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  • #345690

    Anonymous

    Hello, from some time I am playing a game called Smite. It is a MOBA (Multiplayer Online Battle Arena) game, where gods of different pantheons are fighting against each other. As of this moment in the game they are the Greek, Roman, Egyptian, Norse, Hindu, Chinese and Mayan pantheons. I would like to introduce the Slavic pantheon into the game.
    While some might argue that mythology in a game can be harmful for the mythology as it would give a distorted version of it, I disagree, for me the gods in the game only increased my intrest for learning about different cultures and mythologies. I think introducing Slavic gods into the games would increase the intrest towards the Slavic mythology for a lot of people playing the game.

    So far I made a god concept of Morana (Marzanna). You can view it here: http://smite.boards.net/thread/172/morana-goddess-death-working-title (I made the thread before learning about this forum). Mostly "lore-wise" I relied on personal research (mostly Wikipedia, where info about the slavic pantheon is very little), artwork and a personal view of what she would be in a combat oriented game.
    The main reason behind her "kit" is that after a long and tiresome battle with the winter's cold, Morana "rewards" the poor sod she is fighting with a quick and silent death. Her weapon represents her connection with harvest (and the naming of her skills).

    I am not exactly sure if the information I am representing is entrirely correct, so I would like some help for future god concept (I have ones coming for Perun, Svarog and Veles). I would like for opinions on how their "kit" would fit their lore, their symbols and how they can be different from gods of other pantheons (for example between Perun and Thor from the Norse mythology). I think the Slavic pantheon in Smite would bring many people who are interested in the Slavic culture, however I don't want to give too much false information (even if they are lore experts present in the development of each god).

    P.S. If you are into that kind of games, feel free to register here!

    #420669

    Anonymous

    Even thought we don't let people with 1 post to advertise we'll let this thread live as i checked out your game and it has great potential and good idea. So i hope our members can help you as much as possible. I can suggest you to download our eBook as well (only 1 symbolic euro) for aditional both graphical and story wise inspiration for your game and characters (including Morana) as i'm a big mythology fan and i have alreday made the comic-game-like designs of the characters in it. :) 

    We have a good bunch here so i'm sure you'll get a lot of help buddy. Also if you will later need some advertising for your game when Slavic pantheon is released we'll sort it out!

    Just bump as much as you want!

    Also i have the same mindset as you when it comes to the fact that games are good to spread the mythologies throught games, i guess that can be seen throught the design of Slavorum itself and game-comic front page

    #420670

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Even thought we don't let people with 1 post to advertise we'll let this thread live as i checked out your game and it has great potential and good idea. So i hope our members can help you as much as possible. I can suggest you to download our eBook as well (only 1 symbolic euro) for aditional both graphical and story wise inspiration for your game and characters (including Morana) as i'm a big mythology fan and i have alreday made the comic-game-like designs of the characters in it. :) 

    We have a good bunch here so i'm sure you'll get a lot of help buddy. Also if you will later need some advertising for your game when Slavic pantheon is released we'll sort it out!

    Just bump as much as you want!

    Also i have the same mindset as you when it comes to the fact that games are good to spread the mythologies throught games, i guess that can be seen throught the design of Slavorum itself and game-comic front page

    Thanks for the feedback, I appreciate it. Would like to buy the eBook. I also rly like the style of the home page :)

    #420671

    Anonymous

    The wiki articles on Perun and Veles are rather good in their current stance, in fact any info beyond that you could find will most likely be inaccurate. A few notes on the articles themselves:

    1. "Like Germanic Thor,[citation needed] Perun is described as a rugged man with a copper beard. He rides in a chariot pulled by a goat buck and carries a mighty axe, or sometimes a hammer. The axe is hurled at evil people and spirits and will always return to his hand." – This is an extrapolation of the image of Thor on Slavic ground. There are no goats mentioned in any source. Perun (or, to be as accurate as possible, his Orthodox Christian substitute Prophet Elijah) is described as riding in a fiery/copper/iron chariot during thunderstorms across the sky in Belarusian, Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian and Serbian folklore accounts; animals that pull that chariot are usually not mentioned, but when they are, it's always horses. He throws arrows (bow is not mentioned in any original folkloric source known to me, but, of course, it's implied by the arrows) or axes made of stone, fire, or copper (thunderbolts), and they are later found deep in the ground (belemnite fossils and neolithic axes and arrow/spear heads); in many places there is a belief they slowly move back to the surface of the ground – this may take fourty days, three, seven etc. years, which can be interpreted as an implication they indeed try to return to his hand.
    As for the beard – there is one isolated Belarusian folklore account that mentions Perun has black hair and grey beard (= colours of stormclouds), but I can't remember the source and I can't say if it's relaible. Other than that, Rus' Primary Chronicle mentions that Perun's idol in Kiev had "silver head and golden moustache". Definitely no copper beard anywhere.

    2. The article for Veles has some etymological inaccuracies (the relation with the name of certain priests/sorcerers especially), I won't dwell on that since it's somewhat irrelevant to your needs; what might be relevant is that there is no proof he was related to priests and such other than pure (although very plausible, since he seems to be rather engaged in sacral affairs) speculation, however, he was quite possibly related to singers and music.

    3. Keep in mind that the whole myth about Perun&Veles struggle for cattle, women etc. is a reconstruction (highly probable, but still a reconstruction) based on comparison with other Indo-European traditions and late Slavic folklore accounts. We have no accounts of Slavic myths at all; the lower mythology (everything about household and nature spirits, vampires, werewolves, fairies etc.) was excellently preserved in Slavic folklore until recent times, but higher mythology, dealing with the deeds of gods, was lost after Christianisation and only a few possible remnants, on the base of which the said reconstruction was made, exist.

    Other than that, there are no significant misconceptions in those two articles, and you can use them as a reference.

    A few words about Morana: from the existing ethnographic material we can conclude that there was a highly revered female mythological entity with a name derived from *Mar-/*Mor-, however, whether she had the status of a proper goddess or not is unknown, she is not mentioned in any of the old sources and her functions are very obscure – her conection with death and winter is the most problematic, actually; also, there is a lot of contamination with Virgin Mary in folklore. But this is a very long discussion that is a bit superfluous here, I think you can use her current "profile" you already have, since it's consistent with the popular image of Morana amongst Slavs nowadays.

    Hope all of that is helpful somehow.  :)

    #420672

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    The wiki articles on Perun and Veles are rather good in their current stance, in fact any info beyond that you could find will most likely be inaccurate. A few notes on the articles themselves:

    1. "Like Germanic Thor,[citation needed] Perun is described as a rugged man with a copper beard. He rides in a chariot pulled by a goat buck and carries a mighty axe, or sometimes a hammer. The axe is hurled at evil people and spirits and will always return to his hand." – This is an extrapolation of the image of Thor on Slavic ground. There are no goats mentioned in any source. Perun (or, to be as accurate as possible, his Orthodox Christian substitute Prophet Elijah) is described as riding in a fiery/copper/iron chariot during thunderstorms across the sky in Belarusian, Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian and Serbian folklore accounts; animals that pull that chariot are usually not mentioned, but when they are, it's always horses. He throws arrows (bow is not mentioned in any original folkloric source known to me, but, of course, it's implied by the arrows) or axes made of stone, fire, or copper (thunderbolts), and they are later found deep in the ground (belemnite fossils and neolithic axes and arrow/spear heads); in many places there is a belief they slowly move back to the surface of the ground – this may take fourty days, three, seven etc. years, which can be interpreted as an implication they indeed try to return to his hand.
    As for the beard – there is one isolated Belarusian folklore account that mentions Perun has black hair and grey beard (= colours of stormclouds), but I can't remember the source and I can't say if it's relaible. Other than that, Rus' Primary Chronicle mentions that Perun's idol in Kiev had "silver head and golden moustache". Definitely no copper beard anywhere.

    2. The article for Veles has some etymological inaccuracies (the relation with the name of certain priests/sorcerers especially), I won't dwell on that since it's somewhat irrelevant to your needs; what might be relevant is that there is no proof he was related to priests and such other than pure (although very plausible, since he seems to be rather engaged in sacral affairs) speculation, however, he was quite possibly related to singers and music.

    3. Keep in mind that the whole myth about Perun&Veles struggle for cattle, women etc. is a reconstruction (highly probable, but still a reconstruction) based on comparison with other Indo-European traditions and late Slavic folklore accounts. We have no accounts of Slavic myths at all; the lower mythology (everything about household and nature spirits, vampires, werewolves, fairies etc.) was excellently preserved in Slavic folklore until recent times, but higher mythology, dealing with the deeds of gods, was lost after Christianisation and only a few possible remnants, on the base of which the said reconstruction was made, exist.

    Other than that, there are no significant misconceptions in those two articles, and you can use them as a reference.

    A few words about Morana: from the existing ethnographic material we can conclude that there was a highly revered female mythological entity with a name derived from *Mar-/*Mor-, however, whether she had the status of a proper goddess or not is unknown, she is not mentioned in any of the old sources and her functions are very obscure – her conection with death and winter is the most problematic, actually; also, there is a lot of contamination with Virgin Mary in folklore. But this is a very long discussion that is a bit superfluous here, I think you can use her current "profile" you already have, since it's consistent with the popular image of Morana amongst Slavs nowadays.

    Hope all of that is helpful somehow.  :)

    Thanks for the info! The game is strongly pagan focused, it is already confirmed there will be no content released under the interpretation of abrahamic religions. It is unfortunate that most of the lore about gods from both the Slavic and Celtic paganism ware lost during christinisation  (any many other pagan religions that ware lost entirely).
    For that reason I guess it would be alright to make the god concepts upon my interpretation on what I can find on Wikipedia or other, more resourceful sources and perhaps some artworks.

    #420673

    Anonymous

    Hmm, I didn't notice you were a compatriot.
    In case you live in the country, you can try to find, or order this book, it is very good and scientifically reliable. If you live in Sofia: I know for sure it's available at both the National Library and SU's Faculty of Slavonic linguistics' library (or at least it was available couple of years ago).

    #420674

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Hmm, I didn't notice you were a compatriot.
    In case you live in the country, you can try to find, or order this book, it is very good and scientifically reliable. If you live in Sofia: I know for sure it's available at both the National Library and SU's Faculty of Slavonic linguistics' library (or at least it was available couple of years ago).

    I live in Plovdiv a bit far from Sofia, but I may look out for it. Fairly sure it can be found in Plovdiv too. Thanks!

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