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  • #342350

    Anonymous

    The Slovak koruna

    or Slovak crown (Slovak: slovenská koruna, literally meaning Slovak crown) was the currency of Slovakia between 8 February 1993 and 31 December 2008, and could be used for cash payment until the 16 January 2009. It is no longer the official Slovak currency. The ISO 4217 code was SKK and the local abbreviation was Sk. The Slovak crown (koruna) was also the currency of the WWII Slovak Republic between 1939 and 1945. Both korunas were subdivided into 100 haliers (abbreviated as "hal." or simply "h", singular: halier).

    Slovakia switched its currency from the koruna to the euro on 1 January 2009, at a rate of 30.1260 korunas to the euro.

    In the Slovak language, the nouns "koruna" and "halier" both assume two plural forms. "Koruny" and "haliere" appears after the numbers 2, 3 and 4 and in generic (uncountable) context, with "korún" and "halierov" being used after other numbers. The latter forms also correspond to genitive use in plural.

    WWII koruna

    The koruna (Slovak: koruna slovenská, note the different word ordering from the modern koruna) was the currency of the Slovak Republic from 1939 to 1945. The Slovak koruna replaced the Czechoslovak koruna at par and was replaced by the reconstituted Czechoslovak koruna, again at par. Its abbreviation was Kčs.

    Initially, the Slovak koruna was at par with the Bohemian and Moravian koruna, with 10 korunas = 1 Reichsmark. This was changed, on 1 October 1940, to a rate of 11.62 Slovak korunas = 1 Reichsmark, with the value of the Bohemian and Moravian currency unchanged against the Reichsmark.

    Modern koruna

    In 1993, the newly independent Slovakia introduced its own koruna, replacing the Czechoslovak koruna at par.

    Coins

    In 1993, coins were introduced in denominations of 10, 20 and 50 haliers, 1, 2, 5 and 10 korunas. The 10 and 20 halier coins were taken out of circulation on 31 December 2003.

    The obverse of the coins feature the Coat of Arms of Slovakia, with motifs from Slovak history on the reverses.

    10 h – Octagonal wooden belfry from Zemplín (early 19th century A.D.) = 0.0033 €
    image

    20 h – the Kriváň peak in the High Tatras = 0.0066 €
    image

    50 h – Renaissance polygonal tower of Devín Castle = 0.0166 €
    image

    1 Sk – Gothic wooden sculpture of the Madonna with child (A.D. 1500) = 0.0332 €
    image

    2 Sk – Earthen sculpture of the sitting Venus of Hradok (4th millennium B.C.) = 0.0664 €
    image

    5 Sk – Reverse of a Celtic coin of Biatec (1st century B.C.)-0,17 Euro = 0.166 €
    image

    10 Sk – Bronze cross (11th century A.D.) = 0.332 €
    image

    Coins can be exchanged at the National Bank of Slovakia for euros until December 31, 2013.

    Banknotes

    In 1993, banknotes were issued in denominations of 20, 50, 100, 500 and 1000 korún. These were produced by affixing stamps bearing the arms of Slovakia and the denomination to Czechoslovak banknotes.

    Later in 1993, regular type banknotes were introduced in the same denominations, with 5000 korún notes added in 1994 and 200 korún added in 1995. The main motifs on the obverses of the banknotes represent important people living in the territory of the present Slovakia in various historical eras. On the reverses, these motifs are completed by depicting places where these people lived and were active.

    20 SK – Prince Pribina, Nitra Castle (9th century A.D.) = 0.66 €
    image

    50 Sk – Saint Cyril and Saint Methodius, Dražovce church and Glagolitic alphabet (9th century A.D.) = 1.66 €
    image

    100 Sk – Madonna at Levoča church, Levoča church and city hall (14th century A.D.) = 3.32 €
    image
    image

    200 Sk – Anton Bernolák, Trnava (18th century) = 6.64 €
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    500 Sk – Ľudovít Štúr, Bratislava Castle (19th century) = 16.60 €
    image

    1000 Sk – Andrej Hlinka, Ružomberok church (19th – 20th century) = 33.19 €
    image

    5000 Sk – Milan Rastislav Štefánik, Stefanik's grave (20th century) = 165.97 €
    image

    There was a discussion about 2000 Sk which was never introduced. Dr. Jozef Tiso, a president of Slovak Republic during the WW2 was said to be on the obverse of the banknote. Then Slovakia changed the currency to Euro.
    image

    I personally would love to revert to the former currency, but unfortunately representatives of Slovakia were so foolish that they destroyed all banknotes (while Germany keep their Marks in deposits!).  >:(

    #366265

    Anonymous

    The European Central Bank grew a new tentacle with the absorption of Slovakia into its mass. The fact that old SKK notes were destroyed is very bad as it makes Slovakia 100% dependent on the Euro, while Germany can potentially pull out and has its old notes that can once again start to circulate.

    It is not that the Euro is bad in of itself… but it is how it is managed. Financially speaking, national sovereignty is close to fading away totally. Regions become assets and assets are shuffled to make profit. A thousand years of history may be nice, but it won't earn the bankers money, so they disregard it.

    #366266

    Anonymous

    Banknotes of wartime Slovak republic (1939-1945). I like the 50 Ks banknote the most.

    5 Ks – 1945
    [img width=700 height=337]http://www.mojazbierka.sk/imgcache/i-obj-149-4-800-600–.jpg”/>
    [img width=700 height=340]http://www.mojazbierka.sk/imgcache/i-obj-150-4-800-600–.jpg”/>

    10 Ks – 1939
    [img width=700 height=339]http://www.mojazbierka.sk/imgcache/i-obj-155-4-800-600–.jpg”/>
    [img width=700 height=336]http://www.mojazbierka.sk/imgcache/i-obj-152-4-800-600–.jpg”/>

    10 Ks – 1943
    [img width=700 height=330]http://www.mojazbierka.sk/imgcache/i-obj-166-4-800-600–.jpg”/>
    [img width=700 height=333]http://www.mojazbierka.sk/imgcache/i-obj-165-4-800-600–.jpg”/>

    20 Ks – 1939
    [img width=700 height=347]http://www.mojazbierka.sk/imgcache/i-obj-167-4-800-600–.jpg”/>
    [img width=700 height=344]http://www.mojazbierka.sk/imgcache/i-obj-168-4-800-600–.jpg”/>

    20 Ks – 1942
    [img width=700 height=329]http://www.mojazbierka.sk/imgcache/i-obj-169-4-800-600–.jpg”/>
    [img width=700 height=333]http://www.mojazbierka.sk/imgcache/i-obj-171-4-800-600–.jpg”/>

    50 Ks – 1940
    [img width=700 height=372]http://www.mojazbierka.sk/imgcache/i-obj-174-4-800-600–.jpg”/>
    [img width=700 height=375]http://www.mojazbierka.sk/imgcache/i-obj-176-4-800-600–.jpg”/>

    100 Ks – 1940
    [img width=700 height=408]http://www.mojazbierka.sk/imgcache/i-obj-177-4-800-600–.jpg”/>
    [img width=700 height=399]http://www.mojazbierka.sk/imgcache/i-obj-178-4-800-600–.jpg”/>

    500 Ks – 1941
    [img width=700 height=323]http://www.mojazbierka.sk/imgcache/i-obj-183-4-800-600–.jpg”/>
    [img width=700 height=323]http://www.mojazbierka.sk/imgcache/i-obj-180-4-800-600–.jpg”/>

    1000 Ks – 1940
    [img width=700 height=327]http://www.mojazbierka.sk/imgcache/i-obj-187-4-800-600–.jpg”/>
    [img width=700 height=329]http://www.mojazbierka.sk/imgcache/i-obj-186-4-800-600–.jpg”/>

    5000 Ks
    image

    #366267

    Anonymous

    Beautiful notes. Why do the Euros look so boring? With all of the years of European history and civilization they could have came up with better designs. Even American money looks better and they only have a few hundred years of history.

    #366268

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Beautiful notes. Why do the Euros look so boring? With all of the years of European history and civilization they could have came up with better designs. Even American money looks better and they only have a few hundred years of history.

    Because boring Euro banknotes represent boring liberal European Union and its boring bureaucracy  ;)  You can't imagine verbal attacks of various liberals when Slovakia introduced its Euro coins (states using Euro can design own Euro coins). They saw a problem in the double-cross – in their opinions it is backward, nationalistic, thus not suitable for modern European Union. Such lames.  ::)

    image

    #366269

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Because boring Euro banknotes represent boring liberal European Union and its boring bureaucracy  ;)

    Couldn't tell it better.

    Quote:
    You can't imagine verbal attacks of various liberals when Slovakia introduced its Euro coins (states using Euro can design own Euro coins). They saw a problem in the double-cross – in their opinions it is backward, nationalistic, thus not suitable for modern European Union. Such lames.  ::)

    A few years ago I bought something to eat in a company cantina. I payed and got some coins back. When I saw the coins I was shocked:

    image

    At first I thought it was a joke and then I looked into my wallet.. it was full of these ridiculous coins..

    Here is another one:

    image #366270


    Anonymous

    Did Slovaks feel that they were short changed on the value of their currency when they had to switch to the euro?

    #366271

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    A few years ago I bought something to eat in a company cantina. I payed and got some coins back. When I saw the coins I was shocked:

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/de/thumb/2/29/2_Euro_WWU_%C3%96sterreich_2009.jpg/600px-2_Euro_WWU_%C3%96sterreich_2009.jpg

    At first I thought it was a joke and then I looked into my wallet.. it was full of these ridiculous coins..

    When these coins appeared in Slovakia, a friend of mine got confused and went to the bank to inform the staff that he got a fake coin and asked there what he should do in this situation. The bank staff were also a bit confused but after a call to the National bank of Slovakia they found out that the coin wasn't fake.. that weird thing on it was just a different expression of West European art. Ha ha. :)

    #366272

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    When these coins appeared in Slovakia, a friend of mine got confused and went to the bank to inform the staff that he got a fake coin and asked there what he should do in this situation. The bank staff were also a bit confused but after a call to the National bank of Slovakia they found out that the coin wasn't fake.. that weird thing on it was just a different expression of West European art. Ha ha. :)

    These weird things are called memorial coins. Many EURO using states make them every couple of years. For anniversaries and such stuff. They're usually 2 E coins and sometimes 1 E coins. It's not a bad idea, actually. :) Let's made an example. Slovakia makes such a coin with Milan Ratislav Štefánik. The coin makes his way to Slovenia after some time. Then I get it. I like the picture of an army guy on the coin. I even notice the inscription in the back! :D But I have no bloody idea who that guy is… :- So search on Google and get to know a thing more about our "soimenjaki". And both sides are happy. :)

    Anyway, nice thread. :) Gave me the inspiration to make a similar one for us.

    #366273

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Did Slovaks feel that they were short changed on the value of their currency when they had to switch to the euro?

    Yes, we were in general. I had 300 Koruna and suddenly I got 10 € … and believe or not, 10 € is much easier to spend than 300 Koruna.

    Quote:
    These weird things are called memorial coins. Many EURO using states make them every couple of years. For anniversaries and such stuff. They're usually 2 E coins and sometimes 1 E coins. It's not a bad idea, actually. :) Let's made an example. Slovakia makes such a coin with Milan Ratislav Štefánik. The coin makes his way to Slovenia after some time. Then I get it. I like the picture of an army guy on the coin. I even notice the inscription in the back! :D But I have no bloody idea who that guy is… :- So search on Google and get to know a thing more about our "soimenjaki". And both sides are happy. :)

    Anyway, nice thread. :) Gave me the inspiration to make a similar one for us.

    I'm not saying it's a bad idea, I'm just saying that a little figure of something holding € is ugly.

    #366274

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I'm not saying it's a bad idea, I'm just saying that a little figure of something holding € is ugly.

    Yeah that coin is funny as hell. I guess it is some kids work. But on the other hand it could be alternative art. ;D

    #366275

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Yeah that coin is funny as hell. I guess it is some kids work. But on the other hand it could be alternative art. ;D

    Yeah, new modern European art haha

    #366276

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Yes, we were in general. I had 300 Koruna and suddenly I got 10 € … and believe or not, 10 € is much easier to spend than 300 Koruna.

    I'm not saying it's a bad idea, I'm just saying that a little figure of something holding € is ugly.

    I can tell you the same about our former Tolar. If you had 2000 SIT you had something, but with 10 E you don't…

    What did you expect, afterall Jodlars made it. The only thing they're good in is … emm, I forgot it…

    #366277

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Here is another one:

    image

    Cultureless one-world-stupidity = modernity

    I wanted to post this pic.. :)

    Quote:
    These weird things are called memorial coins. Many EURO using states make them every couple of years. For anniversaries and such stuff. They're usually 2 E coins and sometimes 1 E coins. It's not a bad idea, actually. :) Let's made an example. Slovakia makes such a coin with Milan Ratislav Štefánik. The coin makes his way to Slovenia after some time. Then I get it. I like the picture of an army guy on the coin. I even notice the inscription in the back! :D But I have no bloody idea who that guy is… :- So search on Google and get to know a thing more about our "soimenjaki". And both sides are happy. :)

    Yes, this would be an example of a good memorial coin. But before making ridiculous kindergarten-coins, we shouldn't make any memorial coins.

    Quote:
    Yeah that coin is funny as hell. I guess it is some kids work. But on the other hand it could be alternative art. ;D

    I think it is entartete kunst.

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