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  • #342371

    Anonymous

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    Slava
    (Serbian Cyrillic: Слава), also called Krsna Slava (Крсна Слава), is the Serbian tradition of the ritual celebration and veneration of a family's own patron saint. The family celebrates the Slava annually on the patron saint's feast day. The Slava is a tradition of the Serbs, who are a people now living in the modern states of Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina (mostly in Republika Srpska), Republic of Macedonia and Montenegro, as well as in the former Military Frontier (parts of modern states of Croatia, Hungary, and Romania). The Serbs regard the Slava as one of their most significant feast days. The tradition of the slava is also preserved among the Serbian diaspora.

    History
    The Slava (glorification) is a result of the Serbs' Christianization transforming the Indo-European custom of communal feasts into a Christian custom. Many elements of Serbian pre-Christian culture have lived on in Christianity. The Serbs were a polytheistic Slavic tribe that believed in several gods, such as Svetovid (God of war, fertility and abundance) and Dabog (Sun god, a culture hero and a source of wealth and power). Each household had a protective god (protector of the family) that it venerated, a custom that was assimilated into Serbian Christianity. Christian saints replaced the Slavic deities, and the ritual itself survives as a national custom of the Serbs.

      [li]Svetovid > Saint Vitus > Vidovdan[/li]
      [li]Perun > Saint Elijah > Ilindan[/li]
      [li]Veles > Saint Nicholas > Nikoljdan[/li]

    It is believed to be a remnant from Slavic paganism which had a myriad of gods before adopting Christianity. The Serbs in particular held strongly onto their old Slavic religion; the last pagan temple in Serbia, in Svetovid, was destroyed by Tsar Dušan in the 14th century. That the Slava often varies according to geographical regions is claimed as evidence of the above. But even this notion need not contradict the traditional explanation that the Slava is celebrated on the day of christening of the first-baptized ancestor, and in fact, it may very well underscore it.

      [li]"Gde je Slava, tu je Srbin"
      ("Where there is a Slava, there is a Serb")
      [size=8pt]-Serbian saying[/size][/li]
    #366552

    Anonymous

    On what day does this patron saint's feast / Slava occur ?

    #366553

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    On what day does this patron saint's feast / Slava occur ?

    Every Serbian family has it's own patron, hence it occures on the individual patrons day. The patron is inherited paternally, from generation to generation, it was took on a day when the family was baptized 1000'some years ago, translating the pagan Slavic Patron, into a Roman Christian one. (Most of the Serbian traditions are old Slavic with Christian coating, made the Christianization easier I guess.)


      [li]For example my Slava is Perun, or St. Elijah after we adopted Christianity. It is on the second of august.[/li]
    #366554

    Anonymous

    Peculiar that only serbs kept this slavic trait, our resentment or lack of enthusiasm towards God was great in the early days haha.

    Anyway got a idea of the Slava of St; John " Krstitelj Jovan " ?

    #366555

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Peculiar that only serbs kept this slavic trait, our resentment or lack of enthusiasm towards God was great in the early days haha.
    Anyway got a idea of the Slava of St; John " Krstitelj Jovan " ?

    St. John the baptist replaced Midsummer (summer solstice) or Slavic Kupala, "goddess of herbs, sorcery, sex, and midsummer."

    #366556

    Anonymous

    Thank you for the post about Slava.
    Is this going on anywhere else?

    I should look it up again, but I remember I read somewhere, think that Polabian Slavs had "kontine" (I can't remember the exact word) wooden houses where they would have their celebrations remembering their ancestors, usually particular one and their belongings on the walls, like wapons and such. This was a tribal gathering honouring the ancestor, it had nothing to do with gods.
    Maybe there's also a connection.

    Temnozora

    #366557

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    It is believed to be a remnant from Slavic paganism which had a myriad of gods before adopting Christianity.

    Actually, it's more than just believed. Experts in ethnology and anthropology all agree that Slava is the celebration of Slavic gods and goddesses.

    Quote:

      [li]For example my Slava is Perun, or St. Elijah after we adopted Christianity. It is on the second of august.[/li]

    If you don't mind, I'd like to add an explanation.

    St. Elijah is celebrated on July 20th – which is the day of god Perun. However, since Serbian Orthodox Church uses Julian calendar, currently July 20th of Julian calendar is August 2nd in common Western or Gregorian calendar. By the end of the century, due to differences between calendars St. Elijah will be celebrated on August 3rd of Gregorian calendar, but it will still be July 20th of Julian calendar.

    Same goes for other celebrations and festivities, e.g.  the day of god Jarilo which April 23rd, and this god is celebrated as st. George on April 23rd of Julian calendar or May 6th of Gregorian calendar.

    #366558

    Anonymous

    Sorry to bump this thread, but
    Dervan, sveti jovan is celebrated on the 20th of January, how could it have replaced midsummer?

    #366559

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Sorry to bump this thread, but Dervan, sveti jovan is celebrated on the 20th of January, how could it have replaced midsummer?

    St. John is also celebrated on July 7 – Ivanjdan.

    "According to the Serbian Orthodox Church. Saint John (Sveti Jovan) is known by the name Igritelj (dancer) because it is thought the sun is dancing on this day. Among traditions are that girls watch the sunrise through their wreath, to become red as the sun, towards the evening in the heights, Ivanjske vatre (kresovi, bonfire) are lit, and dancing and singing takes place. It is a tradition for people to become Godfathers and blood brothers on this day, as John is a symbol of character and rectitude."

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midsummer#Serbia

    #366560

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Sorry to bump this thread, but
    Dervan, sveti jovan is celebrated on the 20th of January, how could it have replaced midsummer?
    Quote:
    St. John is also celebrated on July 7 – Ivanjdan.

    "According to the Serbian Orthodox Church. Saint John (Sveti Jovan) is known by the name Igritelj (dancer) because it is thought the sun is dancing on this day. Among traditions are that girls watch the sunrise through their wreath, to become red as the sun, towards the evening in the heights, Ivanjske vatre (kresovi, bonfire) are lit, and dancing and singing takes place. It is a tradition for people to become Godfathers and blood brothers on this day, as John is a symbol of character and rectitude."

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midsummer#Serbia

    Isn't the winter st John (December 27th by our calendar) the evangelist and the summer st John the baptist? At least in the Catholic church. Here we bless the wine on John the Evangelist's day and jumping over fires was traditionally done on John the Baptist's day. Don't know how this aplies to Orthodox traditions though …

    #366561

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    St. John is also celebrated on July 7 – Ivanjdan.

    The synaxis is celebrated on the 20th of January though, did that celebration replace any kind of pagan one?

    #366562

    Anonymous

    How do the younger families (the ones not tracfing their ancestry for 1k years) figure out what their patron saint is?Did the priests assign it to them,and did it have to do anything with the family name,or did they pick a saint that was close to their worldview?

    #366563

    Anonymous

    Very good. Slava is very interesting cultural heritage. Cvetinov I red somewhere that some catholic families in Montenegro have Slava. Do you know anything about that?

    #366564

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Very good. Slava is very interesting cultural heritage. Cvetinov I red somewhere that some catholic families in Montenegro have Slava. Do you know anything about that?

    I know that many Montenegrin's have slava, but the majority of Montenegrin's identify as being Serbian I think, so they'd be Orthodox.

    #366565

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    How do the younger families (the ones not tracfing their ancestry for 1k years) figure out what their patron saint is?Did the priests assign it to them,and did it have to do anything with the family name,or did they pick a saint that was close to their worldview?

    It is transferred from generation to generation. Every family celebrates two Slava's a year. A man chooses one Slava (of two) from his family, and the female (wife) does the same, when two people form a family. To be more precise, every household celebrates two Slava's, one is from a male's family, and another from a female's.

    We also have "Preslava" or "Zavetina". Here's something in Serbian about it: "Pojedina sela i gradovi imaju svoju slavu koja se zove preslava ili zavetina. Oni su uzeli jednoga svetitelja ili praznik i preko njega se mole Bogu za svako dobro i napredak. Zatim se mole Bogu da ih čuva od bolesti, poplava, suše, grada, zemljotresa i drugih nepogoda i nesreća."

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