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  • #344729

    Anonymous

    Well I guess that now since I spend most of my time in Triest I felt compelled to open a thread about this.

    First of all I will start with linguistics.

    The Triestine would be the Italian dialect spoken in Triest. It is mutually intelligible with Italian (and easy to learn, I am actually a speaker of it), however since Triest area is a convergence of Italian, Germanic and Slavic cultures, it has many foreign influences and loanwords, I would concentrate here on the Slovene ones.

    I guess discernable Slovene elements could be found most easily in the phonetics. An example would be the word cossa ("thing"), here the double s is read as c (ts), clearly a Slovene influence as this feature is alien to other Italians. Also, the letter z is read like Slovene c, f. ex the counterpart to the Italian word cercare (to search) is written zercar (remember, they don't read it as z but as Slavs would read c).

    Yet another easy-to-detect Slovene influence would be the sound sc, the rest of the Italians read this as š, while Triestines read it as sč.
    And that would be it regarding phonetics.

    There are also a great number of loanwords, examples would be dolina, zima, piron… there are others. Here is the dictionary.

    Tbh you would expect more of it, however Triestines don't like very much their eastern neighbours and as such they try to eliminate Slavic influence wherever they can. The only thing they hate more than Slavs though are Furlans. They absolutely detest everything that is Furlan.

    [hr]

    The next thing that is worth to mention are Slovene toponyms. There are many if one takes a quick gloss over the map of Triest, however many have been lost due to Italianization policies of the fascists.

    Examples are Katinara, Kolonkovec, Škedenj, Rozzol, and there are others.
    More to it on this blog, there is a text if you scroll down, written in Slovene.

    Speaking of toponyms, in the suburb of Katinara there is also a Slovene school, built as early as 1791, which goes by the name of Sveti Ciril in Metod. It was running until 1927 (needless to say why), and then reopened after the war.

    It had roughly 1500 students at the beginning of XX.

    [hr]

    To conclude, I will quickly list some landmarks of Slovene culture in Triest.

    1861 – The Slavjanska Čitalnica was established
    1874 – The nationalistic association Edinost arose, followed up by the homonymous weekly newspaper
    1902 – Dramatično društvo v Trstu was established, which gave birth to Slovensko gledališče v Trstu in 1907.
    1907 – Narodni dom was built.
    1909 – Establishment of the Glasbena Matica.

    And that would be it. I will update this with more info as I see fit.

    Oh, one last thing…

    image

    #403949

    Anonymous

    Great thread. So they hate Furlans huh. Why? Then they are ignorant of their background (Tergestine). ;D

    #403950

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Great thread. So they hate Furlans huh. Why? Then they are ignorant of their background (Tergestine). ;D

    Well, maybe they hate them because they are actually educated of their own background? :D

    Tergestine was still spoken by the high classes until the 19th century, while Triestine was the language of the simple folk. So maybe if someone wanted to act uppity he would speak the former? :D Or they simply feel threatened by Furlan cultural elements (as they do with the Slavic ones), I really don't know.

    #403951

    Anonymous

    Another peculiarity of Slovenian culture in TS is the "Osmica". Osmica is the place where people make wines and other typical produce, and where they also sell it. They are scattered all over the Slovene Littoral and Vipavska area, but lately this custom has extended in other parts of the country.

    This practice dates to the time of Charlemagne, under whose law winegrowers were allowed to sell their products directly. We don't know how they fared during the middle ages, however this practice became protected by the royal decree of 1784, issued by his majesty Joseph II of HRE. This decree allowed Slovene winegrowers to sell their produce for a period of 8 days, and hence comes the name.

    Some pictures. Feast your eyes

    [table]
    [tr]
    [td][img width=200 height=200]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/ca/Frasca_di_osmizza_a_Samatorza.jpg” />[/td]
    [td][img width=200 height=200]http://blog.edreams.it/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/ossocollo-e-pancetta-osmize1.jpg” />[/td]
    [td][img width=200 height=200]http://www.avtobivak.net/thumbs/w=600$Najem%20avtodoma_osmica1.jpg” />[/td]
    [/tr]
    [/table]

    PS Note the bough hanged on the sign. If the bough is hanged, it means the Osmica is opened.

    #403952

    Anonymous

    Ooohhooo i would love be on osmica too. I heard of this. But haven't been on one yet since i am way out of those areas. :(  Pršut and Teran or Refošk. Great combo! :D

    #403953

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Ooohhooo i would love be on osmica too. I heard of this. But haven't been on one yet since i am way out of those areas. :(  Pršut and Teran or Refošk. Great combo! :D

    I remember going there as a kid, there is one in the Piran area iirc. The atmosphere is fantastic, and the food… well Primorci have very refined palate, so the food is amazing ofc :D

    Seriously you should visit Primorska more often. But oh well at least you have your žganci :P

    #403954

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I remember going there as a kid, there is one in the Piran area iirc. The atmosphere is fantastic, and the food… well Primorci have very refined palate, so the food is amazing ofc :D

    Seriously you should visit Primorska more often. But oh well at least you have your žganci :P

    Yes žganci are good too. :D Yeah i am not often in those areas but i often buy true Teran from some farmer whom my father knows well. So you are in Slovene Istra often? Anyway informative site about osmica's. There is general info about them plus info on when and where they will be at certain dates. Sadly only in Slovene language; http://www.osmice.info/ By the way i have seen that those Italians they are promoting Osmica's (Osmizza) too. Well thankfully some sites of theirs don't lie and admit it is Slovene; http://www.interware.it/tsr/ambiente/carso/osmizze.htm

    #403955

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Yes žganci are good too. :D Yeah i am not often in those areas but i often buy true Teran from some farmer whom my father knows well. So you are in Slovene Istra often?

    Until my grandad was alive I went there often, yeah. Now I drive through it several times a week :D

    Teran, yeah I know it well, we have it in western Istra. But I haven't tried "true" Teran :P It's kinda sour though, but it's a great combo with pršut, and ofc you can't miss some Istrski kozji sir.

    Quote:
    By the way i have seen that those Italians they are promoting Osmica's (Osmizza) too. Well thankfully some sites of theirs don't lie and admit it is Slovene; http://www.interware.it/tsr/ambiente/carso/osmizze.htm

    Well they can't still everything, can they? With them and Austrians stealing our food and drinks in tandem, it wouldn't surprise me if 20 years from now they presented us as barbarians whose cuisine through history was limited to wild berries and spring water.

    Though it's probably kinda hard to steal something named Osmica and pass it as Italian  :D

    However if you scroll down on the link you gave me you will find mostly Slovene names.

    #403956

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Until my grandad was alive I went there often, yeah. Now I drive through it several times a week :D

    Several times a week is alot. :D

    Quote:
    However if you scroll down on the link you gave me you will find mostly Slovene names.

    This can't be can it? 😮 I mean surely those cannot be some ščavi names. Those must be ancient Italic names. Ancestors of Roman coloni. ;D

    #403957

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    This can't be can it? 😮 I mean surely those cannot be some ščavi names. Those must be ancient Italic names. Ancestors of Roman coloni. ;D

    Ja, malo jodi ve, da so člani prvega rimskega triumvirata bili Pompej Veliki, Mark Kras, ino Gaji Julij Janez.

    #403958

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Ja, malo jodi ve, da so člani prvega rimskega triumvirata bili Pompej Veliki, Mark Kras, ino Gaji Julij Janez.

    Res je! Viva la Roman, read Slovenet imperium! ;D

    #350515

    Anonymous

    “cossa (“thing”), here the double s is read as c (ts)”
    Isn’t the ss read as s though? As far as I know this was adopted from the venetian language, since they say “cossa” (pron. “kosa”) and not the standard italian “cosa” (pron. “koza”). Maybe I missed something but I’ve never heard a triestine say “kotsa”.

    “the sound sc, the rest of the Italians read this as š, while Triestines read it as sč”
    I’ve never noticed this, maybe you meant s’c which is pronounced šč, like in the infamous “s’ciavi” (ščavi)?

    I know this is an old topic but I’m really interested in Triest and its history and customs so I just couldn’t resist.

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