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  • #341629

    Anonymous

    Can someone tell me more about burials in Slavic way ?

    #349743

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Can someone tell me more about burials in Slavic way ?

    This is from some website:

    Burial rituals: The early Slavs cremated the dead to help the soul rise up to Heaven, also a reasonable practice when bears and wolves live in the area. The Christian practice of burial can't have been an easy sell, a grave was closer to the Underworld, further from Heaven, and not easy to dig six months of the year because of frozen ground. I would not be surprised to find that for an extended period after the Baptism of the Rus, locals told the priest that a bonfire was needed to thaw the ground for burial, whereupon they cremated the body in secret and buried an empty coffin with the priest in attendance.

    Hell must have been another problem, as fire was sacred to the Slavs, and cold was death. I'm not sure how much of a threat burning in Hell was to most Slavs. It was probably similar to imprisoning a Orthodox monk. Prison would be a general improvement in living conditions for most Orthodox monks, who tended to live in hand-dug caves with barely enough room to crouch in.

        Numerous 16th-18th century diplomats, travellers and historians wrote about consumption of spirits in Russia (Petrey, J. Fletscher, J. Parry, A. Oleari). Early confirmations of the use of alcohol by Slavs are found in Byzantinian and Gothic historians Prisk and Yordan. The Arabian 10th century geographer Ahmed-Ibn-Fadlan describes a Slavic funeral by the Volga river, where drinking takes an important place. The Saxo Grammatic work points to ritual drunkenness of the priest and drink sacrifice to pagan gods.

        The author underlines the importance of vine in Christianity, but also both the church and the folk criticism of drunkenness as devil’s influence. According to ethnographic sources, in funeral rites, a beverage is dedicated to a dead, while live participants abuse alcohol. The custom of drinking together with a demon of illness is also described. Russian hospitality also implies drinking: the first glass is drunk bottoms-up by the head of household. A glass has to be full, because it symbolises home. It is not recommended to leave any remains of a beverage in a glass – it shows lack of good wishes.

        At the end, the author quotes a part of Moskva-Petushki, by Russian writer V. Yerofeyev, showing behaviour of the main character similar to one described by Saxo Grammatic.

    I guess every country had it's own burial traditions which of course were made according to the territory where they lived and other factors. I guess standard ground burial and burning pyre were two standard rituals among Slavs.

    Here is a funeral of one Slavic noble:
    image

    #349744

    Anonymous

    Thank you, but  i still haven't decided how will i be threated after death  ;D

    #349745

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Thank you, but  i still haven't decided how will i be threated after death  ;D

    I think a burning Pyre is the best way, cremation ftw :D That's what Slavs mostly used, burned their dead! Besides i don't like the idea of someone digging my bones out in about 2000 years and playing with them as an archeological revelation…

    #349746

    Anonymous

    Hehe you got a point but i think that slavs did it becouse ground was frozen most part of year  :) . Oh and do you know what they did with ashes of cremated?

    #349747

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Hehe you got a point but i think that slavs did it becouse ground was frozen most part of year  :) . Oh and do you know what they did with ashes of cremated?

    Some of the Slavic people built small burial mounds for the ashes called gromile.
    Remnants of this kind of sacral architecture is nowadays used as a material evidence of Slavic presence across the Balkan in III century CE.

    #349748

    Anonymous

    What about woman who decided to die with their husband on a pyre. Is this true? Anyone knows something about it, some sources?

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