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  • #344884

    Anonymous

    I was searching for this topic. Didn't find. So posting.

    My favourite are:
    Szukać/šukať. While szukać in means "to searching for", šukať means in Slovak "to f*ck". Whenever on Polish Wikipedia I see "szukaj", I immideatly start to laugh :D No matter how many times I saw it.
    Zachód/záchod. In Polish (and Russian and Slovenian) it means "west", but in Czech and Slovak it's "toilet".
    Vytopit/vytopiť. In Czech it means "to heat", but in Slovak it's something like "to make a deluge". X3
    Otrok/otrok. In English you would translate Slovenian otrok as "child". In Slovak you would translate it as "slave".
    Dunaj/Dunaj. In Slovak Danube, in Slovenian Vienna.
    Jed/jed. In Slovenian it's "food" and in Slovak "poison". This misunderstanding would have fatal outcomes XD

    Wikipedia – False Friends of the Slavist

    #407153

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Dunaj/Dunaj. In Slovak Danube, in Slovenian Vienna.
    Jed/jed. In Slovenian it's "food" and in Slovak "poison". This misunderstanding would have fatal outcomes XD

    Tatra Slovenes tend to be akward from time to time. For example they think otrok (child) is a slave. What an evil people (and Czech's too)! Czech's are also with no respect for družina (family) either. Instead they degraded family for military purposess; http://cs.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C4%8Cesk%C3%A1_dru%C5%BEina

    On other hand they consider their kids chlapci. How dare they degrade kids into hlapci (serf's)!

    #407154

    Anonymous

    droga (polish) = road, way
    droga (serbian) = drugs

    These could make interesting situations too when asking for directions xD

    #407155

    Anonymous
    Quote:

    Jed/jed. In Slovenian it's "food" and in Slovak "poison". This misunderstanding would have fatal outcomes XD

    It's quite interesting. In Russian jeda is food, and jad is poison. I checked up etymological dictionary and found out that both these words supposedly originate from Pra-Slavic word ѣдъ, so it explains possible interpretation differences in Slavic languages.

    Thank you for starting this topic!

    #407156

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    It's quite interesting. In Russian jeda is food, and jad is poison. I checked up etymological dictionary and found out that both these words supposedly originate from Pra-Slavic word ѣдъ, so it explains possible interpretation differences in Slavic languages.

    Thank you for starting this topic!

    Jad in Serbian is sorrow,woe.

    I will also add : 

    ponos; Serbian: pride ; Russian : diarrhea

    proliv; Serbian: diarrhea ; Russian: it is strait, channel

    život ;  Serbian: life ; Russian: stomach

    vrag;  Serbian: the devil Russian: the enemy

    #407157

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    ponos; Serbian: pride ; Russian : diarrhea

    Now we know how much pride is worth. ;D

    Quote:
    život ;  Serbian: life ; Russian: stomach

    Let me add Slovene meaning; trunk, torso, body and in some dialects same as in Serbian.

    Quote:
    vrag;  Serbian: the devil Russian: the enemy

    Here it is both + bad person.

    #407158

    Anonymous

    This one is well known for all the Russians been to Czechia. It can be seen at public transport.

    Pozor! Policie varuje! – in Russian means "Shame! Police steals!"

    Everyone is surprised with such honesty, then comes smth like "Well done Czechs, conscious people, publicly condemning corruption!".  :)

    But actually the meaning is "Attention! Police warning!"

    #407159

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Jad in Serbian is sorrow,woe.

    I thing the root is the same – something which is poisoning you from inside.

    Quote:
    život ;  Serbian: life ; Russian: stomach

    život sometimes is used to denote life in Russian too, but it is an obsolete rule and nowadays is used only to emphasize the speaker's solemn intent. But in old sources we can find it ubiquitously. So, in Vladimir Monomakh's Instructions we can find a call to defend the Motherland "ne žaleja života svoego, ne ščadja golovy svoeja".

    #407160

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Tatra Slovenes tend to be akward from time to time. For example they think otrok (child) is a slave. What an evil people (and Czech's too)! Czech's are also with no respect for družina (family) either. Instead they degraded family for military purposess.

    On other hand they consider their kids chlapci. How dare they degrade kids into hlapci (serf's)!

    In Slovak, "družina" is (outdated) word for group of people/friends. For example groups of outlaws used to be called "družiny". However "družba" means
    groomsman XD

    Quote:
    Pozor! Policie varuje! – in Russian means "Shame! Police steals!"
    But actually the meaning is "Attention! Police warning!"

    This made me laugh so hard :D

    #407161

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    ponos; Serbian: pride ; Russian : diarrhea
    proliv; Serbian: diarrhea ; Russian: it is strait, channel

    In Slovak is diarrhea hnačka and in Czech průjem :)

    #407162

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Pozor!

    'Pozór' in Polish means appearance, eg. dla pozoru – for the sake of appearances, na pozór, z pozoru – seemingly

    Policie varuje!

    This is quite confusing from Polish point of view, because besides the meaning 'to keep guard' we also use 'warować' as 'to lie down'. This is what dog does when we command him: 'Waruj!'  :D

    [img width=540 height=700]http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ls_tB4SD8Hw/TvNOoc2Qp9I/AAAAAAAAACs/Ky37kVVTc7M/s1600/etna-waruj-23-11.jpg” />

    The whole translation will be: Seemingly police lies down 

    #407163

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    (…) diarrhea (…) in Czech průjem :)

    Haha, one of the meaning of pruć in Polish is shoot really, really fast :D

    I won't mention here Slovak or Czech false friends with Polish (the list would be veeery long), but in Russian (I hope there're correct):

    ja zažygał sviet ("I've turned the light on") – never say that to a Pole, he would think that you've vomited all over the world :P
    Similar with užinat' ("dine"), in Polish urzynać means "to cut", and when no thing to cut is specified, I think that's about throats :)

    Quote:
    'Pozór' in Polish means appearance, eg. dla pozoru – for the sake of appearances, na pozór, z pozoru – seemingly
    This is quite confusing from Polish point of view, because besides the meaning 'to keep guard' we also use 'warować' as 'to lie down'. This is what dog does when we command him: 'Waruj!'  :D

    The whole translation will be: Seemingly police lies down  ;D

    Funny, I never thought that's about lying down, I rather understand it as "forbid" or "close". Yes, I know that this is a command for a dog, but still my brain refuses to make a connection.

    The command "waruj" actually also means "guard!". But the connection between Police and dogs is also funny, because in Polish one of offensive word for Police is psy ("dogs").

    Pozór in Silesian means the same as in Czech, "dej pozór" = "be aware"; here's an example (should be "we aucie" but it isn't a significant error):

    image

    #407164

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    The command "waruj" actually also means "guard!". But the connection between Police and dogs is also funny, because in Polish one of offensive word for Police is psy ("dogs").

    Yes, the association of words 'Police' and 'waruje' makes that you imagine yourself a guarding dog  ;)

    #407165

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    But the connection between Police and dogs is also funny, because in Polish one of offensive word for Police is psy ("dogs").

    They have similar "nickname" here as well , they are called kerovi, which is the same as psi.

    #407166

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    ja zažygał sviet ("I've turned the light on") – never say that to a Pole, he would think that you've vomited all over the world

    And Slovene would think you were burning all world. :D

    Quote:
    Pozor! Policie varuje! – in Russian means "Shame! Police steals!"

    Here it means; Warning! Police protects (defends)!

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