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  • #343955

    Anonymous

    [size=14pt]Slava[/size]

    The Slava (lit. "glory"; Cyrillic: Слава), also called Krsna Slava (Крсна Слава, "christened Slava") and Krsno ime (Крсно име, "christened name"), is the Orthodox tradition of the ritual glorification of one's family's patron saint among Serbs, Montenegrins and Macedonians. The family celebrates the Slava annually on the saint's feast day.
    The Slava is most associated with the Serbs, who consider it a national tradition. They are most conscientious in its observation and regard the Slava as their most significant feast days. The tradition of the slava is also preserved among the Serbian diaspora. The Slava is also recorded among other ethnic groups in Northern Albania, Montenegro, as well as among the Gorani in Kosovo, a ****** Slavic ethnic group.

    image

    Slava (glorification) is a result of the Serbs' Christianization transforming the Indo-European custom of communal feasts into a Christian custom. It was established by the first  Archbishop of the autocephalous Serbian Church St. Sava (Rastko Nemanjić). Many elements of Serbian pre-Christian culture have lived on in Christianity. The Serbs were a polytheistic Slavic tribe that believed in several gods, such as Svetovid (God of war, fertility and abundance) and Dažbog (Sun god, a culture hero and a source of wealth and power). Each household had a protective god (protector of the family) that it venerated, a custom that was assimilated into Serbian Christianity. Christian saints replaced the Slavic deities, and the ritual itself survives as a national custom of the Serbs.

    Svetovid > Saint Vitus > Vidovdan
    Perun > Saint Elijah[6] > Ilindan
    Veles > Saint Nicholas > Nikoljdan

    The custom in its modern state was created with the exposure to Christianity during the reign of emperor Heraclius (610-641) or later at the time of the final Christianization of the Serbs during the rule of Basil I (867-886) by Byzantine missionairies of Constantinople Cyril and Methodius.

    Slavski kolač, literally 'slava cake', is a loaf of bread that has an important role in the celebration of the slava.
    According to Constantine's DAI a Serbian tribe named „Pagani“ (what Constantine himself translates as “unbaptized in the Slavic tongue” (DAI, 29, 81) indicates that the others were already Christianized. Some believe that the day of the mass baptism itself was taken as the saint protector, others claim that each clan adopted its collective protector, while others still claim that the Slava is simply the saint which replaced a pre-existing pagan god-protector. At times, a new Slava would be adopted, should a saint be believed to have interceded for some sort of deliverance (i.e., from illness or affliction). The new saint would be adopted in lieu of the old, whose day would still be marked by a lighting of a candle, with much less fanfare.

    Some also believe the Slava to be a remnant from Slavic paganism which had a myriad of gods before adopting Christianity. The Serbs in particular held strongly onto their old Slavic religion that the Slava often varies according to geographical regions is claimed as evidence of the above. But even this notion need not contradict the traditional explanation that the Slava is celebrated on the day of christening of the first-baptized ancestor, and in fact, it may very well underscore it.
    The Slava was canonically introduced by Archbishop Saint Sava of the Serbian Orthodox Church.

    "Gde je Slava, tu je Srbin"
    ("Where there is a Slava, there is a Serb")
    -Serbian saying

    Unlike most customs that are common for an entire people, each family separately celebrates its own saint; of course, there is quite a bit of overlap. It is inherited from the head of the household—normally the father—to sons. Daughters inherit the slava only if they stay in the home, while married women normally celebrate their husbands' saint.
    Each household has one or two celebrations per year (depending on the saint in question, for some have two days devoted to them). Yet, only one is the main day of the patron saint feast (and not necessarily the same of the two days for all families); the second celebration is referred to as "Little Slava" or Preslava.
    Some families may also celebrate yet another saint to a lesser extent (for example, when the wife is the only descendant of her kinship so the tradition of her slava would otherwise be lost).
    Should a particular household move far away, with the father's permission, a son might celebrate the Slava in his own home; usually, however, for as long as a family patriarch is alive, his sons should celebrate under his roof.
    Actually, the sons should celebrate slava with their father only if they live together. If they have separate households, and they do not live together, then they should celebrate separately. Of course, if the father is alive, the son is asking for his permission. The son will then celebrate for the last time with the father, and he will get a half of the slavski kolac to start celebrating in his own home. There is some confusion about this. Not long ago, all sons lived in the same household with the father so, it was obvious that they will celebrate together. But, as Serbian society started changing, a lot of members of the family moved to cities and started living separately. Today, there are no more large families like before, father with sons and grandsons in one home.

    #394768

    Anonymous

    There are allready two threads about it :D
    Anyway,
    Добро нам дошао. Могоао би да се представиш у секцији за то

    #394769

    Anonymous

    Aww sorry didn't notice. Should I just remove it or?
    In any case.. Bolje vas našao ;)!

    #394770

    Anonymous

    I dont believe so :) Maybe mods could join them. :)

    #394771

    Anonymous

    image

    I'll go first.

    I am Jovandan

    image

    20.Januar, representing Slavic god Kresnik, the god of fire.

    #394772

    Anonymous

    Kresnik is in Serbia also? In Slovenia Kresnik is equated with John the Baptist and therefore was celebrated on June 24.

    #394773

    Anonymous

    According to folk tradition I'm not sure, it's just what I saw was the equivalent for St. Jovan. If it's for you, it's probably for us too.

    #394774

    Anonymous

    On Slava, do you celebrate Jovan, or Kresnik?

    #394775

    Anonymous

    Svevlad you cant celebrate mythological persons on Christian hollydays. On Slava you celebrate patron saint of your family. As weallready were discussing previously in folk believes (not in Church) some Christian Saints were associated with atributes of Slavic dieties (for example St. Elijas-Perun, St.Blasius (protector of cattle)-Veles) etc, but it is all. Anyway, mention of Kresnik is not preserved in Serbian mythology. Young Obilic just found it somewhere on Interent I believe.

    #394776

    Anonymous

    slava: st. Micheal
    poslava:st. Aleksandar Nevski
    Vasojevići won all major battles against Turks and Albos on these two dates, that's why we celebrate them as our patron saints.

    #394777

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Svevlad you cant celebrate mythological persons on Christian hollydays. On Slava you celebrate patron saint of your family. As weallready were discussing previously in folk believes (not in Church) some Christian Saints were associated with atributes of Slavic dieties (for example St. Elijas-Perun, St.Blasius (protector of cattle)-Veles) etc, but it is all. Anyway, mention of Kresnik is not preserved in Serbian mythology. Young Obilic just found it somewhere on Interent I believe.

    Of course, and your Slava? I simply added the "Slavic god" part to elaborate on the folk aspect of the celebration. The Slavic god-Christian saint parallels have had plenty of written work & research by scholars already.

    #394778

    Anonymous

    Sveti Ilija Gromovnik (St. Elijah the Thunderer) – attributed to Perun the Thunderer

    [table]
    [tr]
    [td][img height=300]http://adavinic.files.wordpress.com/2012/08/sv-ilija.jpg” />[/td]
    [td][img height=300]http://epika.org/epika/slavic/perun/perun-lightning.jpg” />[/td]
    [/tr]
    [/table]

    Perun was most often mentioned and frequently satanised in the Christian notes from the early middle ages. The Church satanised Perun, probably because of his strong cult and strong influence on people's lives. After the arrival of Christianity, the role of Perun was taken over by St. Elijah. Perun, as well as the stories about him remained in the folk tradition, but some of them took the form of St Elijah stories, and the others had to change the name of the main character.

    – Text taken from Epika, link (really nice pictures btw.)

    #394779

    Anonymous

    Slava sounds like fun. Anyone know why it was created? And why it only spread among Serbs?

    #394780

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Slava sounds like fun. Anyone know why it was created? And why it only spread among Serbs?

    Just read yourself through the forum – Slava

    #394781

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Just read yourself through the forum – Slava

    Ok, so why did it only spread among Serbs? The thread says it was a 'Indo-European custom of communal feasts', so there should be other people who have a similar thing.

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