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  • #345914

    Anonymous
    [img width=700 height=476]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/82/2009dzi003.jpg/800px-2009dzi003.jpg”/>

    [size=12pt]Dziady[/size] was an ancient Slavic feast to commemorate the dead. Literally, the word is translated as "Grandfathers". It was held twice every year (in the spring and autumn). During the feast the ancient Slavs organized libations and ritual meals. In local mythologies such feasts were organized both for the living and for the souls of the forefathers who joined the dziady after dark.

    image

    In Poland, the tradition prevailed in the form of Christian Zaduszki feast.[1]

    In Belarus, Dziady (Дзяды) were usually held on the last Saturday before St. Dmitry's day, end of October/beginning of November (Dźmitreuskija dziady, St.Dmitry's Dziady). There were also 'Trinity Day Dziady, 'Shrovetide Dziady, and some other dates.

    [img width=700 height=476]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/76/ObiataRKP.jpg/800px-ObiataRKP.jpg”/>

    Lithuanians also have similar feast day, called Ilgės. It has roots in pagan times, and differs slightly from the Slavic Dziady.

    [img width=466 height=700]http://bialczynski.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/dziady8.jpg?w=681&h=1024″/>

    Since 1988 the Belarusian Popular Front initiated the revival of the tradition in Belarus. In addition, this day a rally to Kurapaty is arranged, in the memory of the victims of Soviet political repressions. The initiative was met with strong opposition from the communist administration of the country. The tradition is still continued by the BPF and other movements in Belarus.[2][3]

    The second part of the poetical novel Dziady by Adam Mickiewicz is dedicated mostly to the Dziady feast organized in what is now Belarus, and popular among Ruthenians and Lithuanians during the times of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

    How is Halloween both today celebrated and traditionally in your country?

    #423160

    Anonymous

    Ton of candy and remembering when i used to go out and party.  Now, im digging through matthew's candy to get rid of the stuff c with nuts.  We set up three jack o lanterns in v the fireplace  to represent  our family,.

    image

    image

    #423161

    Anonymous

    Interesting post on the ancient tradition, Pentaz.  :) I couldn't find anything like that for Ukraine.

    Currently, Halloween is banned in Siberia and discouraged in Russia, it seems. I'm not sure if Halloween is celebrated in any significant way in Ukraine, outside of Kyiv, maybe? In America, it has become an excuse for college girls to dress slutty.  ::)  I enjoy seeing the little ones dressed up in cute costumes, but otherwise not much into this celebration.  :)

    Nyet on Halloween: Russian church warns of ‘dangers’; Siberia bans holiday

    By Marc Bennetts – Special to The Washington Times
    Wednesday, October 30, 2013

    MOSCOW — Russia’s Orthodox Church this week warned of the spiritual dangers of Halloween, as authorities in Siberia banned the holiday for encouraging “extremist” tendencies in young people.

    “Halloween is a serious danger. When you play with dark forces, they always win,” said Russian Orthodox Church spokesman Vsevolod Chaplin, adding that the consequences of marking the ancient holiday could be “illnesses, suffering and a feeling of emptiness.”

    His comments came as the Ministry of Education in Siberia’s Omsk region placed a blanket ban on Halloween celebrations in schools, saying the holiday promotes an “extremist mood” among teenagers. The ministry also said Halloween is “propaganda of the cult of death.”

    Russians began — unofficially — celebrating Halloween after the collapse of the Soviet Union, as once taboo Western culture flooded into the country. But the authorities here remain suspicious of Western ideas and traditions. Regional authorities previously banned celebrations of Valentine's Day.

    Both holidays are, however, increasingly popular with ordinary Russians, and Halloween-themed parties are common in big cities like Moscow.

    The Halloween warnings come as President Vladimir Putin increasingly has turned toward Russia’s conservative masses for support in response to last year’s protests that challenged his long rule.

    “Many countries of the Euro-Atlantic alliance have denied their roots, including Christian values,” Mr. Putin said earlier this month in a keynote speech.

    “Families with many children are placed on the same level as same-sex partnerships, and belief in God on the same level as a belief in Satan,” he said.

    Halloween celebrations also have proven controversial in other former Soviet states.

    Police in Tajikistan detained two dozen participants in a Halloween celebration earlier this week, in part of a crackdown on the holiday, the BBC’s Russian language service reported.

    Detainees were questioned by police and lectured on spiritual and traditional values before being released, the BBC reported.

    #423162

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Interesting post on the ancient tradition, Pentaz.  :) I couldn't find anything like that for Ukraine.

    Currently, Halloween is banned in Siberia and discouraged in Russia, it seems. I'm not sure if Halloween is celebrated in any significant way in Ukraine, outside of Kyiv, maybe? In America, it has become an excuse for college girls to dress slutty.  ::)  I enjoy seeing the little ones dressed up in cute costumes, but otherwise not much into this celebration.  :)

    The festive Dzyady  is  not celebrated in Ukraine to the same extent as in Belarus in present time. It's also not celebrated in Russia.There 're more people in Ukraine and Russia celebrating American Halloween than Dzyady (Дiди in Ukrainian, Деды in Russian). The celebration of American Halloween  by young people has nothing to do with commemorating the dead in Ukraine and Russa.

    Also, Ukrainians, Russians and Belarusians commemorate their dead around Easter time. Dzyady is a popular festive in Belarus, possibly in the regions neighbouring Belarus, in which archaic elements have been preserved by people.

    @Pentaz

    Thanks for the topic.

    #423163

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    The festive Dzyady  is  not celebrated in Ukraine to the same extent as in Belarus in present time. It's also not celebrated in Russia.There 're more people in Ukraine and Russia celebrating American Halloween than Dzyady (Дiди in Ukrainian, Деды in Russian). The celebration of American Halloween  by young people has nothing to do with commemorating the dead in Ukraine and Russa.

    Also, Ukrainians, Russians and Belarusians commemorate their dead around Easter time. Dzyady is a popular festive in Belarus, possibly in the regions neighbouring Belarus, in which archaic elements have been preserved by people.

    @Pentaz

    Thanks for the topic.

    Thank you for the additional clarification on the Dzyady feast, Sviatogor. I appreciate it.  :) Ancient Slavic traditions are fascinating to me.  I think I'd prefer everyone celebrating a feast honoring our departed ancestors, rather than a commercialized American holiday. Halloween where I live has become a weird mixture of drunken parties, and greedy little bastards wanting massive amounts of candy. "Damn, she didn't give us much, did she? Go back and ask for more!" *Heard this earlier tonight at my house!* >:(

    #423164

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Thank you for the additional clarification on the Dzyady feast, Sviatogor. I appreciate it.  :) Ancient Slavic traditions are fascinating to me.  I think I'd prefer everyone celebrating a feast honoring our departed ancestors, rather than a commercialized American holiday. Halloween where I live has become a weird mixture of drunken parties, and greedy little bastards wanting massive amounts of candy. "Damn, she didn't give us much, did she? Go back and ask for more!" *Heard this earlier tonight at my house!* >:(

    You're welcome! :)

    #423165

    Anonymous

    Have seen plenty of pumpkins last night. That's mostly as far as people here go. And some go masked to parties (city folk), otherwise noone cares about Halloween. Perhaps because that day is an actual holiday in Slovenia – Reformation Day (dan reformacije), the only "protestant" holiday. But noone cares about that either …

    And today's All Saints day, another holiday.

    #423166

    Anonymous
    #423167

    Anonymous
    #423168

    Anonymous

    Message from Polish poet Adam Mickiewicz, author of poetic drama Dziady (Forfathers' Eve)  :D

    [img width=460 height=700]http://www.slowianskawiara.pl/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/dziady.jpg” />

    #423169

    Anonymous

    [img width=495 height=700]http://www.slowianskawiara.pl/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/Dziady.jpg” />

    Do you know that:

    Dziady ritual described by Mickiewicz was originally a pagan festival, during which the pre-Christian Slavs worshiped the memory of their dead feasting by their graves and leaving them food.

    Zaduszki (All Souls' Day, November 2nd) is the Catholic name for Dziady – Christians, unable to eradicate pagan custom transformed it into their holiday.

    Halloween comes from "All Hallows' Eve" and is completely strange to Polish culture, it is a commercial response to the Celtic festival of Samhaim (the equivalent of our Dziady), amending solemn celebration into infantile dressing up festiwal!

    Respect your tradition!

    Association for the Tradition and Culture "NIKLOT"

    #423170

    Anonymous

    I tried to bring some importance to yesterday by memorizing Claudia and my departed relatives.  After Matt went to sleep, we light a fire in the fireplace and set out a plate of food in honor of them, also poured some beer on the ground.  We said a prayer and said why we missed them and what we loved about them.  I wish Matthew had a chance to meet and spend time with them.  I'm sure they would have spoiled him and stuffed him with lots of home baked goodies. 

    Matthew had a school party after school and I was not impressed at the greediness of some of the kids from the 8-11  year old age group.  They were very pushy and greedy, and to top it off, this town is a well off community.  None of those kids have to worry about having enough food.  We didn't let Matt get overboard with the candy grubbing, he had enough and don't want him to be an ungrateful little kid like some of the others that were there.  Glad for this post because it shows that holidays are not about overpriced Chinese made junk, but about our families, heritage and history.  What are we if we don't have that? 

    #423171

    Anonymous

    Dziady ritual, Poland

    Dziady 2007

    #423172

    Anonymous

    Яўген Барышнікаў-Дзяды

    Дзяды

    Сёньня ў выраі ні душы.
    Сёньня ў выраі — пуста.
    Дзень адчыненых вокнаў, сустрэч, успамінаў — пакуль не прыйшлі халады.
    Усё гатова: гарэлка, грыбы, хлеб пакроены дбайна на лусты,
    У лазьні — венік і чысты ручнік.
    Усё гатова,
    Дзяды.

    Прамаўляю імёны ў туман.
    Пахне паленым лісьцем адранку.
    Пэўна гэта з-за дыму ў куточку вачэй дрыжыць кропля салёнай вады.
    Ды як вейкі расплюшчаных вокнаў, скалынуцца ледзь бачна фіранкі.
    Дзякуй вам, што прышлі.
    Прывітаньне,
    Дзяды.

    Моўчкі сядзем за стол. Што казаць?
    Пра мяне вам напэўна ж вядома:
    Сумняюся, гадую, раблю… Карацей, як жывы.
    Вось сам я, вось сям’я, тое месца, што клічу я домам.
    Але ўсё гэта бачна адтуль… Раскажыце-ка лепей як вы?
    Ці пачулі вы словы мае, не сказаныя своечасова?
    (Яны комам дагэтуль стаяць— не запіць гэту горыч нічым.)
    Хай дрыготкі агеньчык сьвячы стане вашаю сёньняшняй мовай:
    Пагамонім пра ўсё, аб усім памаўчым.

    За сямейным сталом прасядзім дацямна, як бывала калісьці.
    Балазе пільных справаў на заўтра нарэшце няма.
    А на вейкі расплюшчаных вокнаў ападае апошняе лісьце,
    Тоне сьпеў журавоў у імжы. Неўзабаве зіма.

    Зорным пылам птушыных шляхоў, галашэньнямі ветру
    Ляжа белы абрус забыцьця, прыцярушыць сьляды.
    Застанецца жыць рэхам імя ў гулкай памяці нетрах.
    І спадзёў, што ўзгадаюць яго на Дзяды.

    Што ня згіне, ня ссохне мой дуб побач з каменем шэрым,
    Разрасьцецца гальлё, прарастуць жалуды між травы…
    Нехта з тварам падобным на мой зноў пакліча сваіх на вячэру,
    А пасьля, не прыбраўшы стала, адыдзе ў сьвет жывых…

    За вакном тлее горад агнёў  — зараз рана цямнее.
    Прамільгне ў небе зьнічка, пазбавіць кагосьці пакут.
    Выбачайце, ня ведаю усіх. Памінаю і то як умею…
    Хаця мо ад самоты трызьню? Мо нікога й нямашака тут?…

    Раптам ў чорнае бездані шкла я за сьпінаю постаці ўбачу,
    На імгненьне сустрэнемся позіркамі праз гады…
    Нехта з тварам, падобным на мой, згасіць сьвечку й прашэпча, удзячны:
    — Дзякуй вам, што былі.
    Да сустрэчы,
    Дзяды.

    #423173

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    [Яўген Барышнікаў-Дзяды]

    Oh. Wow. This made me cry. Such a beautiful song! Thank you for the lyrics so much. Very timely song for me. I go to the Orthodox cemetery on Sunday to visit my ancestors' graves, as we do at this time of year. This song will be with me there. Thank you for posting this.  :)

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