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  • #343827

    Anonymous

    Slovenian language is very diverse in his dialects. There are 48 considered Slovene dialects and subdialects. They are classified in 7 dialectual groups. Those are Upper Carniolian (dark green), Lower Carniolian (light green), Styrian (orange), Pannonian (yellow), Carinthian (red), Littoral (blue) and Rovte (purple).
    image
    As you can easily notice while looking at the picture is that Slovene dialects are spoken also outside the state border. That's because Slovenian minorities live there (they were majorities once though). Those dialects are influenced by several neighbouring languages such as Italian, Friulian, German (mostly), Croatian and Hungarian. Deviations betven dialects can be so big, speakers of different dialects may have problems understand each other. For example, a person from Littoral can have major problems while speaking to sombody from Prekmurje in dialects. But there is a solution: standard Slovene. Only problem is nobody really uses it. :) Though it's beeing used on TV, radio, other media and in public, ordinary people mostly dont use it all the time (myself almost never, only while speaking to an official person). Thats why foreigners have problems to understand Slovenes who talk in their dialects. It's hard enough to learn Standard Slovene only to realise noone on the street uses it.

    I can show you best with writing an example. (but I dont wind any smart sentence…) Also I can't give examples of all dialects as I don't know them very well. That's why I will use only some.

    English: I had beaten a boy and took all his money

    Standard Slovene: Pretepel sem dečka in mu vzel ves denar.

    Srednještajerski dialect: Preteipu s'm pjeba no mu vzel vies dnar.

    Srednjesavinjski dialect: Pretepu s'm poba in mu vzel vs dnar.

    Južnopohorski dialect: Pretepu s'm pubeca, te pa sm mu vzel vés gnar.

    Ljubljanski subdialect: Prətépu s'm fanta in mu vzel vs dənar.

    Here are no obvious differences, as I didn't make examples of the bada*s dialects. Povhec can make some of his dialect (and any others if you know them).

    For the end, I'd like to ask you all if you had any experience talking to Slovenes who were using their dialect. Did you had trouble understanding them? Where were you in that time (which part of SLO – if it's no big secret)? I'm interested to hear about. :)

    #392270

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    For the end, I'd like to ask you all if you had any experience talking to Slovenes who were using their dialect. Did you had trouble understanding them? Where were you in that time (which part of SLO – if it's no big secret)? I'm interested to hear about. :)

    I wrote in my dialect here several times and most of them don't have a clue. Problem is they try to use google translate which of no use. :D

    #392271

    Anonymous

    Istra dialect – Stuka san dečka I uza mu sve šolde

    Buzeština, which is the closest to Slovene (and is also the dialect of my grandpa), would be the following – Tuč (dunno the past tense) suom fanta i prejel/zel mu dnar.

    Btw, couldn't you find a more violent and gory example?  ::)  ;D

    #392272

    Anonymous

    It is astonishing how many different Slovenian dialects exist.
    In Carinthia the Slovenian speakers use mainly Windisch and often mix it with German.
    They use sentences like: Mi gremo spazirati  ;D

    #392273

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Btw, couldn't you find a more violent and gory example?  ::)  ;D

    I don't find it gory. :)

    Quote:
    It is astonishing how many different Slovenian dialects exist.
    In Carinthia the Slovenian speakers use mainly Windisch and often mix it with German.
    They use sentences like: Mi gremo spazirati  ;D

    Mate i dunno what you mean by they speak Windisch but this is archaic term for Slovene/Slavic. There was land called Windisch Mark in area of modern central-south Slovenia. I can understand your folk better than Prekmurci. :D Apart from some more special words ofc. Usage of German or Slovenised German words is typical for all Slovene lands even Bela Krajna. :D

    http://bos.zrc-sazu.si/cgi/neva.exe?name=ssbsj&tch=14&expression=zs%3D72376

    #392274

    Anonymous

    Yea, that's true.

    Quote:
    Btw, couldn't you find a more violent and gory example?  ::)  ;D

    Hehe, Štajerci would say "Aufbiks, čreve na plot!"

    I had problems understanding Kozjanski dialect when I was a child and I still have them with Prekmurščina and some fu**** up Primorski dialects. I also remember i couldn't understand Kajkavian dialect when I was small. Today there's no problem with that as understand most of Croatian/Bosnian/Serbian today.

    But I must say I'm quite dissapointed about no foreigners responsed to this exept Corvus (I don't count you as a foreigner, Carniolian). It means noone had problems with our dialects or bloody noone had read this thread!  :( Sad…

    #392275

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Hehe, Štajerci would say "Aufbiks, čreve na plot!"

    <br /;D” title=”>;D” class=”bbcode_smiley” />

    Quote:
    But I must say I'm quite dissapointed about no foreigners responsed to this exept Corvus (I don't count you as a foreigner, Carniolian). It means noone had problems with our dialects or bloody noone had read this thread!  :( Sad…

    Actualy i don't think many of them have heard dialects or even have been here and if they were here they probably spoke with Slovenes in English.

    #392276

    Anonymous

    Croats speak English?!  ;D I'm joking of course! ;) Sure some have been in Slovenia! Some Croatians or Serbs or Bosnians or anybody. And I bet Svaetoslava will visit us once. :) I have been in quite few European states. I even speak some German dialects for that matters…

    #392277

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Croats speak English?!  ;D I'm joking of course! ;) Sure some have been in Slovenia! Some Croatians or Serbs or Bosnians or anybody.

    About other south's i agree that some might have been but they have probably heard dialect with heavy influence of standard. :D

    Btw what is šrtuzl? I don't know that one! ;D

    #392278

    Anonymous

    Škrt človek = Škrtuzl/Škrtavz or sth like that. We consider Gorenjci and Savinjčani also as being "škrti". ;) You know that yourself. :) Though it is not true (I know it) we can't stop joking about it. Others consider us as drunks as far as I know.

    #392279

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Though it is not true (I know it) we can't stop joking about it. Others consider us as drunks as far as I know.

    How can you be so sure? :D Well seriously i don't know how šrtuzl are we but i would say that my family is fairly šrtuzl. Altho nothing serious. :)

    As far as Styrians goes we consider you people (at least in my area) as folks of fighting spirit. Ofc. we differate you regionaly to some degree. For example Šmarnca is believed to be widely consumed in Haloze. :D

    #392280

    Anonymous

    Well, with being Štajerc is a problem. We all say we are Štejerci but you are a Savinčan, Pohorc, Podravc, Prlek, Kozjanc, itd first, secont you are Štajerc. There are also big differences in our dialects. Most "normal" is the subdialect of Celje (which I speak also). The iconic "Štajerščina" is the way they speak in Maribor: "Čuj, ka si te vido, kak je te oniga tam vbrisalo po tlehi, ne?" or "Čuj, púbec, te pa pridi sém; ka bi se te rad tépo?" or known from 24ur "Pa sn vído, kak je en kuža ofce jédo. Puno je blo mrtvih. Jokat sn se začel."
    Savinjski dialects are the closest to Gorenjski and Zasavski and don't really sound Štajersko. On the other hand dialects from Šaleška dolina seem to be influenced by Koroški dialects. In Podravska regija and Prlekija they seem more close with Prekmurščina. Kozjanski dialects are a little bit influenced by Croatian but very weak though. Srednještajerski (Šentjur, Sl. Konjice, Dramlje, Šmarje) and Južnopohorski (Maribor, Sl. Bistrica, Fram) dialects seem to be the "most" Styrian or at least that's my point of view.

    #392281

    Anonymous

    I see thanks for info. Well considering this we have similar situation. Notranska, Gorenska and Dolenska were part of Krajnska in Slovenska Krajna but folks dont feel like we have common identity like they used to do. Which means it is unlike Štajerska where feeling of belonging to Štajerska at least still exist. Main reason for this probably that Dolensko, Gorensko and Notransko dialects are fundamentally different.

    Then we also clearly are funny enough to differ Gorenska, etc. too. For example many younger folks think Gorenska only starts from Komenda onward towards Bled. ;D

    In reality Kamnik, Domžale, Moravče and even most of Lublana are part of Gorenska and its dialect range. Considering dialects i think that Gorensko narečje is in reality more differated than some linguists say. Folks from north of Kamnik speak different from Tuhinj valley. Kranj is yet bit different while Bled, Jesenice, Kranjska Gora are yet bit more different. Ofc. differences are smaller than those of Štajerska. :D

    #392282

    Anonymous

    I guess so. At my place even the same dialect isn't the same everywhere. For example Srednještajerski dialect. In Šentjur "veš da" is called "vejžde" in Sevnica "väjžde" and in Šmarje "vajžde" or "želejs" and "želajs". Stuff like that. I usually speal Celjski govor or Srednještajerski dialect, sometimes Srednjesavinjski dialect. Depends on with who I speak. I cna speak in Južnopohorski too but I use it only when I make fun of somebody or for telling some jokes. I live now in the area where Srednještajerski is spoken, before that I lived in Celje and I still mostly speak that govor but with some friends I just switch to Srednjesavinjski automatically without even thinking. :) Funny?

    #392283

    Anonymous

    Yeah it is realy interesting how things are diverse. :D Concerning my dialect area. I would say our dialects have survived the least since standard Slovene bila is here bva for example. This is called švapanje. Using this style of speech sounds very alien too many today. In old times teachers were mocking folks who spoke in švapanje. This caused the reaction and now even many common folk especially younger often make fun of people who speak so. Altho švapanje itself isn't completely vanished because even those who make fun of those people n reality speak it on half too.

    I also have seen that at least dialect of my grandmothers uses jena for number one unlike ena. However this jena is pronounced in reality jəna there are also other special elements in this sub-dialects which sound rather un-Gorensko altho in general this sub-dialect is more or less Gorensko style. I don't think other Gorenci use this altho i am not 100% sure. How do you say ena in your areas?

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