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  • #344041

    Anonymous

    something about a warrior hero from your nation.

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    Domagoj of Croatia

    Domagoj (died in 876) was a Duke of Dalmatian Croatia in 864–876. He is the founder of the House of Domagojević.

    Domagoj was a powerful Croatian nobelman, with lands around Knin. Following the death of Trpimir I in 864, he usurped the throne of Zdeslav in a civil war. Domagoj became the Duke of Dalmatian Croatia, and Trpimir's sons, Petar, Zdeslav and Muncimir, were forced into exile. During Domagoj's reign piracy was a common practice, which caused bad relations with the Venice. In 865 Domagoj was forced to make an unfavourable peace with the Venetian Republic, giving hostages to Venice as a guarantee for safe passage of Venetian ships in the Adriatic Sea.

    Domagoj helped the Franks, as their vassal, to conquer Bari from the Arabs in 871. In the meantime, the Venetians also renewed their attacks on Croats. In 874, Pope John VIII intervened by begging Duke Domagoj as a Christian to restrain his Pirates.

    After Domagoj's death, Venetian's chronicles named him The worst duke of Slavs (Latin: pessimus dux Sclavorum). Pope John VIII referred to Domagoj in letters as Famous duke (Latin: glourisus dux).

    #395996

    Anonymous
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    [size=18pt]

    Vlatko Vuković

    [/size]

    Vlatko Vuković Kosača (d. 1392) was a 14th-century Bosnian vojvoda (Duke) and one of the best military commanders of King Tvrtko I of Bosnia. He was the lord of a semi-independent realm of "Zahumlje" (Hum) of the Kingdom of Bosnia.

    He was a son of Duke Vuk Kosača, the founder of the noble house known as the Kosačas. He governed the province of Hum, which was part of the Banate of Bosnia. The Ottoman threat was building to the east, threatening neighboring Herzegovina. On August 27, 1388, Grand Duke Vlatko defeated an Ottoman raiding party (some 18,000 strong) that had invaded Hum in the Battle of Bileća. Bosnian heavy cavalry are typically credited with winning the battle as they broke the Ottoman ranks and pursued the retreating enemy. It has been cited that "Ottoman leader Shain barely managed to save himself with the small band of his soldiers".In 1389, he commanded an army that fought alongside Serbian Prince Lazar Hrebeljanović at the Battle of Kosovo against the Ottomans. Vuković was one of few commanders who survived the battle. Although the battle is viewed now as a decisive defeat at the time the battle was viewed differently; Vuković reported the outcome of the battle as a victory, as the Ottomans suffered heavy losses and were forced to withdraw for a time.

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    A council was convoked by the king or noblemen who opposed the sale of Konavli by Radič Sanković to Dubrovnik, He and Pavle Radenović later captured Konavli and divided it between themselves. Vlatko later died.

    He died in 1392. His nephew Sandalj Hranić succeeded him.

    Vuković's grave lies marked near the village of Boljuni near Stolac, in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Inscription on the grave was written in Bosancica: "Ase leži dobri junak i čovek Vlatko Vuković" (Here lies Vlatko Vukovic, a good man and a hero).

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    His grave

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    "Here lies Vlatko Vukovic, a good man and a hero" in Bosnian, Serbian or Croatian written with Cyrillic letters.

    Source: wikipedia

    #395997

    Anonymous

    Nice thread Druzhina! Never seen that Image of Domagoj, please share more from that source about other warriors

    #395998

    Anonymous

    Stevan Sindjelic / Стеван Синђелић / Stevan Sinđelić
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    – Stevan Sindjelic was a Serbian military commander of the Resava Infantry Brigade of the Serbian Revolutionary Army which fought during the First Serbian Uprising (1804-1813) against Ottoman rule. As the commander of the Resava Brigade, he fought in many battles and skirmishes against Ottoman foot-soldiers, including the Battle of Ivankovac in 1805 and the Battle of Deligrad in 1806. He is remembered for his actions during the Battle of Čegar Hill in 1809, in which he and the Resava Brigade found themselves surrounded by the Ottomans. Encircled and without much chance of survival, Sinđelić ignited the gunpowder kegs in the powder cave, creating an enormous explosion that killed him, all of the Serb rebels and thousands of Ottoman soldiers. He is a symbol of patriotism, personal courage and sacrifice among Serbs.

    The Skull Tower / Ћеле кула / Ćele kula
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    Sindjelic skull
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    – The Skull Tower is a monument to 19th century Serbian rebels. It is situated in Niš, on the old Constantinople Road leading to Sofia. The monument was built using the skulls of the Serbs killed by order of Ottoman Sultan Mahmud II during the 1809 Battle of Čegar.

    #395999

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Nice thread Druzhina! Never seen that Image of Domagoj, please share more from that source about other warriors

    Yeah its definatly my favorite pic of Domagoj, however there are very few pictures of old Croatian warriors that I have seen in general (Domagoj included). So when I come across some its pretty cool. Hail our warrior-pirate Knez!

    #396000

    Anonymous

    image
    Petko Kiryakov Kaloyanov (Bulgarian: Петко Киряков Калоянов), better known as Captain Petko Voyvoda (Капитан Петко Войвода) (6 December 1844–7 February 1900) was a 19th-century Bulgarian hajduk leader and freedom fighter who dedicated his life to the liberation of Bulgaria (and, particularly, the region of Thrace).

    Petko was born in the Bulgarian village of Dogan Hisar, today Aisymi (Evros regional unit, Greece). He married a Greek lady from Maronia in 1860. When a group of Turkish brigands assaulted his wife, he fought and killed them all, including the leader of bashibuzuks Mehmed Kesedji Bey.

    Beginning from 1861 Petko began fighting against Ottomans in surrounding areas of Maroneia, Aisymi, Enos етс. He took part in an uprising on Crete in 1866–1869, visited Italy in 1866, meeting Giuseppe Garibaldi who became a close friend. Petko lived in Garibaldi's home for a few months. Garibaldi helped Petko organize the well-known "Garibaldi Battalion" in Cretan Revolt (1866–1869), consisting of 220 Italians and 67 Bulgarians, who heroically fought the Ottomans on Crete. Petko voivoda and the detachments in his command bravely defended the Hellenic cause. For his service, Petko was assigned to military rank of Kapitan (Captain).

    Petko Voyvoda's detachment, established in 1869, took part in the Russo-Turkish War of 1877-78. His unit liberated Maroneia from Turkish yoke in December 1877, established a Christian government there. He for 3 months fought against the Turks and saved the local population from Turkish molestation. After that he took part in the liberation of the Rhodopes together with Kraycho Voyvoda. Petko with his son and new wife Rada Kravkova from Kazanlak lived in Varna after 1880 and died in that city in 1900.

    His revolutionary work has been commemorated with numerous monuments all around Bulgaria, as well as in his native village in modern Greece and on the hill of Gianicolo in Rome, where a monument of Garibaldi also stands. The TV series Captain Petko Voivode written by Nikolay Haytov and first aired in 1981 also popularized him as a national hero. There are several Bulgarian patriotic songs dedicated to Petko and his comrades.

    Petko Voyvoda Peak on Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica was also named in his honor.

    Monuments dedicated to Petko Voyvoda are in Aisymi (Greece), his place of birth, as well as in Rome (Italy), and in Varna, Sofia, Burgas, Plovdiv and other places in Bulgaria.

    Petko Voyvoda's  monument  in  the Janiculum, Rome, Italy
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    Georgi Nikolov Delchev
    He was born in a large family on February 4, 1872 (January 23, Old Style) in Kukush, then in the Ottoman Empire (today in Greece). By the mid-19th century Kukush was populated predominantly with Macedonian Bulgarians  and became one of the centers of the Bulgarian National Revival.  In 1857 the enlightening scholar Dimitar Miladinov introduced Bulgarian language classes here and managed to arrange a liturgy in Church Slavonic to be held in 1858 by a Bulgarian monk from the Zograf Monastery.  In 1859 Parteniy Zografski was appointed as Orthodox Metropolitan here, in order to counter the spread of Eastern Catholicism in the area.  However, in 1874 Kukush became one of the centers of the Bulgarian Uniat Church.  Finally, after 1884 most of its population gradually joined the Bulgarian Exarchate.

    As a student Delchev began first to study in the Uniate's primary school and then in the Exarchate's junior high school.[37] He also read widely in the town's chitalishte, where he was impressed with revolutionary books, and especially Delchev was imbued with the ideas of Bulgarian liberation struggle.[38] In 1888 his family sent him to the Bulgarian Men's High School of Thessaloniki, where he organized and led a secret revolutionary brotherhood.  Delchev also distributed revolutionary literature, which he acquired from the school’s graduates who studied in Bulgaria. Graduation from a high school was faced with few career prospects and Delchev decided to follow the path of his former school-mate Boris Sarafov, entering the Military school in Sofia in 1891. He at first encountered the newly independent Bulgaria full of idealism and dedication, but he later became disappointed with the commercialized life of the society and with the authoritarian politics of the dictator Stefan Stambolov. Gotsе spent his leaves in the company of emigrants from Macedonia. Most of them belonged to the Young Macedonian Literary Society. One of his friends was Vasil Glavinov, a leader of the Macedonian-Adrianople faction of the Bulgarian Social Democratic Workers Party. Through Glavinov and his comrades, he came into contact with a different people, who offered a new forms of social struggle. In June 1892 Delchev and the journalist Kosta Shahov, a chairman of the Young Macedonian Literary Society, met in Sofia with the bookseller from Salonica, Ivan Hadzhinikolov. Hadzhinikolov disclosed on this meeting his plans to create a revolutionary organization in Ottoman Macedonia. They discussed together its basic principles and agreed fully on all scores. Delchev explained, he has no intention of remaining an officer and promised after graduating from the Military School, he will return to Macedonia to join the organization. In September 1894, only a month before graduation, he was expelled because his political activity as a member of illegal socialist circle. He was given a possibility to enter the Army again through re-applyng for commission, but he refused. Afterwards he returned to European Turkey to work there as a teacher, hoping to organize a national liberation movement through the Bulgarian Exarchate's educational net.

    Teacher and revolutionist

    Meanwhile in Ottoman Thessaloniki a revolutionary organization was founded in 1893, by a small band of anti-Ottoman Macedono-Bulgarian revolutionaries, including Hadzhinikolov. At this time the name of the organization was Bulgarian Macedonian-Adrianople Revolutionary Committees (BMARC), in 1902 changed to Secret Macedonian-Adrianople Revolutionary Organization (SMARO).  It was decided at a meeting in Resen in August 1894 to preferably recruit teachers from the Bulgarian schools as committee members.  In the Autumn of 1894 Delchev became teacher in an Еxarchate's school in Štip, where he met another teacher – Dame Gruev, who was also a leader of the newly established local committee of BMARC.  Gruev introduced Delchev to the plan already outlined by the Central Committee of Thessaloniki. As result Delchev joined the organization immediately and he gradually became one of its main leaders. After this, both Gruev and Delchev worked together in Štip and its environs. At the same time the Organization developed quickly and had managed to begin establishing a network of local organizations across Macedonia and the Adrianople Vilayet, usually centered around the schools of the Bulgarian Exarchate.  The expansion of the BMARC at the time was considerable, particularly after Gruev settled in Thessaloniki during the years 1895–1897, in the quality of a Bulgarian school inspector. Under his direction, Delchev travelled during the vacations throughout Macedonia and established and organized committees in villages and cities. Delchev also established contacts with some of the leaders of the Supreme Macedonian-Adrianople Committee (SMAC). Its official declaration was a struggle for autonomy of Macedonia and Thrace. However, as a rule, most of SMAC's leaders were officers with stronger connections with the governments, waging terrorist struggle against the Ottomans in the hope of provoking a war and thus Bulgarian annexation of both areas. He arrived illegally in Bulgaria's capital and tried to get support from the SMAC's leadership. Delchev had a number of meetings with Danail Nikolaev, Yosif Kovachev, Toma Karayovov, Andrey Lyapchev and others, but he was often frustrated of their views. As a whole, Delchev had a negative attitude towards their activities. After spending the next school year (1895/1896) as a teacher in the town of Bansko, in May 1896 he was arrested by the Ottoman authorities as person suspected in revolutianary activity and spent about a month in the jail. In August Delchev participated in the Thessaloniki Congress of BMARC, where a new structure of the Organization was adopted. Short afterwards Delchev gave his resignation as teacher and in the late Autumn of 1896, he moved back to Bulgaria. According to the decisions of the Congress, Delchev, together with Gyorche Petrov, served as a foreign representatives of the Organization in Sofia.[48] At that time the organization was largely dependent on the Bulgarian state and army assistance, that was mediated by the foreign
    representatives.

    Revolutionary activity as part of the leadership of the Organization

    Delchev's involvement in BMARC was an important moment in the history of the Macedonian-Adrianople liberation movement.  The years between the end of 1896, when he left the Exarchate's educational system and 1903 when he died, represented the final and most effective revolutionary phase of his short life. In the period 1897–1902 he was a representative of the Foreign Committee of the BMARC in Sofia. Again in Sofia, negotiating with suspicious politicians and arms merchants, Delchev saw more of the unpleasant face of the Principality, and became even more disillusioned with its political system. In 1897 he, along with Gyorche Petrov, wrote the new organization's statute, which divided Macedonia and Adrianople areas into seven regions, each with a regional structure and secret police, following the Internal Revolutionary Organization's example. Below the regional committees were districts.  The Central committee was placed in Salonica. In 1898 Delchev decided to be created a permanent acting armed bands (chetas) in every district. From 1902 till his death he was the leader of the chetas, i.e. the military institute of the Organization because, he had considerable knowledge in the area of military skills. Delchev ensured the functioning of the underground border crossings of the organization and the arms depots added to them, alongside the then Bulgarian-Ottoman border.

    His correspondence with other BMARC/SMARO members covers extensive data on supplies, transport and storage of weapons and ammunition in Macedonia. Delchev envisioned independent production of weapons, which resulted in the establishment of a bomb manufacturing plant in the village of Sabler near Kyustendil in Bulgaria. The bombs were later smuggled across the Ottoman border into Macedonia.Gotse Delchev was the first to organize and lead a band into Macedonia with the purpose of robbing or kidnapping a rich Turks. His experiences demonstrate the weaknesses and difficulties which the Organization faced in its early years. Later he was one of the organizers of the Miss Stone Affair. He made two short visits to the Adrianople area of Thrace in 1896 and 1898.  In the winter of 1900 he resided for a while in Burgas, where Delchev organized another bomb manufacturing plant, which dynamite was used later by the Thessaloniki bombings.  In 1900 he inspected also the BMARC's detachments in Eastern Thrace again, aiming better coordination between Macedonian and Thracian revolutionary committees. Since the Autumn of 1901 till the early Spring of 1902, he made an important inspection in Macedonia, touring all revolutionary districts there. He led also the congress of the Adrianople revolutionary district held in Plovdiv in April 1902. Afterwards Delchev inspected the BMARC's structures in the Central Rhodopes. The inclusion of the rural areas into the organizational districts contributed to the expansion of the organization and the increase in its membership, while providing the essential prerequisites for the formation of the military power of the organization, at the same time having Delchev as its military advisor (inspector) and chief of all internal revolutionary bands.

    After 1897 there was a rapid growth of secret Officer's brotherhoods, whose members by 1900 numbered about a thousand. Much of the Brotherhoods' activists were involved in the revolutionary activity of the BMORK.  Among the main supporters of their activities was Gotse Delchev.  Delchev aimed also better coordination between BMARC and the Supreme Macedonian-Adrianople Committee. For a short time in the late 1890s lieutenant Boris Sarafov, who was former school-mate of Delchev became its leader. At that period the foreign representatives Delchev and Petrov became by rights members of the leadership of the Supreme Committee and so BMARC even managed to gain de facto control of the SMAC. Nevertheless it soon split into two factions: one loyal to the BMARC and one led by some officers close to the Bulgarian prince. Delchev opposed this officers' insistent attempts to gain control over the activity of BMARC.  Sometimes SMAC even clashed militarily with local SMARO bands as in the autumn of 1902. Then the Supreme Macedonian-Adrianople Committee organized a failed uprising in Pirin Macedonia (Gorna Dzhumaya), which merely served to provoke Ottoman repressions and hampered the work of the underground network of SMARO.

    The primary question regarding the timing of the uprising in Macedonia and Thrace implicated an apparent discordance not only among the SMAC and the SMARO, but also among the SMARO's leadership. At the Salonika Congress of January 1903, where Delchev did not participate, an early uprising was debated and it was decided to stage one in the Spring of 1903. This led to fiercing debates among the representatives at the Sofia SMARO's Conference in March 1903. By that time two strong tendecies had crystallized within the SMARO. The right-wing majority was convinced that if the Organization would unleash a general uprising, Bulgaria would be provoced to declare war of the Ottomans and after the subsequent intervention of the Great Powers the Еmpire would collapse. The left-wing faction led by Delchev, on the other hand, warned against the risks of such unrealistic plans, opposing the uprising as inappropriate as tactics and premature by time.  Deltchev, who was under the influence of the leading Bulgarian anarchists as Mihail Gerdzhikov and Varban Kilifarski personally supported the tactics of permanent terrorist attacks as the Thessaloniki bombings of 1903.  Finally, he had no choice but agree to that course of action at least managing to delay its start from May to August. Delchev also convinced the SMARO leadership to transform its idea of a mass rising involving the civil population into a rising based on guerrilla warfare. Towards the end of March 1903 Gotse with his detachment destroyed the railway bridge over Angista river, aiming to test the new guerrilla tactics. Following that he set out for Salonica to meet with Dame Gruev after his release from prison in March 1903. Dame Gruev met with Delchev in the late April and they discussed the decision of starting the uprising. Afterwards they negotiated with some of the Salonica bombers to ask them to give up the attacks as dangerous to the liberation movement, or at least to wait for the impending uprising. Subsequently Delchev met also with Ivan Garvanov, who was at that time the leader of the SMARO.  After this meetings Delchev headed for Mount Ali Botush where he was expected to meet with representatives from the Seres Revolutionary District detachments and to check their military preparation. But he never made it.

    Death and aftermath
    Meanwhile, on April 28, members of the Gemidzii circle started terrorist attacks in Salonica. As a consequence martial law was declared in the city and many Turkish soldiers and "bashibozouks" where concentrated in the Salonica Vilayet. This led eventually to the tracking of Delchev's cheta and his subsequent death. He died on May 4, 1903 in a skirmish with the Turkish police near the village of Banitsa, probably after betrayal by local villagers, as rumours asserted, while preparing the Ilinden-Preobrazhenie Uprising.  After being identified by the local authorities in Seres, the bodies of Delchev and his comrade, Dimitar Gushtanov, were buried in a common grave in Banitsa. Soon afterwards SMARO, aided by SMAC organized the uprising against the Ottomans, which after the initial successes, was crushed with much loss of life. Two of his brothers, Mitso Delchev and Milan Delchev were also killed fighting against the Ottomans as militants in the SMARO chetas of the Bulgarian voivodas Hristo Chernopeev and Krstjo Asenov in 1901 and 1903, respectively. In 1914, with a royal decree of Tsar Ferdinand I, a pension for life was granted to their father Nikola Delchev, because of the merits of his sons to the freedom of Macedonia.

    During the First Balkan War of 1912, the Ottoman Empire was defeated by the Balkan League and forced to concede almost all of its European territories, leaving Kilkis within the new boundaries of Bulgaria. During the Second Balkan War of 1913, Kilkis was taken by the Greeks and all of its pre-war 7,000 Bulgarian inhabitants, including Delchev's family, were expelled to Bulgaria by the Greek Army. The same happened to the population of Banitsa, the village where Delchev was buried. During the First World War, when Bulgaria was a second time in control of the area, Delchev's remains were transferred to Sofia, where they rested until after the Second World War. During the Second World War, the area was taken by the Bulgarians again and Delchev's grave near Banitsa was restored. In May 1943, on the occasion of the 40-th anniversary of his death, a memorial plaque was set in Banitsa, in the presence of his sisters and other public figures.Until then Delchev was considered one of the greatest Bulgarians from Macedonia.

    The restored grave-place of Delchev during WWII Bulgarian annexation of Northern Greece. It was blown up in 1946.
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    Delchev (right) with  the author  Peyo Yavorov  witch is  friend and biografer of Delchev

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    Bulgarian postcard (1904) representing Delchev and IMARO cheta. The inscription above reads: "The immortal Delchev."
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    #396001

    Anonymous

    Here in Australian schools everyone is taught the truth and  Goce Delčev is a famous Macedonian. Not sure who is telling you lies that he is a bulga?

    #396002

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Here in Australian schools everyone is taught the truth and  Goce Delčev is a famous Macedonian. Not sure who is telling you lies that he is a bulga?

    So why he is bulgarian orthodox christian and  why he considerd himself as bulgarian revoliutionrnist

    #396003

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    So why he is bulgarian orthodox christian and  why he considerd himself as bulgarian revoliutionrnist

    Delchev (left) and his former classmate  Gotse Imov as officer cadets in Sofia.
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    #396004

    Anonymous

    image

    Husein-kapetan Gradaščević (31 August 1802 – 17 August 1834) was a Bosniak  general who fought for Bosnian autonomy in the Ottoman Empire. He is often referred to as "Zmaj od Bosne", meaning "Dragon of Bosnia". Gradaščević was born in Gradačac in 1802—hence his surname Gradaščević, meaning "of Gradačac"—and grew up surrounded by a political climate of turmoil in the western reaches of the Ottoman Empire. The young Husein developed a reputation for wise rule and tolerance and soon became one of the most popular figures in Bosnia.

    #396005

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    image

    Husein-kapetan Gradaščević (…)

    Was he a Slav?

    #396006

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Was he a Slav?

    Yes he was. :)

    #396007

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Yes he was. :)

    Thank you :)

    #396008

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Was he a Slav?

    of course he was he is a bosniak ;)

    #396009

    Anonymous
    Quote:

    image

    [size=18pt]

    Vlatko Vuković

    [/size]

    Vlatko Vuković Kosača (d. 1392) was a 14th-century Bosnian vojvoda (Duke) and one of the best military commanders of King Tvrtko I of Bosnia. He was the lord of a semi-independent realm of "Zahumlje" (Hum) of the Kingdom of Bosnia.

    He was a son of Duke Vuk Kosača, the founder of the noble house known as the Kosačas. He governed the province of Hum, which was part of the Banate of Bosnia. The Ottoman threat was building to the east, threatening neighboring Herzegovina. On August 27, 1388, Grand Duke Vlatko defeated an Ottoman raiding party (some 18,000 strong) that had invaded Hum in the Battle of Bileća. Bosnian heavy cavalry are typically credited with winning the battle as they broke the Ottoman ranks and pursued the retreating enemy. It has been cited that "Ottoman leader Shain barely managed to save himself with the small band of his soldiers".In 1389, he commanded an army that fought alongside Serbian Prince Lazar Hrebeljanović at the Battle of Kosovo against the Ottomans. Vuković was one of few commanders who survived the battle. Although the battle is viewed now as a decisive defeat at the time the battle was viewed differently; Vuković reported the outcome of the battle as a victory, as the Ottomans suffered heavy losses and were forced to withdraw for a time.

    image

    A council was convoked by the king or noblemen who opposed the sale of Konavli by Radič Sanković to Dubrovnik, He and Pavle Radenović later captured Konavli and divided it between themselves. Vlatko later died.

    He died in 1392. His nephew Sandalj Hranić succeeded him.

    Vuković's grave lies marked near the village of Boljuni near Stolac, in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Inscription on the grave was written in Bosancica: "Ase leži dobri junak i čovek Vlatko Vuković" (Here lies Vlatko Vukovic, a good man and a hero).

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    His grave

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    "Here lies Vlatko Vukovic, a good man and a hero" in Bosnian, Serbian or Croatian written with Cyrillic letters.

    Source: wikipedia

    one of my favourite bosniaks

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