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  • #342153

    Anonymous
    #363438

    Anonymous

    Anything is Latin Script?

    #363439

    Anonymous

    From another forum (allowed?) http://forum.krstarica.com/showthread.php/521995-Slovenski-toponimi-čine-većinu-toponima-Albanije-ko-bi-se-tome-nadao-(Google-maps)

    Babine
    Bistrice
    Boceve
    Borje
    Borove
    Borovjan
    Borsh
    Bradashesh
    Bradoshnice
    Bradvice
    Bregas
    Bukove
    Bushtrice
    Cerave
    Cerenec
    Cerje
    Cerkovice
    Cernevake
    Corovode
    Delvine
    Dhrovjan
    Dipjake
    Divjake
    Dobrenje
    Dobrune
    Domaj
    Dracove
    Dragobi
    Dragostunj
    Drenovice
    Drini
    Drino
    Gjorice
    Golik
    Goranxi
    Gorice
    Gorishove
    Gorozup
    Gostil
    Gozhdarazhde
    Grabjan
    Grabovine
    Grazhdan
    Janjar
    Kalivac
    Kamenice
    Karkavec
    Kepenek
    Klos
    Koavhice
    Kolesjan
    Kolsjan
    Kostenje
    Kotodesh
    Kovashice
    Koze
    Krajke
    Kraste
    Kreshove
    Krickove
    Leshnice
    Leshnje
    Leskovic
    Levoshe
    Livadhja
    Lukove
    Mal Nemercke
    Mal Ostrovice
    Mal Trebishine
    Malline
    Milec
    Milot
    Nepravishte
    Nikotice
    Nizhavec
    Novo Selo
    Novoseje
    Novosele
    Ogren
    Oreshnje
    Ostren
    Pasinke
    Pendavinj
    Pevelan
    Piskupat
    Ploshtan
    Podarce
    Podgorie
    Podgradec
    Polican
    Poloske
    Porave
    Postenan
    Potkozhan
    Prodan
    Progonat
    Propisht
    Prosek
    Radanj
    Radomire
    Radove
    Roskovec
    Rreshen
    Rrogohine
    Rubik
    Selan
    Selenice
    Selishte
    Shishtavec
    Shupenze
    Sillove
    Sinice
    Skorovat
    Slabinje
    Sllatine
    Smollik
    Sopac
    Sopik
    Sopot
    Starje
    Stravaj
    Strelce
    Strembec
    Stropcke
    Strume
    Tepelene
    Topojan
    Topoje
    Trebinje
    Trepce
    Trestenik
    Trojak
    Tropoje
    Udenisht
    Ushtelence
    Uznove
    Vasije
    Velipoje
    Vernik
    Vishoshice
    Visoke
    Vlad
    Vrepcke
    Zabzun
    Zagore
    Zaroshte
    Zejmen
    Zemce
    Zminec
    Zvezde
    Vranisht

    Njivice (Nivice),
    Pepel,
    Vodice,
    Vodinje (Vodhine),
    Dražovice (Drashovice),
    Lubonje,
    Kerkove (?) ,
    Selenice,
    Novosele,
    Delinje,
    Velce,
    Radimlje (Radhime),
    Žitom,
    Gumno (Gumen),
    Golemaj,
    Podgoran,
    Rodenj,
    Vrbas (Verbas),
    Blesenča, [prasl. *blęsti]
    Lapanj,
    Drvljan (Dhrovian),
    Dragot
    Prostar (Mbrostar)
    Maliq [Malić],
    Veliqot [Velićot],
    Proceste
    Vločište
    Kolanec ["Klanac"]
    Stropan,
    Baban,
    Grace
    Ecmenik [Ječmenik]
    Vernik
    Vishocice [Visočice]
    Bilisht [Bilište]
    Trestenik [Trstenik]
    Košnice
    Dobran
    Brozdovec ["Brazdavac"]
    Roskovec
    Strume
    Velmiše
    Zemnec
    Bodrište
    Selo
    Shiroke

    #363440

    Anonymous

    One thing that confuses me about these toponyms in Albania is – why are they still there? If there is no Slavic speaking population in Albania nowadays, how come the names remain the same.

    Those settlements were undoubtedly built, or at least, majorly populated by Slavic speakers. Could have the population shift happened in such an imperceptible way that the "new" people couldn't be aware of the local toponimia?

    And also, Albania is an independent state (or some sort of) for almost 100 years now. Couldn't they change the situation once they had the power to do it?

    For example, the Greek government has done exceptional efforts in the past 80 years to get rid of every toponym that might even sound non-Greek (I believe there's no need of pointing that the accent in this process was put on the Slavic toponyms, due to some well known issues ;) ). I could only find one petition from some Albanian MP for renaming these places in Albania about 10 years ago, but I guess that wasn't realized.

    What happened to all these people of our kin?  ???

    #363441

    Anonymous

    As far as I know there are still Slavic Macedonians in Albania.

    #363442

    Anonymous

    They go shiptarized. Just look at names -ići, -ova. Tribe Klimenti for example was originaly Serbian…

    #363443

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    One thing that confuses me about these toponyms in Albania is – why are they still there? If there is no Slavic speaking population in Albania nowadays, how come the names remain the same.

    Those settlements were undoubtedly built, or at least, majorly populated by Slavic speakers. Could have the population shift happened in such an imperceptible way that the "new" people couldn't be aware of the local toponimia?

    And also, Albania is an independent state (or some sort of) for almost 100 years now. Couldn't they change the situation once they had the power to do it?

    For example, the Greek government has done exceptional efforts in the past 80 years to get rid of every toponym that might even sound non-Greek (I believe there's no need of pointing that the accent in this process was put on the Slavic toponyms, due to some well known issues ;) ). I could only find one petition from some Albanian MP for renaming these places in Albania about 10 years ago, but I guess that wasn't realized.

    What happened to all these people of our kin?  ???

    Local Slavs were assimilated becouse Šiptars were more numerous. Similary there are Slavic place names in east Germany. They got assimilated too but place names and many surnames stayed. However there are also vice versas. Many Slavic places for example bare names of German origin and there are many German surnames but all people are Slavs. For example Czechia and Slovenia and to some extent Poland and Slovakia.

    #363444

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    As far as I know there are still Slavic Macedonians in Albania.

    There are, but only in the bordering areas and the Korcha region. These toponyms are all over Albania, not only its eastern part. And the people in the rest of the country don't even recall different ethnic origin…

    #363445

    Anonymous

    There are Macedonians in Tirana and other parts aswell;

    http://www.ilinden-tirana.com/

    #363446

    Anonymous

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/02/Campaigns_of_Ivan_Assen_II.png/436px-Campaigns_of_Ivan_Assen_II.png

    It's because it's bulgarian land. When our victorious armies bring freedom to that long neglected part of Bulgaria, we'll make it into a resort. And we'll make a huge highway right through Macedonia, so locals can find employment selling chevapi to the tourists and won't have to depend on Greece for their income anymore.

    #363447

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/02/Campaigns_of_Ivan_Assen_II.png/436px-Campaigns_of_Ivan_Assen_II.png

    It's because it's bulgarian land. When our victorious armies bring freedom to that long neglected part of Bulgaria, we'll make it into a resort. And we'll make a huge highway right through Macedonia, so locals can find employment selling chevapi to the tourists and won't have to depend on Greece for their income anymore.

    image

    #363448

    Anonymous
    Quote:

    It's because it's bulgarian land. When our victorious armies bring freedom to that long neglected part of Bulgaria, we'll make it into a resort. And we'll make a huge highway right through Macedonia, so locals can find employment selling chevapi to the tourists and won't have to depend on Greece for their income anymore.

    Is this suppose to be joke or what? Because it's funny! ;D

    #363449

    Anonymous

    Bulgar Toponyms in the Balkans.

    According to early historical sources, Bulgars settled permanently in Srem and Singindunum (Belgrade) since the 5-6th century AD. Consequently, soon after that, Bulgars settled the territory of old Macedonia – dolna zemya ohridska [the Lower Land of Ohrid]. According to scripts left by the Turnovo kings, Bulgars settled Macedonia at the beginning of the 6th century, at the time of Emperor Anastasios.

    При анастасїи цари, начѧшѫ блъгарє поєма ти ꙁємѧ сїѫ, прѣшєдшє ꙋ бъдꙑнѣ и прѣждє начѧшѫ поєма ти долнѧѫ ꙁємѧ охридскѫ, и по томъ сиѧ ꙁємѧ въсѧ.

    "During the reign of Anastasius, Bulgars started to conquer this land, they passed to Bədyne [Vidin] and firstly begun to conquer the Lower land of Ohrid and later all of it."
    –Bulgarian translation of the Manasios Chronicle made during the reign of John-Alexander, 14th c. [1].

    image

    Romania and Hungary

    Banat, Turnu Məgureli, Pest …

    This important episode in the life of ancient Bulgars can be traced across maps. Dwelling since 4th century AD on both sides of the Danube, Bulgars left behind many names of fortresses and cities. Their strongholds are recognized by specific endings -shi, -ik, -ich (-ech, -esh) of their names, but also in many other ancient features. North and east of Middle Danube, in the Roman-named region of Panonia, one finds Bulgar-sounding names like Brassó, Krassó, Barca, and Barót [3]. It is possible that, both in the Tisza region and Transylvania, the Bulgar overlords relied on the remnants of another ethnic group: the Onogur-Bulgars (Wangars), who had moved into the region in the same period as the Danubian Bulgars. In this case, the above Bulgar-type toponyms might well be of Onogur-Bulgar origin [3]. Transylvania obtains from Bulgars the name Banat, which probably comes from the eastern word ban (mountain), which is found today in the Pamir languages and in the lands of the former Caucasian Bulgars. Banat in Pamirian literally means 'the mountains' and is almost a complete copy of the Latin name of Transylvania and the Slavic name of that district – zagura, which comes from the phrase za guru – 'behind the mountain'. This specifically Bulgar name – Banat – was used throughout the early Middle Ages along with the Slavic name Zagura (Zagora). And to the south and west of Transylvania, on the whole territory between the Danube and the Carpathians, appeared dozens of villages with Bulgar names – Baile, Bəilesht, Voilovo (Boilovo), Balvanesht (from balvan, 'idol'), Turda (salt mine), Turtava (in Slavic slanik, 'salt pad'), Zhupanek, Chukich, Tilva (pointed iron stake), Halənga, Turnu Məgureli, Pəunesht (from paun, 'peacock'), Toyaga (staff), Balsha, Kraguesht (from kraguy, 'hunter falcon'), Telesh (cf. the name of Khan Telets), Telesh-Birnich, Hərsesht, Zidone, Zidu, Sibin – from the Bulgar boyar name Sibin (renamed by the Romanians in Sibiu), Gubera, Alməzhiu, Segarcha, Məndra (probably the same as the Mundraga fortress, in which Simeon took defence in the war with the Magyars), Tamburesht, Tsiguresh, Tsutsulesht, Tətəran, Botorodzhi, Belchug, Tekuch-Kalinderu, Talpa-Trivalia, Okaba, Petrish, Kuzhmir, Bihar (Biharya), Hust, Bəlgrad (Gyulafehérvár), Beket, and others. Some of these names have their close counterparts further east. For example, the name Halənga reminds the word Halanga or Halandzh characteristic of Volga Bulgars and Pamir, and the names of Bihar, Hust and Beket remind the Pamir cities Bukhara, Host, and Bakat – the last of which was mentioned as early as 550 AD. The name of the former town Pest (Peshta) – one of the towns that make today Budapest – is also of ancient Eastern origin which in Pamirian literally means 'the slope, the hill'.

    Most of those names were found until recently in Romanian and Hungarian maps, and some exist even today. Almost the whole territory of present-day Romania is studded with ancient and medieval Bulgar names. The reason for this is not difficult to explain, since the oldest Bulgarian chronicle – Nominalia of the Bulgar khans, composed around 765, points out that for more than five centuries Bulgars had a country beyond the Danube ("ob onu stranu Dunaia").

    Serbia

    Srem, Belgrade, Kragujevac, Morava, Tumba, Nish, Pirot

    But these traces are found not only in Romania and Hungary. They are also preserved in the region that was the earliest Bulgar conquest on the south side of the Danube, located in today eastern Serbia.

    The first permanently controlled Bulgar land in the Balkans, recognized by Rome, is South-Danubian Panonia, with the major cities of Sirmium, Singindunum and Bononia (Dimitar Angelov. Образуване на българската народност, София, 1971). The arrival of Bulgars in this area was marked by a whole series of important changes. The city Sirmium got its new name Srem and the rivers Timakus and Margus were renamed in Timok and Morava. The river flowing to the west of Srem (today Serbianized as Mitrovica) got the name Kolubara. Old Singindunum became widely known as Alba Bulgarica ('Bulgarian town'). The Romano-Byzantine castle of Singindunum had white stone ramparts, and the Bulgars named it Belgrad, meaning 'White Castle' which contrastingly corresponds with the present-day Hungarian town Csongrád = черни град = 'black castle' [3]. Near Belgrade, a new fortress was built with the Bulgar name Tetel. All these changes occurred in the fifth-sixth century, when South-Danubian Pannonia was settled by the Bulgars. Even today most of the rivers flowing through eastern Serbia have the names given to them in that ancient Bulgar times.

    The changes that Bulgars made in the names of those rivers and towns have their own interesting history. Why, for example, the river, called Margus in Roman times was renamed by Bulgars to Morava? The reason is that in the eastern regions, from which Bulgars arrived, the word murava occurred which means 'a quiet, peaceful river'. Like many other peoples, Bulgars liked to name things in simple and understandable words for them. And that is why they translated in their language most foreign names that they found in the Balkans. They did so not only with the names of rivers, but with the names of towns. In the oldest Bulgar centers of the Balkans – the land between Vidin and Srem – many ancient town names sound even today. Kragujevac received its name from the famous Bulgar hunting falcons – kragui – raised by specially designated people – kraguyari. Even today in Eastern Caucasus in areas once inhabited by Bulgars, the word kraguy means 'falcon'. The village Kutugertsi near Timok received its name from the name of the former Bulgar healers called kutugeri. Later this name became one of the names of the Bulgarian Bogomils. Tumba peak in Timok region also has an old Bulgar name. In one of the inscriptions of Omurtag, the tall mound halfway between the Danube and Pliska was called with the same word Tumba, and today in the old Bulgar territories around Pamir, mounts bear the names Tube and Tyube. Ancient Bulgar language echoes from the names of many peaks and mountains in this region – Vrəshka Chuka, Kom, Svərlig, Kərlig, and Viskyar. Echo of these names sounds today also in the Pamir Mountains, where viskyar in some languages means 'a hill' and chuka means 'peak', and in the Bulgar lands in the Caucasus, where Svərlig literally means 'Sparrow mountain' (from svarlo, 'sparrow').

    As a souvenir left by the ancient Bulgars in Srem and Belgrade regions, an old plaque was found with Bulgar symbols, on which the typical symbol of old Bulgars – IYI – was engraved twice. The village, near which this plaque was discovered also bears a very old name. It is called Shudikovo in honor of some already forgotten Bulgar named Shudik. A similar name – shudik – is found today in the Caucasus among the neighbours of the erstwhile Kubrat Bulgars.

    In addition to these ancient Bulgar names in the region between Vidin and Belgrade several other noteworthy names are found such as Murgash village, with the same name as peak Murgash in the Balkan Mountain, and also the villages Madara, Kalubre, Karanovchich, Chikatovo (from chigat, 'sword-bearer') Veli Shatra, Beleg, Chungula, Hubava, Globare, Globoder, Stopanya, Chokotar, Chuchulyaga, Vitosh, Mərsach, Batush, Bubya, Gərgure, Lagator, Kokoshine, Tsərvulevo, Praskovche, Svirtsi, Vitoshevets, Plana, Prəzhdevo, etc. The ancient Bulgar origin of all these names is sealed in the words themselves.

    The earliest bridgehead established by the Bulgars in their first migrations in the Balkans is covered even today with typical Bulgar traces. Those are particularly abundant in Timok Region that have been severed from Bulgaria at a relatively late time – during the nineteenth century, after the liberation of Serbia. But in Belgrade and Srem there are still many traces as those were Bulgarian lands for nearly eight centuries – from the late fifth century to the mid-fourteenth century. In old times Belgrade has been best known as the place where Cyril and Methodius' students first set foot on Bulgarian soil. There, according to the hagiography of St. Kliment Ohridski, they were welcomed by the Bulgarian governor – bori-tarkhan, who conveyed them to Boris in Preslav (HBI, I, 297). Both the title of the governor, and the text of the hagiography leave no doubt that in the ninth century Belgrade was a big Bulgar fortress. At the time of Samuel, Belgrade was still a Bulgarian town and is mentioned among the conquered Bulgarian settlements by Basil II in the chrysobull of 1015 (HBI, I, 145). The Crusaders who came in 1096 in Belgrade and Nish mentioned those as Bulgarian cities, managed by dukes appointed by Byzantium.
    "As he passed the Maroa River (today's Serbian Morava) – writes the chronicler of the Crusades, Albert Aquinus, – the leader Peter the Desertman moved into the vast and extensive Bulgarian Forest … Then a messenger was sent to Duke Nikita, the Bulgarian Prince in Nish, to obtain permission to buy food." (HBI, I, 407).

    The last evidence of Belgrade as a Bulgarian town is from 1259 when it was conquered by the Magyars (PC, II, 76-77). Two centuries later, when the Magyars were pushed by the Turks beyond the Danube, Belgrade fell in the hands of the Serbs, who at that time were vassals of the Ottoman Empire. In strict observance of their vassality, Serbs settled permanently in the conquered with Turkish help town and over time it became their main stronghold.

    If we go down from Srem, Belgrade and Vidin (South-Danubian Panonia) towards Ohrid, the road passes through the ancient fortress Naisos, renamed Nish by Bulgars at the same time when Margus became Morava and Timakus became Timok. This name of the town given by the Bulgars remarkably coincides with the name of one of the most famous towns near Pamir &ndash the capital of the old Partian Empire called Nissan. Close to Nish is Pirot – another town named by Bulgars in their specific Bulgar language. The name of Pirot is similar to the eastern word pirg (stronghold). The Bulgar character of the population of Nish, Pirot, and the Timok River Basin to the north-east has been preserved at least until the beginning of the 20th century, albeit largely Serbianized, as evidenced by the British traveller Mary Edith Durham.[2] She wrote that in Pirot she saw a distinctly Bulgar cast of countenance and build. Before its annexation to Serbia in 1878 Pirot was an undoubtedly Bulgar district. The population along the frontier and around Zaitchar was Bulgar and Roumanian, the flat-faced, heavily built Bulgar with high cheekbones and lank black hair predominating. This is corroborated by local customs. Carpet making was widespread and the carpets were truly Bulgarian in origin. Carpets were not made in any other part of Serbia. And the neighbouring peasants played the bagpipe, the typical Bulgar instrument. Old books of travel call Nish Bulgar. Bulgars extend not only into the south of Serbia, but in the east spreads over the Timok.[2]

    Macedonia

    Gostivar, Vardar, Ohrid, Bitola

    From Pirot, going through Gostivar, a town named so by the Panonian Bulgars, one reaches the land of Ohrid – the Promised Land that was destined to be Bulgarian as early as the 6th century and where, according to the old Bulgarian chronicles, began the gradual settlement of Bulgarians on the Balkan Peninsula. The early settlement of Bulgars in Ohrid region is marked with the same traces as their settlement in Dacia Panonia to the north of the Danube and in Sirmium between Vidin and Srem. Coming near the Ohrid lake, the Bulgars immediately gave new names to towns. Former Lichnida got its present name Ohrid, the Lichnida Lake became Ohrid Lake, the river Axios was renamed to Vardar, the town of Pelagonia was called Bitola, the town of Selasphor became Devol, new fortresses were built and were called Struga, Prespa and Prilep. All major towns in the region of Macedonia received new names by the Bulgar settlers and this fact is explicitly noted in the old Byzantine sources.

    The Byzantine poet John Tsetsas, ridiculing the ignorance of some of his contemporaries who were not aware that Vardar was the new Bulgar name of the River Axios, even wrote a satire on this occasion.
    But the Peonians (Panonians) are Bulgars! Do not believe fools who tell you that Peonians are different people. Those fools think that Axios is different from Vardar. (IBI, t. XXII, 104).

    For Tsetsas, it was funny not to know that the Bulgars came at the shores of Ohrid Lake from Panonia, called Peonia by medieval Greek authors, and that these new settlers renamed Axios to Vardar.

    But how exactly the new names Ohrid and Vardar came into being and why the Bulgars were those who brought them in the Balkans? There are indications that in these names the ancient Bulgars put some special sense. In the Pamir and Hindukush, the ancient Bulgar native land, the word var means 'powerful'. And the rivers there most often bear the suffix Dar or Darya: Amu Darya, Sur Darya, Surhan Darya, etc. Therefore, the name Vardar was not only brought by the ancient Bulgars, but it was derived from their own language, and Tsetsas was not only once but twice correct when he scorned those who were not aware of its Bulgarian origin. The meaning that the old Bulgars put in this name is quite deep. In their language Vardar meant 'Powerful River, Heroic River'.

    Bulgars put a similar fine meaning to the name of main town of south-western Macedonia – Ohrid. It is most likely associated with the word okhro (gold) that is found to the present day in the area of the old Kubrat Bulgaria. Traces of this old Bulgar word are kept in the term okhra (yellowish paint) preserved in the modern Bulgarian language. Ohrid probably means 'golden' or 'gold-like'. Evidently, this name did not arise accidentally. It bears quite a strong resemblance to the ancient Greek name Lichnidos, which means 'shiny', 'brilliant'. Thus Ohrid, like Vardar, turned out to be an old Bulgar, quite beautiful, name: 'Golden Town'.

    Struga, Prespa, Prilep, Devol

    Other major towns of Ohrid region also carry ancient Bulgar names. The names Struga, Prespa, Prilep are understood only by someone who knows Bulgarian. The word struga exists till the present day in some Bulgarian dialects to mean 'mountain pass' or 'a narrow corridor to let sheep in the pen' (also called sturga), while prilep (bat) and pryaspa (snowdrift) are words widely used in modern Standard Bulgarian that do not exist in any other Slavic language. The name Devol, incomprehensible today, with which Bulgars renamed the town Selasphor also has a very interesting origin. Similar names of settlements are found only in the region of the Pamir, where devol means everywhere 'high fence'.

    In the speech of people from the regions of Ohrid, Prilep, Bitola, southwest Korcha and other Balkan lands we find remnants of the language spoken by the Kuber Bulgars. There is a number of hitherto unexplained words and phrases such as apotinano (and you, mommy) zhimiboga (my god), tugina (abroad), vo gerizon (in the brook), kuchento (the dog), kəshta (house), toynaka, tyanaka, az, mie (that), eve, evo, gyoa (it seems that), kod (with, at), etc. which are found even today in the Orient in the lands, sometime populated with Pamir and Caucasian Bulgars.

    The traces left behind by the ancient Bulgars on the map of the low Ohrid land once correctly known as Lower Bulgaria are unusually numerous and extend down to the coast of the Adriatic Sea. On the territory of present Albania the strongholds Kanina, Korcha, Himar, Balshi are now known from very old chronicles. These names have unmistakably old Bulgar origin. One of them, Himar, is similar to the name of the capital of Kubrat Bulgaria, Humar, while the town of Korcha sounds very similar to another large town of Kubrat Bulgaria – Korchev (today Kerch on the Azov Sea). The early presence of Bulgars in these parts is shown by the year 866 inscription found near Balshi which reports the Christianisation of the Bulgars by Khan Boris. The very name Balshi is found not only in Albania but also in two other places – beyond the Danube, in the present-day village Balshi and near Sofia, where exists a village called Balsha.

    Interestingly, during the 9th century some westernmost Bulgarian towns had two names – old Bulgar and Slavic name. For example, Balshi was called also Glavinitsa and Dubrovnik (then a town bordering Bulgaria) was called Raguza. The custom of Bulgars to give their own names to every larger town is evident throughout the regions settled by them. Bulgars named in their language even the capitals of foreign countries. Vienna, for example, was called Bech or Pecs, and Austria was called Bechko. Due to the fact that many old names of towns existed in two or even three forms, it becomes possible to understand their hidden meaning. For example, if one look at the lands of the Orient and in particular in the Pamir and Caucasus, it appears that there the word balsha means literally 'pillow', that is, the same meaning as the old Slavic word glavinitsa. Again in the Pamir one finds the word Pecs, which literally means 'curved, kinked', i.e. the same meaning as the old Slavic word viena ('bent, twisted' from the verb viya 'twist, bend'). Bulgar and Slavic names are often close matches to each other, and the Bulgar and Greek names were sometimes similar in meaning, as evidenced by the names Lichnida and Ohrid.

    It is difficult to describe all traces that ancient Bulgars left in near Ohrid and in Albania. Here will be listed only the most important and interesting examples. In South Macedonia we find the settlements Trapshi, Kolshi, Gobeshi, Belshi, Gramshi formed in the same model as the old Bulgar name Glavinitsa – Balshi. The suffix -shi that is characteristic for these names is included in old Bulgar words humshi and tulshi from the Preslav inscription and represents a special old Bulgar nominal suffix. Of old Bulgar origin in that region are the names Chuka, Chuka-borya, Tabahon, Kulumria, Okshtuni (cf. the name Ohsunos), Zhupani, Harusha, Harushasə, Bulgarets, Turan, Tumba, Tuholyo (cf. OBg, tohol in Avi-tohol), Kutsaka, Shishman, Botun, Sharenik, Kruma, Kosara, Ləoyma, Sukadzhiu (cf. OBg. sokachii, 'chef'), Plana, Munega, Dzibraka and others.

    In Central and Eastern Macedonia and Greek Thrace we find Sindel, Isperlik, Zuzula, Tsare (cerris oak), Vinyahi (cf. with Khan Vineh), peak Presian (above Kavala) peak Chavka (daw), Kishino, Shamak (name of swamp), Kanareto (village in Northern Greece), Mount Harvata and others.

    In Albania are preserved names as Kamchishta, Sharan (carp), Sharani (carps), Mostachi, Zhegulya (joke pin), Bilecha, Tsera, Plana, Shevarlie, Tolishe, Mərtsine, Chukasi (rocky peaks) Gruemira-chesme (fountain of Gruemir) Bukəmira, Bəhot, Brestus (the elm), Tana-i-bulgaritə (Tana the Bulgarian) Məniku (midget), Kuchi, Sasani, Kutse, Tsuta-Zhupanatə, Stani-i-Mizəs (Stan the Moesian), Mushan, Priska, Balsheni, Bardor (cf. OBg Barduar), Veli-Kaliman, Borichi, Bushnish (hemlock), Rabosha, etc. Drach on the Adriatic, identified as a Bulgarian town in the 7th century, also keeps its name.

    References
    Die Slavische Manasses-Chronik. Auch der Ausgabe von Jan Bogdan. Muenchen, Wilhelm Fink Verlag 1966, page 115.
    Durham, M. E. (Mary Edith), Twenty years of the Balkan tangle, BiblioBazaar, LLC, 2007, ISBN 1434634264, Project Gutenberg e-text # 19669, p. 40.
    István Bóna, Southern Transylvania under Bulgar Rule, Chapter II.6 In: History of Transylvania (Béla Köpeczi, Gen. Ed.), Vol. 1, 2001-2002 Social Science Monographs, Boulder, Colorado; Atlantic Research and Publications, Inc. Highland Lakes, New Jersey

    #363450

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    blah blah Pamir blah blah folk etymology blah blah I have Petar Dobrev instead of brain

    image

    Quote:
    One thing that confuses me about these toponyms in Albania is – why are they still there? If there is no Slavic speaking population in Albania nowadays, how come the names remain the same.

    Toponymy is very conservative thing usually. In every place where there was some ethnic substrate different from the current population, there are always some traces of it in the toponymy. The same goes for the adstrate, of course.

    #363451

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Bulgar Toponyms in the Balkans.

    The title of this thread is "Slavic toponyms in Albania", not "Bulgar toponyms in Albania", neither "Proto-Bulgar toponyms in Albania" (in case you, or I, got confused).

    Anyway, this post reminds me of "Γη, ο πλανήτης των Ελλήνων"; but in this case we've got "Балканите, полуострова на Българите".  :) It is strange how every major place name is connected with Proto-Bulgar, which, after all, is still an obscure language; and is compared with Central Asian and Middle Eastern names. Most of those territories above were never populated with Bulgars, and many of them were only for a brief period under jurisdiction of the Bulgarian Empire – not enough to leave such an imprint in the local toponimy and microtoponimy.

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