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  • #396010

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    good topic ;)

    Vasily Zaytsev Grigoryevich
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    was a Soviet sniper during World War II, particularly noted for his activities between November 10 and December 17, 1942, during the Battle of Stalingrad. He killed 225 soldiers and officers of the Wehrmacht and other axes armies, including 11 snipers.

    Zaytsev served in the Soviet Navy as a clerk in Vladivostok. When Germany invaded the Soviet Union, Zaytsev, like many of his comrades, volunteered to be transferred to the front line. At the time, he had already attained the rank of Sergeant Major.

    Before November 10, he had already killed 32 soldiers axis with the standard Mosin-Nagant rifle. Between October 1942 and January 1943, Zaitsev is about 400 kills.

    Title of Hero of the Soviet Union (22 February 1943).
        Title of "Honorary Citizen of the heroic city of Stalingrad" (7 May 1980).
        Order of Lenin
        Two Orders of the Red Banner
        Order of the Patriotic War, 1st class
        Various military medals

    Vassili Zaitsev tells about famous sniper duel

    In 2001, a feature film, Enemy at the Gates, starring Jude Law , as Zaytsev :

    Enemy at the Gate Trailer

    The story is ok but i think that Enemy at the Gates was not very good .  :)

    #396011

    Anonymous

    Dimitar Spisarevski
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    Dimitar Spisarevski (Bulgarian: Димитър Списаревски) (19 Jully 1916—20 December 1943) was a Bulgarian fighter pilot known for taking down an American bomber by ramming it during the bombing of Sofia in World War II.

    Born in Dobrich on 19 June 1916, Spisarevski moved with his family after the post-World War I Treaty of Neuilly ceded the city to Romania, consecutively living in Lom, Belogradchik and Sofia.

    Spisarevski entered His Majesty's Military School, but was expelled and went to serve in Yambol. Due to his excellent conduct, he was called back as a cadet to the school. When a pilot contest was announced, he was among the first candidates for the new subject. Later, he went on to study in Nazi Germany, where he graduated from the fighter pilot school in Werneuchen in 1938. In the summer of 1943, he was sent to the English Channel with another Bulgarian pilot to observe the German pilots and master aerial warfare tactics.

    On 20 December 1943, a group of 200 American B-24 Liberator bombers and fighter planes headed to Sofia in order to bomb the Bulgarian capital once again. 36 Bulgarian airplanes took off in order to intercept the bombers before they reached Sofia. Spisarevski was one of the Bulgarian Air Force's Messerschmitt Ме-109G-2 pilots on duty in Bozhurishte who were sent to intercept the bombers before they could reach the city.
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    According to the battle log of the 3/6 fighter wing, of which Spisarevski was part, the battle went the following way: the American B-24 aircraft flew towards Sofia in V-shaped formations of three, echeloned in a long rear column. The Bulgarians formed an opposing battle row, echeloned in squadrons of four in a rear column, at 6,000 m. The wing had the task to engage the enemy P-38 Lightning fighters while at the same time the other wing, 2/6, would hit the bombers and force them to release their bombs outside the city.

    Flying Officer Spisarevski's aircraft failed to start and he took off in a reserve plane with some delay in what would be his first and only aerial battle. When he reached the bombers, the battle had already begun. Spisarevski evaded two American fighters, headed to a group of 16 Liberators and, without ceasing fire, crashed into the leading bomber. The bomber split in mid-air and only the tail gunner survived. Spisarevski's machine crashed at the heights near the village of Pasarel close to Sofia. His body was found among the debris. The hit American bomber crashed on the other side of the village. For the taking down of a four-engine bomber, he was credited posthumously with three aerial victories and promoted to the rank of Captain. Spisarevski was buried in the Central Sofia Cemetery, in the Walk of Pilots.

    Note:It's sadly that people like him are forgoten  , and only idolized by skinheads and other  NS  idiots  >:(

    #396012

    Anonymous

    Vojvoda Bogut
    [hr]
    Vojvoda Bogut was a 14th-century Serbian military commander (voivode) of the Serbian Emperor Stefan Dušan "The Mighty" of the Serbian Empire (1331-1355).

    He was a noble (vlastelin), mayor (Lord) of Jablan grad, a medieval city in Bosnia, near Ugljevik. He gave his name to Bogutovo Selo a village in Ugljevik, modern Republika Srpska, Bosnia & Herzegovina, in the territory of his rule. He had a son, Đurađ Bogutović, also a nobleman. Bogut is the first known ancestor of the House of Petrovic-Njegoš, the 17th-century ruling family of Montenegro.

    #396013

    Anonymous

    17th century Bulgarian rebel Karposh Voivoda

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    In October 1689, an uprising broke out in the region between Kyustendil, Pirot, and Skopje. According to the Turkish historian Silahdar Findikli Mehmed Aga, its leader Karposh initially was voivode of haiduks in the vicinity of Dospat, in present-day Bulgaria, but later the Turks named him chief of Christian auxiliary forces in the area between Sofia, Veles, Dojran, Kjustendil and Nevrokop. However, he switshed the side and attacked and captured Kriva Palanka, an Ottoman stronghold, which he made center of his resistance. After securing Kriva Palanka, the rebels built and secured a new stronghold near Kumanovo. It is unclear whether the Austrians assisted the rebels. According to contemporary Ottoman chronicles and local legends, Karposh was known as the "King of Kumanovo", a title conferred upon him by Emperor Leopold I who sent him a busby (a tall fur hat worn by hussars and guardsmen) as a gift and a sign of recognition. On April 6, 1690, Emperor Leopold I (1657-1705) issued a manifesto calling all peoples of Albania, Serbia, Moesia, Bulgaria, Illyria, Macedonia to join the Austrian forces against the Ottomans. Several days later, on April 26th, 1690, Emperor Leopold I issued a letter where he took the Macedonian people under his wing.

    The situation for the rebels did not turn out well due to military and political reversals which played a decisive role in the fate of the uprising. The first step taken by the Turkish Ottoman authorities in the region was to put down the rebellion and drive the Austrian army out of Ottoman territory. To do that the Ottomans employed the services of the Crimean Khan Selim I Giray.

    The council of war which met in Sofia on November 14, 1689 decided to attack the rebels through Kyustendil. But before they could do that they had to secure Kriva Palanka. Upon finding that they were about to be attacked, the rebels set fire to Kriva Palanka and concentrated their forces in the new fortress of Kumanovo. They just managed to make some preparations when the Ottoman and Tatar detachments arrived. The rebels were quickly overwhelmed by the numerically superior Ottoman force. A large number of rebels, including Karposh, were captured at the outset.

    When the battle was over, all rebels who resisted were slaughtered. Karposh and the others were taken prisoner. After subduing Kumanovo, the Ottomans left for Skopje where they executed Karposh and the others.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karposh

    #396014

    Anonymous

    I hope it will be appropriate to write here not about a hero, but about 60 unnamed Russian heroes.

    [img width=700 height=491]http://sphotos-c.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/550573_518211891523112_1753387680_n.jpg” />

    "Dead Men Attack" (Osoviec, 1915)

    1915. WWI. Russian base – Osoviec garrison was ordered to withstand at least 48 hours, they were standing for 190 days. Not having success with artillery and numerous attacks, German troops used poisonous gases consisting of chlorine and bromine. Defenders did not have any gasmasks at all. According to eyewitnesses, the action of gases turned grass to yellow and the leaves on the trees folded and fell. Assuming that all the defenders of the fortress are dead, German troops launched an offensive. 14 Landwehr battalions – not less than 7000 marines – came up to the advanced stronghold, but unexpectedly the remaining 60 Russian defenders went out. Counterattacking Russians had a terrible appearance – with chemical burns on their faces, with mouths wrapped in rags, shaking with terrible cough, literally spitting out pieces of their lungs on the bloody shirts. That attack and the appearance of attacking horrified the German units and turned them into a stampede. August 6 – is a day when 60 half-dead soldiers forced 7000 army to run.

    Варя Стрижак. Атака Мертвецов, или Русские Не Сдаются!

    #396015

    Anonymous

    Sviatoslav I
    Sviatoslav I was the Grand Prince of Kiev from 945-972 AD. He ascended to the throne after his father Igor was killed in battle against the Belarusians.  He initially reigned with his mother Olga as regent until he reached maturity in 963. Upon taking the reins of state he immediately began expanding eastward, conquering an Empire of Jewish Turks called the Khazars, in addition to the submission of several Slavic tribes. In 971, Sviatoslav invaded Bulgarian and conquered the Bulgarian state, leading to a conflict over the region with the Byzantines, in which Sviatoslav was defeated by The Byzantine emperor John.  He returned home to Kiev, only to be killed in an ambush by the Byzantine allied Penechegs under their Khan Kurya, who went on to make Sviatoslav’s skull into a chalice.
    Seeing as I love military history, I might post more of these later.

    #396016

    Anonymous

    Sava Kovačević
    A Yugoslav Partisan during World War 2. He was born in Montenegro to a family of Peasants. He at first worked as a blacksmith, but later adopted Communism and joined the Communist Party of Yugoslavia in the year of 1925. He climbed up the ranks and eventualy became one of the Communist Leaders in Montenegro. During the Battle of Neretva he and his Brigade Commisoner encountered Italian tanks and were able to jump onto them and kill the Italians within and capture the tanks.(There were three tanks and they got two). During the great Battle of Sutjeska he was killed while personaly leading the attack on the 118th German Division which was entrenched. He was one of the most popular Partisan Commanders and famous for his self courage.
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    #396017

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Sava Kovačević
    A Yugoslav Partisan during World War 2. He was born in Montenegro to a family of Peasants. He at first worked as a blacksmith, but later adopted Communism and joined the Communist Party of Yugoslavia in the year of 1925. He climbed up the ranks and eventualy became one of the Communist Leaders in Montenegro. During the Battle of Neretva he and his Brigade Commisoner encountered Italian tanks and were able to jump onto them and kill the Italians within and capture the tanks.(There were three tanks and they got two). During the great Battle of Sutjeska he was killed while personaly leading the attack on the 118th German Division which was entrenched. He was one of the most popular Partisan Commanders and famous for his self courage.
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    i love that guy a true hero and yugoslav
    here is a song about him

    Sivi sokole

    #396018

    Anonymous

    image

    Kraljevic Marko
    Marko Mrnjavčević (Serbian Cyrillic: Марко Мрњавчевић, (c. 1335 – 1395) was de jure the Serbian king from 1371 to 1395, while he was the de facto ruler of a territory in western Macedonia centered on the town of Prilep. He is known as Prince Marko(Serbian Cyrillic: Краљевић Марко, Kraljević Marko, King Marko (Bulgarian and Macedonian: Kрaли Марко) in South Slavic oral tradition, in which he has become a major character during the Ottoman occupation of the Balkans. Marko's father, King Vukašin, was the co-ruler alongside Serbian Tsar Stefan Uroš V, whose reign was marked by the weakening of the central authority and the gradual disintegration of the Serbian Empire. Vukašin's personal holdings included lands in western Macedonia, Kosovo and Metohija. In 1370 or 1371, he crowned Marko "young king"; this title included the possibility that Marko succeed the childless Uroš on the Serbian throne.
    On 26 September 1371, Vukašin's forces were defeated in the Battle of Maritsa and he lost his life. About two months later, Tsar Uroš died. This formally made Marko the king of the Serbian land; however, great Serbian noblemen, who had become effectively independent from the central authority, did not even consider to recognize him as their supreme ruler. At an uncertain date after 1371, he became an Ottoman vassal. By 1377, significant parts of the territory he inherited from Vukašin were seized by other noblemen. King Marko in reality came to be a regional lord who ruled over a relatively small territory in western Macedonia. He funded the construction of the Monastery of Saint Demetrius near Skopje, better known as Marko's Monastery, finished in 1376. Marko lost his life on 17 May 1395, fighting on the Ottoman side against the Wallachians in the Battle of Rovine.
    Although he was a ruler of modest historical significance, Marko became a major character in South Slavic oral tradition. In Serbian epic poetry he is named Marko Kraljević, which is rendered as "Prince Marko" in English translations of the poetry; kraljević means "king's son". He is venerated as a national hero by the Serbs, Macedonians and Bulgarians, remembered in Balkan folklore as a fearless and powerful protector of the weak, who fought against injustice and confronted the Turks during the early years of Ottoman occupation.

    #396019

    Anonymous
    Quote:

    image

    I am interested in that picture. Is it actual reconstruction based on historical evidence or some kind of romantic vision of him?

    #396020

    Anonymous

    id say its a romantic picture. too much iron + hes shaved  ;D

    #396021

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    id say its a romantic picture. too much iron + hes shaved  ;D

    For a king i think it wouldn't be imposible to have so much iron. Bout shaved part i think he has beard except its small and blonde almost like skin color. ;D

    #396022

    Anonymous

    I found it on some historical site. He has the croatian knotwork and all that across his aprin/tabard. The men behind him are very historically accurate as for the Knez himself I don't know, I would say so. The King would have the best gear for sure.

    #396023

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    id say its a romantic picture. too much iron + hes shaved  ;D

    Absolutely, because Kings dress themselves like peasants
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