sure is it Dacian, Thracian or something else

    It's possible to have Dacian origins, as Romanian ones have, thinking of similarities.
    I wanted to ask you, Slavic people use similar ones in the ritual which is in the beginning of november, right (in Polish Dziady)? Can you post some of them; if I understood well, you are a priest (Pol. żerca) ?  Sorry for Polish words, but I don't know in other slavic language these words.

    The masks that you use in Croatia for Veles ritual are wonderful, as I could see in this topic started by you: http://www.slavorum.com/index.php/topic,112.msg209.html#msg209

    #380432

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Taken from here: Slavic pagan masks in Russia

    Svyatka masks from ancient Novgorod:

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    Reconstruction of masks of goat, bear and bull:

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    Mask of bear:

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    Pictures of V. Ryabchikov "Russian winter":

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    Please, can you describe the meaning of the masks from the paintings of V. Ryabchikov "Russian winter" ( I'm very thankful for the paintings, otherwise I would never found informations about this russian custom)? Is this ritual at the end of december? Cause then we may have the same custom :

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    Povhec, you made my evening more beautiful because of the masks that you posted. Can you also post some informations about them?

    #380433

    Anonymous

    Some related topics you may be interested in Koledo (watch the video), Vučari.

    #380435

    Anonymous

    Thanks, Cvetinov :). It helps.

    #380436

    Anonymous

    Ok thanks. No problem i will post detailed info about them tomorow. They are mostly used in fertility ceremonies and for banishing winter.

    #380437

    Anonymous

    Yes, Cvetinov is totally right, there are painted the celebration of Kolyada day on the pictures. It was probably on of the most famous pagan holydays among Eastern Slavs.

    #380441

    Anonymous

    Masks are used also in Slovak folklore, mostly during Fašiangy or Turíce feast days; then also during the Winter solstice (Kračún, Koleda) – now under the term Christmas; and a mask can be also found during the Burning of Morena feast (these feasts are of an old Slavic pagan origin) and so on. Their original meaning is to protect people and their property against the evil, because the evil is the most active during the winter. They also bring prosperity and fertility to the fields and people. The third meaning is comedic (parody on policemen, priests, jews, Turks, soldiers, butchers, clowns, beggars, prostitutes, gypsies, weepers, retarded persons etc). The masks are made of magical material – a straw, fur, baby doll, bells, twig, roasting-jack…; they do magical acts – jumping, stealing, fake death and revival, rolling on the ground, scavengery of house, erotic gestures, touching people, dance, giving a gift…  The more scary mask is, the greater magical impact on people it has. The Church tried to forbid the masks, but it failed.

    Slameník, slamený dzedo, dzedo, snopek, kurina baba – a mask made of straw symbolizing the prosperity
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    Turoň, turôň, chriapa – a mask symbolizing a bovid as a strong and fertile animal
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    Medveď – a bear symbolizing the strength. Sometimes the bear is interpreted as Ded – an old man – which represents the cult of ancestors.

    Kôň – a horse symbolizing the happiness, luck, fortune
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    Koza – a goat symbolizing the fertility
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    Čert, pľuhavec, pokušiteľ, priepasnik, pekelník, zlý duch – a devil symbolizing the evil

    Morena, Mara, Marmuriena, Muriena – Goddess Morena as a doll made of straw and clothes

    Lucie – Lucie feast day. Christian St. Lucy replaced Goddess Mokosha, though the old pagan magic is still alive.

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    Other demonic masks like e.g. Smrť (Death), Vodník (Water sprite), Černokňažník (Warlock), Striga (Witch)…

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