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  • #345711

    Anonymous

    Found a good study about Rusyns.  Covers culture and history and the competing ethnic ideologies of the Rusyn people.  My own views from this are that

    1.  The Rusyn population was scattered  and divided.  This made a strong nationalist movement difficult.

    2.  Magyarization dampened nationalism

    3.  New World immigration also made national identity difficult.  It released economic pressure that might have lead to  serious revolt against Magyar misrule.

    4.  Seems like the Rusyn intelligentsia could never decide on a Russian, Ukrainian or separate national identity.

    5.  The idea of Rusyn identification seems to have been dormant under communist rule.  Was more an identity in the USA.  Especially in the Northeast and Rust Belt.

    https://repository.library.georgetown.edu/bitstream/handle/10822/552816/WiktorekAlexandraChristine.pdf?sequence=1

    #420802

    Anonymous

    Ivan Franko was a famous Rusyn who became Ukrainian.

    All Ukrainians were "Rusyns" (Rusini) at one point. Some just decided not to adopt Ukrainization, and remained (became) Rusyns.

    #420803

    Anonymous

    same goes for belarusians.

    #420804

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Ivan Franko was a famous Rusyn who became Ukrainian.

    All Ukrainians were "Rusyns" (Rusini) at one point. Some just decided not to adopt Ukrainization, and remained (became) Rusyns.

    Rusini is a Polish term. In Ukrainian the word 'Rusini'  spelled as Русини. There's a difference between  sounds represented by 'и' and 'i' in Ukrainian. Ukrainian 'i' is similar to a soft version of  'i' in Slavic languages, while there's no equivalent of Ukrainian 'и' in English.  Ukrainian 'и' is a softer version of Russian 'ы' letter.  So, Русини is transiliterated in Latin as Rusyny.  In English – Rusyns plural. I am not sure how Русини themselves pronounce and spell their ethnonym.

    People living on the territories of ancient Rus' were identifying themselves as Ruthenians/Russians (both are similar in Slavic) throughout history. Although, some people didn't keep the ethnonym
    continiously, while others adopted another ethnonym.

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