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  • #345909

    Anonymous

    The names of Slavic ethnicities in foreign language can be interesting or unusual.  I will start with the Belarusians and Ukrainians in  languages of the neighbouring countries.

    Belarusians

    Russian – белорусы (belorusy)
    Ukrainian – білоруси (bilorusy)
    Polish – białorusini
    Lithuanian – baltarusiai. Traditional Lithuanian name for Belarusians was 'Gudai'. There're several theories on etymology of the ethnonym. One of which is people whom Lithuanians couldn't understand.
    Latvian – baltkrievi . Krievi is the name given after Krivichi tribe that lived in Pskov and Viciebsk, which are neighbouring regions with eastern Latvia. So, Baltkrievi are Belarusians.

    Ukrainians

    Russian – украинцы (ukraincy)
    Polish – ukraińcy
    Belarusian – ўкраінцы ( ŭkraincy)
    Slovak – ukrajinci
    Romanian – ucraineni
    Moldavian – ucraineni (?)
    Hungarian – ukránok

    #423065

    Anonymous

    Slovenians – Slovenci

    German – die Slowenen
    Italian – Sloveni (?)
    Croatian – Slovenci
    Hungarian – Szlovének

    Nothing interesting from our neighbours, except if you want to see the offensive ones too. Anybody got ay idea why Czechs and Slovakians call us Slovinci? It's interesting as you can find this word in some old Slovene sources aswel.

    #423066

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Anybody got ay idea why Czechs and Slovakians call us Slovinci? It's interesting as you can find this word in some old Slovene sources aswel.

    I would say for the same reason that they say zajic "hare" (proto-slavic zajęk- < zajenk-) and řídit from ręditi (< rend-).

    http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%C5%99%C3%ADdit

    Slovenci ~ Slovęci >> Slovinci

    #423067

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I would say for the same reason that they say zajic "hare" (proto-slavic zajęk- < zajenk-) and řídit from ręditi (< rend-).

    http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%C5%99%C3%ADdit

    Slovenci ~ Slovęci >> Slovinci

    Ja, zat's probably gonna be it. Thanks. :)

    #423068

    Anonymous

    and ręnka – ruka, język – jazyk; slovakia would have been slovinsko as well. so no.

    am not sure about roots of that vowel change, but it may have come from hungarian, where slovenians are szlovének – slovinek.
    or a 19th construction analogous to czech slovan in its purpose.

    #423069

    Anonymous

    Croats-Hrvati
    Germans-Kroaten
    Hungarians-Horvátok
    Turks-Hırvatlar
    Italian-Croati
    Maori-Tarara

    #423070

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    and ręnka – ruka, język – jazyk; slovakia would have been slovinsko as well. so no.

    am not sure about roots of that vowel change, but it may have come from hungarian, where slovenians are szlovének – slovinek.
    or a 19th construction analogous to czech slovan in its purpose.

    Or that … no idea.

    Quote:
    Maori-Tarara

    Lol

    #423071

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Slovenians – Slovenci

    German – die Slowenen
    Italian – Sloveni (?)
    Croatian – Slovenci
    Hungarian – Szlovének

    Nothing interesting from our neighbours, except if you want to see the offensive ones too.

    But as you well know historical names are different. Thow nowdays historical names are sometimes offensive. :D

    Germans – Windisch also Vinden, etc.
    Italian – Schiavonì
    Hungarian – Vendek & Tótok

    1) These terms had either exlusive meaning or broader Slavic meaning, sometimes even both. Depending on time and place. Windisch already started to get quite exclusive meaning at least by cca 16th century in this broader region. So Hieronymus Megiser for example clearly distincts Slovene/Windisch from neibourghing Slavs. Likewise Trubar & other Slovene proties clearly differate when wrriting in German or Latin.

    2) Italians on other hand altho am not sure but i think they were less good with distincting. ;D Since they usually also considered Dalmatian & Istrian Slavs under the term. Basically any Slav under Venetian Rep. was Schiavon. However Benečija or Beneška Slovenija was simply called Schiavonia.

    3) Hungarians now these called us either Vendek or Tótok. Tótok like previous two was initially general term for Slavs but over time got limited to Slovenes and Slovaks. On the other hand Vendek is exclusevly term for Slovene more preciselly Slovenes in historic area Vendvidék (Slovenska krajina) under Kingdom of Hungary. The term is borowing from German Windisch.

    #423072

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    But as you well know historical names are different. Thow nowdays historical names are sometimes offensive. :D

    That's why I didn't mention them.

    #423073

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    and ręnka – ruka, język – jazyk; slovakia would have been slovinsko as well. so no.

    Well, I ve just quoted what I found in David Short's chapter about the Czech language in my book about the "Slavonic Languages".

    [IMG]http://img826.imageshack.us/img826/4121/3lzg.png” />

    #423074

    Anonymous

    Slovinci was a term that was used by Štokavian speakers for Slav but also more specifically Slavonian. Cca up towards end 17th century it gradually went defunct. Posibly west Slavs took that term from this and applied it to us?

    #423075

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Well, I ve just quoted what I found in David Short's chapter about the Czech language in my book about the "Slavonic Languages".

    [IMG]http://img826.imageshack.us/img826/4121/3lzg.png” />

    Uufff improvement … actually it is a subject covered in 3 pages … here we are:

    [IMG]http://img22.imageshack.us/img22/8592/vlqr.png” />

    #423076

    Anonymous

    Here I put not only neighboring countries but also the countries and some Russian republics where the name may seems unusual:

    Ukrainian  росiяни/rosijani
    Belarusian  рускiя/ruskija
    Hungarian . orosz,
    Kazakhstanian. орыс/orys
    Tatar. урыс/урус/urys/urus
    Finnish  venäläiset  from *ventitji (vyatichi -tribe) or from venedy
    Estonian  venelased
    Latvian  krievi
    Lithuanian  kriẽvai
    Chechen  оьрси(-йн)/oirsi(in)
    Azerbaijani rus
    Turkish rus

    #423077

    Anonymous

    Armenian people call Poles ''Lehatsi''.

    #423078

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Armenian people call Poles ''Lehatsi''.

    I believe all the Middle Eastern Leh– names came from Turkish Lehistan (AFAIK an old-fashioned name now), and that (the first part) would be from Ruthenian I think.

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