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  • #343239

    Anonymous

    I'm thinking of presenting one artist at a time, with a short bio and pictures. The timeframe is 19-21 century.

    Wladislaw Bakalovich:
    "…Bakalowicz studied at the Warsaw School of Fine Arts from 1849 to 1854. In 1863 he left for France; he settled permanently in Paris and became a French citizen. The artist was married to actress Wiktoryna Szymanowska. Their son Stefan was also a painter.

    Early in his career Bakalowicz painted portraits, genre scenes, and historical canvases on Polish themes. These earlier works include King Zygmunt August and Barbara Radziwill, Prince Karol Radziwill Receiving a delegation of Bar Confederates, and Bazaar Outside the Iron Gates. His most representative works, however, are genre scenes drawn from sixteenth- and seventeenth- century French history, especially the court of Henry III Valois. Executed in oil, pastel, or watercolor, these small-scale compositions reveal Bakalowicz`s fondness for the realistic rendering of details of costume and interior. Sources for the artist`s treatments can be found in Dutch masters and in the contemporary works of Ernest Meissonier, influences that are particularly evident ,for example, in Lord Buckingham at the Court of Louis XIII, and Episode from St. Bartholomewis Night.

    Bakalowicz`s work was well received by the French and internationally, and he exhibited at the Paris salons (1865, 1883), in such provincial cities as Lyons, Bordaux, Reims, Rouen , Nice, and Pau, and also in London, Brussels, Berlin, Viennam and New Uork. Two full-length portraits were shown at the Loan Exhibition of the Polish Paintings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1944. Bakalowicz remained in constant contact with Poland and participated in exhibitions at the Warsaw "Zacheta" Society of Fine Arts, the Krakow Society of Fine Arts, and the Warsaw salon of Alexander Krywult, where posthumous exhibitions were mounted in 1904 and 1906. The artist`s paintings are in museum collections in Warsaw, Krakow, and Radom, as well as in many private collections in Poland and abroad…."http://www.thekf.org/gallery/artists/Bakalowicz/

    "Lovers"
    [img width=463 height=700]http://artyzm.com/obrazy/Bakalowicz-Lovers.jpg” />

    "Coming out of Church"
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    The site didn't have the name of that one:
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    #382073

    Anonymous

    Very nice thread. I'm happy that you are interested in art. Thumbs up for you  :). But I have to make a correction: Wladislaw Bakalovich is not a modern artist. He is classical with let's say maybe a bit of romantic thouch. Modern art starts indeed in 19th century, but late 19th century. Maybe you can change the thread to something like "art in 19-21 century in Slavic countries"? In this way, you will have a biger frame for different currents. It's just a sugestion:).

    Jonasz Stern (1904-1988). Polish artist, he is in most of National Art Museums in Poland. He uses bones in this works:

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    [img width=700 height=567]http://art.findartinfo.com/images/artwork/2009/7/a002034486-001.jpg” />

    #382074

    Anonymous

    One more photo from Stern, the best one:

    http://www.imnk.pl/gallerybox.php?dir=XX144&mode=2

    Jan Lebenstein (Poland): http://www.jkkfinearts.com/Lebenstein/index.html

    Born in 1930. Died in 1999. One of the most famous contemporary Polish painters, printmakers, and illustrators. From 1948 to 1954 he studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw. He emigrated to France in 1959 in the wake of the Grand Prix awarded to him at the first Biennale of the Young in Paris. Lebenstein's works were soon put on display at two exhibit in Paris in Galerie Lacloche and Lambert, in Sweden and Holland, at the Documenta 2 in Kassel and the Biennial  in Venice and Sao Paulo. There is hardly a capital in the world in which he has not had an individual exhibition. With the series "Abominable Creatures","Bestiaria" and "Carnet Intime" he entered the archetypal, existential, and profoundly meaningful world of animal and human images. Half-human, half-bestial monsters were usually executed in dark colors quietly threatened each other and performed gloomy and secret rituals. Since 1958 when his "Small Figure in Blue Frame" was presented to Guggenheim International Award Lebenstein's works were shown at almost twenty collective exhibitions in the United States, e.g., in Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1961 and 1966, National Gallery in Washington,DC in 1963, Carnegie Institute in Pittsburgh in 1961,1964, and 1967, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art in 1962, Spertus Museum of Judaica in Chicago in 1975, Frye Art Museum in Seattle in 1993. His works were included into collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Spertus Museum of Art of the Notre Dame University,Indiana, and in the Hirshhom Museum in Washington,DC. Hundreds of works from the late 1950' and 1960' could be found now in the most prestigious and discriminating private collections in the United States, Europe, and Japan. His works had found their way into the collections of famous politicians as vice-president Nelson Rockefeller, philanthropists as John D. Rockefeller III, businessmen's as David G. Thompson, Joseph H. Hirshhorn, Jan Mitchell, writers as Joseph Alsop, Mary McCarthy, John Canaday and many others.

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    [img width=350 height=700]http://polscy-malarze.pl/lebenstein/lebenstein_2.jpg” />

    [img width=700 height=471]http://mag.trolbooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/Lebenstein0001.gif” />

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    [img width=700 height=345]http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_62jkgTBSn1k/TGaCZE_bg9I/AAAAAAAAAc0/TbFuqxofMx0/s1600/Jan+Lebenstein.jpg” />

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    #382075

    Anonymous

    Jacek Malczewski (Symbolist artist, 1854-1926)

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    [img width=700 height=507]http://polandpoland.com/malczewski-1.jpg” />

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    [img width=428 height=700]http://www.pinakoteka.zascianek.pl/Malczewski_J/Images/Eloe.jpg” />

    [img width=700 height=566]http://g1b2i3.files.wordpress.com/2011/06/jacek-malczewski-autoportret-z-muza.jpg” />

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    #382076

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Very nice thread. I'm happy that you are interested in art. Thumbs up for you  :). But I have to make a correction: Wladislaw Bakalovich is not a modern artist. He is classical with let's say maybe a bit of romantic thouch. Modern art starts indeed in 19th century, but late 19th century. Maybe you can change the thread to something like "art in 19-21 century in Slavic countries"? In this way, you will have a biger frame for different currents. It's just a sugestion:).

    I'm so grad you are joining me here, Al locului :)
    Thanks for the correction, but most lamentably I missed the time when I could correct the name of the thread it with the "modify" icon. But I can open another thread especially for Classical Slavic artists :) – there are plenty of those, so one more thread for art would be just fine. But this time I'm going to post it in the Graphic Art subforum, because it will fit better there.

    #382077

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I'm so grad you are joining me here, Al locului :)
    Thanks for the correction, but most lamentably I missed the time when I could correct the name of the thread it with the "modify" icon. But I can open another thread especially for Classical Slavic artists :) – there are plenty of those, so one more thread for art would be just fine. But this time I'm going to post it in the Graphic Art subforum, because it will fit better there.

    I would join you also in Classical Slavic artists, but I don't really know them. I wasn't very atracted by this current, so I have a lack of culture in Classicism. I checked already your post there :). Keep posting, I'm curious.

    Alexei Golovin is very interesting; I will also come with some new artists (this time women :) ) in this thread very soon.

    #382082

    Anonymous

    Magdalena Abakanowicz– Poland: http://www.abakanowicz.art.pl/    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magdalena_Abakanowicz

    Biography
    1930 Born in Falenty, Poland
    1950/54 Studies at the Academy of Fine Arts, Warsaw, Poland.
    1954/60 Paints series of large gouaches on paper and canvas.
    1960s Creates monumental three-dimensional forms called "Abakans", made out of materials woven by herself in her own technique.
    1970s Changes scale and material. Creates huge cycles of figurative and non-figurative sculptures made out of burlap and resins, called "Alterations".
    1980s Creates series of monumental sculptures using bronze, stone, wood and iron. Installs permanent outdoor "spaces to experience" in Italy, Israel, S.Korea, Germany and America.
    1990/91 Upon the invitation of the Paris authorities concerning the enlargement of the Great Axis of Paris, she designs Arboreal Architecture, her concept of a modern, ecological city, in which buildings organic in shape, are vertical gardens. Creates "Bronze Crowd", group of 36 figures.
    1992/93 Continues to work on "War Games" – huge tree trunks armed with steel. Begins the cycle of "Hand-like Trees" – vertical bronze forms.
    1994/97 Designs and choreographs dances deriving from her sculptures, performed by "Asbestos", the Japanese Butoh dance group. Creates "Hurma", 150 children figures and "Backward Standing", 60 figures of adults. Creates cycles of monumental metaphoric bronze heads, animals and birds follows.
    1998/99 Creates huge oval forms out of concrete -"The Space of Unknown Growth"- in Europe Parkas, Lithuania. Creates first groups of "walking figures" out of burlap, then also out of bronze.
    2000 Creates a bronze "Crowd of 95 Figures" standing and walking.
    2001 Creates two big groups of walking figures. Installs compositions of six birds out of aluminum
    2002 Installs "Unrecognised" – 112 iron cast figures larger than human size, as a permanent display in the Citadel Park in Poznan, Poland.
    2003 Inauguration of "Space of Stone", 22 granite blocks, installed permanently in a specially prepared space at Grounds For Sculpture, Hamilton, New Jersey.
    At the same time the "Open Air Aquarium", 30 stainless steel welded fish on the riverfront in Philadelphia, is inaugurated.
    2003/04 The group of "20 Big Figures" (260 cm = 8'8'') is being permanently installed in front of the Princeton University Art Museum, USA.
    2006 November: Installation of "Agora" – a large permanent project for Chicago Grant Park consisting of 106 iron cast figures, each about 9 feet tall. The largest figurative sculpture of our time.

    She has been Professor at the Academy of Fine Arts, Poznan, Poland (1965 – 1990) and Visiting Professor at the U.C.L.A. (1984).
    Magdalena Abakanowicz lives and works in Warsaw.

    Selected Doctorates and Honors
    1974 Received honoris causa doctorate from the Royal College of Art, London, England
    1992 Received honoris causa doctorate from the Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, Rhode Island, USA
    1998 Received honoris causa doctorate from the Academy of Fine Arts, Lodz, Poland
    2000 Received an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degree, Pratt Institute, New York
    2001 Received honoris causa doctorate from the Massachusetts College of Art, Boston, U.S.A.
    2002 Received honoris causa doctorate from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, USA
    2002 Received honoris causa doctorate from the Academy of Fine Arts in Poznan, Poland
     
    1994 Elected honorary member of the Akademie der Kunste, Berlin
    1996 Elected honorary member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, N.Y., U.S.A.
    1998 Elected honorary member of the Sachsische Akademie der Kunste, Dresden, Germany
    2000 Orden Pour le merite fur Wissenschaften und Kunste, Berlin, Germany

    Selected Awards and Prizes
    1965 Grand Prix of Sao Paolo Biennale, Sao Paolo, Brazil
    1979 Gottfried von Herder Prize, Vienna, Austria
    1982 Alfred Jurzykowski Prize, New York
    1993 Award for Distinction in Sculpture, granted by the Sculpture Center, New York
    1997 Leonardo da Vinci World Award of Arts, Mexico
    1998 Commander Cross with Star of the Order of Polonia Restituta
    1999 Officier de L' Ordre des Arts et des Lettres, Paris, France
    2000 Cavaliere nell Ordine Al Merito della Repubblica Italiana
    2000 Visionaries! Award granted by American Craft Museum
    2005 Award for the entire Creative Activity granted by the Polish Minister of Culture Lifetime Achievement Award bestowed by the International Sculpture Center in New York

    I posted few photos from her site ilustrating different themes/series:

    Seated figures:

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    Crowds:

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    Heads:

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    Backs:

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    Abakans:

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    War games (probabily this theme will be the most interesting for many of you):

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    Skulls:

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    Agora:

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    #382083

    Anonymous

    Witold Wojtkiewicz:  http://www.pinakoteka.zascianek.pl/Wojtkiewicz/Index.htm

    [img width=700 height=597]http://www.pinakoteka.zascianek.pl/Wojtkiewicz/Images/Ucieczka.jpg” />

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    [img width=700 height=561]http://www.pinakoteka.zascianek.pl/Wojtkiewicz/Images/Lalki.jpg” />

    [img width=567 height=700]http://www.pinakoteka.zascianek.pl/Wojtkiewicz/Images/Rozpustnica.jpg” />

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    [img width=700 height=505]http://www.pinakoteka.zascianek.pl/Wojtkiewicz/Images/Podmuchy_wiosenne.jpg” />

    [img width=700 height=462]http://www.pinakoteka.zascianek.pl/Wojtkiewicz/Images/Manifestacja.jpg” />

    [img width=700 height=501]http://www.pinakoteka.zascianek.pl/Wojtkiewicz/Images/Na_wiec.jpg” />

    [img width=700 height=460]http://www.pinakoteka.zascianek.pl/Wojtkiewicz/Images/Uczta.jpg” />

    [img width=700 height=558]http://www.pinakoteka.zascianek.pl/Wojtkiewicz/Images/Wegetacja.jpg” />

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    [img width=700 height=490]http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_GpTfXJRK1nY/ScpRcCDoP3I/AAAAAAAAAnE/F5oY6WdPeV8/s1600/Bajka_o_rycerzu+wojtkiewicz.jpg” />

    #382084

    Anonymous

    Vladimir Fedorovich Stozharov was born in Moscow in 1926. Like so many of the best Moscow artists of his generation (the Tkachev brothers and Geli Korzhev among them) he entered the Moscow Intermediate Art School before World War II. Stozharov was a student at the school from 1939 till 1945, in other words during his teen years; here he was taught by V.V.Pochitalov (an impressionist-influenced painter who was the school's guiding hand), A.P.Shorchev and P.T.Koshevoi. This was followed by six years of training, from 1945 to 1951, at Moscow's elite Surikov Institute, where he worked in the studio of the well-known realist G.K.Savitski (himself the son of one of the leading Itinerants). Stozharov began exhibiting in 1953 and took part in some 30 exhibitions in the next five years alone. He soon established himself as an outstanding figure. Together with the master of the older generation, Arkadi Plastov, Stozharov spearheaded the move to Russia country subjects among painters after the death of Stalin. This move was broadly paralleled by the well known "village prosc" movement in Russian literature. He specialized in provincial landscapes, especially of the Russian North, which he executed in a broad, vigorous manner, often using a characteristic wide, panoramic format. The peasants who appear in Stozharov's paintings are always rooted in the landscape: in stark contrast to much socialist realism, people are not portrayed as heroic masters of the Russian soil, but as its undemonstrative, yet time-honored, inhabitants. Stozharov was an enormous influence on his contemporaries. His honors included membership of the USSR Academy of Arts; and in 1968 a prestigious Repin Prize (the Russian State Prize for art). He died in Moscow in 1973, not yet fifty years old. One man shows of his paintings were held in the Russian regions – in those Northern places such as Syktyvkar, Vologda, and Kalinin (Tver), where he liked to work – in 1974, and in Moscow in 1977. Today he is recognized as one of the classic figures in the history of twentieth century Russian realism.

    Vladimir Stozharov – Владимир Стожаров (Maler)

    A large collection of Vladimir Stozharov's paintings is at  http://www.stozharov.com/index.php?id=65&lang=eng

    #382085

    Anonymous

    Kudesnik, thank you for posting the paintings of Vladimir Fedorovich Stozharov. I would't find him easily, beacause I'm associating modern Russian art with Malevici, Kandinsky and Chagall and I didn't knew about this traditional way of painting in that period.

    Kazimir Malevici:

    [img width=700 height=463]http://www.maripictori.ro/Poze/95/cop.jpg” />

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    Some nice Russians peasents:

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    And to not forget one of the most important works of him :

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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kazimir_Malevich

    #382086

    Anonymous

    Chagall :

    http://www.famousartistsgallery.com/gallery/chagall.html
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    [img width=545 height=700]http://theeyesofmyeyes.files.wordpress.com/2010/05/marc-chagall.jpg” />

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    #382087

    Anonymous

    Wassily Kandinsky:

    I prefer his early works, inspired by russian folklore, but this is my personal taste. He is an extremly important figure in art history and it's condidered that he made the first abstract painting.THe story of it is something like this: one day he sees in his workshop a very interesting work, but he doesn't know to who it belongs. When he came closer, he realise that is his own work, put it with upside down. From that momemt he decide to leave the figurative painting for abstract art :
    Here you can see the evolution of his style: http://www.wikipaintings.org/en/wassily-kandinsky/st-george-and-the-dragon#close
    First abstract watercolor:
    [img width=700 height=536]http://www.shafe.co.uk/crystal/images/lshafe/Kandinsky_First_Abstract_Watercolour_1910.jpg” />
    Other works:
    [img width=700 height=463]http://www.artgalleryabc.com/images/kandinsky49.jpg” />

    [img width=520 height=700]http://uploads1.wikipaintings.org/images/wassily-kandinsky/sky-blue-1940.jpg” />

    [img width=700 height=458]http://percaritatem.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/07/kandinsky-composition-x.jpg” />

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    [img width=700 height=607]http://0.tqn.com/d/arthistory/1/0/w/s/kandinsky_gugg_0910_20.jpg” />

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    If anyone is interested in his ealier period, when he was inspired by Russian folklore, look here:http://www.slavorum.com/index.php?topic=102.15

    #382088

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Kudesnik, thank you for posting the paintings of Vladimir Fedorovich Stozharov. I would't find him easily, beacause I'm associating modern Russian art with Malevici, Kandinsky and Chagall and I didn't knew about this traditional way of painting in that period.

    Social realism dominated that era …
    Nevertheless, Vladimir Stozharov was a well known and influential artist in USSR.Today, his paintings can be found in most galleries of  large cities of former USSR republics and beyond. He painted landscapes of the north of the country. I grew up and travelled in that region visiting small towns. His traditional paintings are appealling to me.

    Stozharov also painted ‘Still life’:  http://www.liveinternet.ru/users/aishagu/post222701948

    Kazimir Malevich is a renowned artist. Probably even more so his ‘Black Square’

    Arkady Plastov’s paintings: http://www.liveinternet.ru/users/3571405/post153170548/

    #382089

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Social realism dominated that era …
    Nevertheless, Vladimir Stozharov was a well known and influential artist in USSR.Today, his paintings can be found in most galleries of  large cities of former USSR republics and beyond. He painted landscapes of the north of the country. I grew up and travelled in that region visiting small towns. His traditional paintings are appealling to me.

    Stozharov also painted ‘Still life’:  http://www.liveinternet.ru/users/aishagu/post222701948

    Kazimir Malevich is a renowned artist. Probably even more so his ‘Black Square’

    Arkady Plastov’s paintings: http://www.liveinternet.ru/users/3571405/post153170548/

    Now I realized that we are speaking about a bit different periods: I was thinking about the beginning of XX century, when Russia was very important for abstract art and avant-garde art, while you were speaking about what happened later in art, about social realism. Sorry, my fault.

    I don't like Stozharov's dead nature very much, because I don't like the genre. In my highschool, I needed to draw it every week and I think that dead nature is quite monotone and not very creative, but I have to say that two paintings of Stozharov from the link that you posted I really enjoy:

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    Especially the first one really has slavic spirit.

     

    #382090

    Anonymous

    As a great admirer of surrealism, classical and modern, I can't help but bring up:

    Zdzisław Beksiński 
    (24 February 1929 – 21 February 2005)

    A renowned Polish painter, photographer, and sculptor who is best known as a fantasy artist. Beksiński executed his paintings and drawings either in what he called a 'Baroque' or a 'Gothic' manner. The first style is dominated by representation, with the best-known examples coming from his 'fantastic realism' period when he painted disturbing images of a surrealistic, nightmarish environment. The second style is more abstract, being dominated by form, and is typified by Beksiński's later paintings. Beksiński was murdered in 2005.

    Beksiński was born in the town of Sanok, in southern Poland. After studying architecture in Kraków, he returned to Sanok in 1955. Subsequent to this education, he spent several years as a construction site supervisor, which he hated. At that time, he became interested in artistic photography and photomontage, sculpture and painting. He made his sculptures of plaster, metal and wire. His photography had several themes that would also appear in his future paintings, presenting wrinkled faces, landscapes and objects with a very bumpy texture, which he attempted to emphasize (especially by manipulating lights and shadows). His photography also depicted disturbing images, such as a mutilated baby doll with its face torn off, portraits of people without faces or with their faces wrapped in bandages. Later, he concentrated on painting. His first paintings were abstract art, but throughout the 1960s he made his surrealist inspirations more visible. His early drawings featured sadomasochistic themes.

    Beksiński had no formal training as an artist. His painting were mainly created using oil paint on hardboard panels which he personally prepared, although he also experimented with acrylic paints. He abhorred silence, and always listened to classical music while painting. Despite his love for classical music, Beksinski also appreciated rock music.

    A prestigious exhibition in Warsaw in 1964 proved to be his first major success, as all his paintings were sold. Beksiński threw himself into painting with a passion, and worked constantly (always to the strains of classical music). He soon became the leading figure in contemporary Polish art. In the late 1960s, Beksiński entered what he himself called his "fantastic period", which lasted up to the mid-1980s. This is his best-known period, during which he created very disturbing images, showing a surrealistic, post-apocalyptic environment with very detailed scenes of death, decay, landscapes filled with skeletons, deformed figures and deserts. These paintings were quite detailed, painted with his trademark precision. At the time, Beksiński claimed, "I wish to paint in such a manner as if I were photographing dreams".

    Despite the grim overtones, Beksiński claimed some of his works were misunderstood; in his opinion, they were rather optimistic or even humorous. For the most part, though, Beksiński was adamant that even he did not know the meaning of his artworks and was uninterested in possible interpretations; in keeping with this, he refused to provide titles for any of his drawings or paintings. Before moving to Warsaw in 1977, he burned a selection of his works in his own backyard, without leaving any documentation on them. He later claimed that some of those works were "too personal", while others were unsatisfactory, and he didn't want people to see them.

    The 1980s marked a transitory period for Beksiński. During this time, his works became more popular in France due to the endeavors of Piotr Dmochowski, and he achieved significant popularity in Western Europe, the United States and Japan. His art in the late 1980s and early 1990s focused on monumental or sculpture-like images rendered in a restricted (and often subdued) color palette, including a series of crosses. Paintings in these style, which often appear to have been sketched densely in colored lines, were much less lavish than those known from his "fantastic period", but just as powerful. In 1994, Beksiński explained "I'm going in the direction of a greater simplification of the background, and at the same time a considerable degree of deformation in the figures, which are being painted without what's known as naturalistic light and shadow. What I'm after is for it to be obvious at first sight that this is a painting I made".

    In the latter part of the 1990s, he discovered computers, the Internet, digital photography and photomanipulation, a medium that he focused on until his death. 

    The late 1990s were a very trying time for Beksiński. His wife, Zofia, died in 1998; a year later, on Christmas Eve 1999, his son Tomasz (a popular radio presenter, music journalist and movie translator) committed suicide. Beksiński discovered his son's body. Unable to come to terms with his son's death, he kept an envelope "For Tomek in case I kick the bucket" pinned to his wall.

    On 21 February 2005, Beksiński was found dead in his flat in Warsaw with 17 stab wounds on his body; two of the wounds were determined to have been fatal. Robert Kupiec (the teenage son of his longtime caretaker), who later pleaded guilty, and a friend were arrested shortly after the crime. On 9 November 2006 Robert Kupiec was condemned to 25 years in prison, and his accomplice, Łukasz Kupiec, to 5 years by the court of Warsaw. Before his death, Beksiński refused a loan to Robert Kupiec.

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