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  • #349842

    Anonymous

    I totaly agree with you Wilkolak and thanks for your post it was very informative

    #349843

    Anonymous

    One of the most popular Slavic symbols

    Kolovrat or kolowrat (also Colovrat, sometimes anglicized as Collowrath) means spinning wheel in a number of Slavic languages (contemporary or archaic meaning): "kolo" means "wheel", "vrat" is the stem for "turning/spinning/etc." It may also be an archaic form of the East Slavic word kolovorot for "brace". Kolo symbolizes the Sun. The word may also refer to one of the following.

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    Коловра́т (от старосл. коло — колесо, круг, и врат — ворот, то есть букв. «вращение колеса», «круговорот») — символ, используемый частью современных русских националистов и неоязычников («родноверов»). По их утверждениям, является исконно русским названием для свастики как солярного символа, хотя не известно ни одного исторического источника, где свастику (имевшую на Руси множество имен) называли бы «коловратом». Наиболее ранним появлением данного символа считается гравюра польского художника Станислава Якубовского 1923 года. В русском языке было слово «коловратный», книжного происхождения — «вращающийся», также «изменчивый, ненадежный»; отсюда коловорот — ручной инструмент для сверления и коловратки (лат. Rotifera) — тип животных, напоминающих червей. Символ также известен как «Солнцеворот».

    http://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%9A%D0%BE%D0%BB%D0%BE%D0%B2%D1%80%D0%B0%D1%82

    #349844

    Anonymous

    image

    This simbol you can see in Russian movie Alexander Nevsky from 1938. What is interesting it is that Teutonic Knights are the ones who have it not Russians. I actualy wonder if this symbol is realy historical or was just adopted from the movie. :D

    #349845

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    image
    This simbol you can see in Russian movie Alexander Nevsky from 1938. What is interesting it is that Teutonic Knights are the ones who have it not Russians. I actualy wonder if this symbol is realy historical or was just adopted from the movie. :D

    "The symbol known as the "Hands of God"  discovered in 1936 at the archaeological site in the Bialey in Lodz region, dating to the III-IV century AD (Przeworsk culture). During World War II vessel is due to the presence of the swastika was used by the Nazis for propaganda purposes. His image reproduced in many copies of posters, postcards and newspapers, and two-arm swastika became the emblem of the occupied city. Vessel was lost during the withdrawal of the Germans from Lodz and to this day is known only by the gypsum copy[1]."
    http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/R%C4%99ce_Boga#cite_note-0

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    #349846

    Anonymous

    Thanks for info Dervan. Realy interesting. Its funny that one of the Teutonic Knights has this kind of symbol in Aleksander Nevsky movie. :D Anyway just for fun i wonder what you think;

    I dont get it why swastikas represent sun? I mean they could use symbols that look more sun like. For example something like this;

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    #349847

    Anonymous

    As far I know swastika represents moving sun on sky (think it's most logical), so people probably try to engrave sun symbol simple as can be (evolution of writing, from pictograms, ideograms to alphabet).

    "Another hypothesis is that the 4 arms of the cross represent 4 aspects of nature – the sun, wind, water, soil. Some have said the 4 arms of cross are four seasons, where the division for 90-degree sections correspond to the solstices and equinoxes.The Hindus represent it as the Universe in our own spiral galaxy in the fore finger of Lord Vishnu."
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swastika

    #349848

    Anonymous

    The symbols below are self-explantory. :)

    Pans for the baking of “Pogača”, Pag Island (Croatia), XIX century

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    #349849

    Anonymous
    Wilkolak wrote:
    In Slavic countries first Swastika found is more of 6000 years old!!!

    The swastika is probably even older than that. What is interesting is that the Balto-Slavic peoples kept the ancient Indo-European tribal symbols for a much longer time than any other European peoples did.

    An example of Polish medieval heraldry:

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/ea/POL_COA_Boreyko.svg/596px-POL_COA_Boreyko.svg.png

    #349850

    Anonymous

    Slavic symbols – sculptures. The pieces are replicas found in Croatia and ancient Rus’.

    Cross, Croatia 9-11 th centuries

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    Dragon, Croatia, 9-11 th centuries, The museum of Croatian archaeological monuments in Split

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    Pentagram, Relief from the Church of St. Peter and Moses in Solin, Croatia , 9-11 th centuries

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    Birds, 7-8 th century, The museum of Croatian archaeological monuments in Split

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    Крест из Брестья, 9-11 th centuries, The museum of Croatian archaeological monuments in Split

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    Stella. Risen man. 12-15 th centuries. Stella from Bogomil church in Croatia

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    Cross, 9 th century, The museum of Croatian archaeological monuments in Split

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    Lark, ancient Rus’

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    Zbruch idol, 10 th century, Ancient Rus’, Krakow archaeological museum.

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    Fibula, ancient Rus’, banks of middle Dnieper, 6 th century. Kiev state museum of history.

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    Dragon from Novgorod, ancient Rus’, 6-8 th centuries.

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    Vasilisk, Leo and Semargl, ancient Rus’, 12 th century, Dmitrivsky cathedral in Vladimir

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    Rusalki (Вилы-Русалки на Колтах) , ancient Rus’ 11-12 th centuries. The Hermitage, St. Petersburg

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    Semargl. Ancient Rus’ 12 th century. Borisoglebsky cathedral in Chernihiv.

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    Eagle-Falcon,  Ancient Rus’ 12 th century. Borisoglebsky cathedral in Chernihiv.

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    Griffin from the gates of Suzdal, Ancient Rus’ 13 the century, southern gates of Nativity cathedral in Suzdal

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    Sirin bird, ancient Rus’ 12 – 13 th century. Kiev state museum of history

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    Griffin, ancient Rus’ 12 th century. Church of the Intercession in Bogolyubovo.

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    Firebird, the beginning of 20 th century, Smolensk state museum

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    #349851

    Anonymous
    #349853

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I recommend a book:"Viking and Slavic ornamental design vol. 2"

    Thanks!

    I have a book written by a Russian author. They symbols the author discusses are mostly found in eastern Slavia. There are few from other Slavic countries too. The book is only an introduction. Many interesting symbols found on various objects, ornaments and folk art are omitted in the book This is the book http://www.ozon.ru/context/detail/id/4767657/
    which can be found on the Internet. I don’t know how much the author knows about the subject too. 

    #349854

    Anonymous

    If people know quality literature (in any Slavic language) on Slavic symbolism, please share it. :)

    #349855

    Anonymous

    About pagan symbols in St. Mikołaj cult

    #349856

    Anonymous

    image

    Artur Kowalik, "Kosmologia dawnych Słowian" – "A cosmology of Ancient Slavs". Really a great book, it concentrates about general Slavic view of the world, mythology, symbolism, with many comparisons with other Indo-European cultures. It (or its predecessors, I am not sure how much of this work is a compilation, and how much is the author's own theories). Such comparisons are really helpful, and (in my opinion) the theories are quite revolutionary.

    #349857

    Anonymous

    Thanks guys!

    If you are interested in Viking items/symbols from ancient Rus’, then I can recommend archaeological artefacts from Gnyozdovo (Russian: Гнёздово; located near Smolensk on the right side of Dnieper river). Gnyozdovo is an archaeological reserve occupying 16 hectares which makes it one of the largest archaeological sites in Europe. Many Vikings and Slavic artefacts are found on the site. 

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