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  • #345917

    Anonymous
    I am the good shepherd.  The good shepherd gives His life for the sheep.

    (John 10:11)

    O Lord, make this man also, who has been proclaimed a steward of the episcopal grace, to be an imitator of You, the true Shepherd, who laid down Your life for Your sheep…

    (Prayer of Consecration of a Bishop)

    On September 25, 1921, these words were prayed over Father Gorazd Pavlik as he was consecrated the Bishop of Moravia and Silesia.  It is doubtful that anyone in attendance that day, including the new bishop, expected that he would be called upon to live that prayer in a literal way.

    [img height=232 width=148]http://www.acrod.org/assets/images/readingroomimages/Bishop_Gorazd.jpg”/>Matthias Pavlik was born in 1879 in the Moravian town of Hrubavrbka in what would later become the Czech Republic.  He was born into a Roman Catholic family, completed the Roman Catholic seminary in Olomouc and was ordained a priest.  With the end of World War I and the formation of the new nation of Czechoslovakia from the ruins of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the laws requiring observance of the Catholic religion were loosened.  Father Matthias, along with thousands of others left the Catholic Church with many seeking a home in the Orthodox Church, which in that region was then under the protection of the Orthodox Church of Serbia.  Taking monastic vows, he assumed the name of “Gorazd” who was a disciple of Sts. Cyril and Methodius and who succeeded St. Methodius as the bishop of Moravia.  At the age of 42, Father Gorazd was consecrated an Orthodox bishop in Belgrade Serbia by the Serbian Patriarch Dimitri along with the illustrious Metropolitan Anthony Khrapovitsky of Kiev and several other bishops including Bishop Dositheus of Zagreb.  Bishop Dositheus was a key figure in the re-birth of the Orthodox Church among Carpatho-Rusyns and was glorified as a saint of the Orthodox Church in May, 2000. 

    Bishop Gorazd immediately set to work building up the Orthodox Faith, building eleven churches and two chapels, translating service books into the Czech language.  He paid particular attention to the Carpatho-Rusyns in the eastern part of the Czech Republic who were also returning to the Orthodox Faith of their ancestors.  In that region, in 1934 he took part in the 20th anniversary commemoration of the Marmarosh-Sigotsky trial.  This trial occurred in 1914 when 94 Carpatho-Rusyn Orthodox together with their priest, St. Alexis Kabaluk were tried for treason for renouncing the Greek Catholic Faith and embracing Orthodoxy. 

    For twenty years, the bishop faithfully cared for his flock as a good shepherd.  He remained faithful to the Orthodox Faith despite attempts by many Catholics to persuade him to renounce Orthodoxy.  When many Roman Catholic priests rose up against him, the Catholic Bishop Stoian said:  Leave Pavlik alone, you are not worthy to tie his laces, it would be good if everyone were like Pavlik. 

    When the German Nazis invaded and conquered Czechoslovakia in 1938, the Orthodox Church was placed under the Orthodox metropolitan of Berlin, Germany, Metropolitan Seraphim (Liade).  The German ruler of Czechoslovakia was Reinhard Heydrich, was assassinated on May 27, 1942 by a group of Czech resistance fighters who then were allowed to hide in the crypt of Sts. Cyril and Methodius Orthodox Cathedral.  When Bishop Gorazd learned of this he realized what great danger he and his flock were in if the Nazis uncovered this hiding place.  Before leaving for Berlin to take part in the consecration of Father Philip Gardner as a bishop, he insisted that the resistance fighters leave the Cathedral and find another place of refuge.  But on June 18, the hiding place was revealed after a betrayal and torture, and all members of the group were killed. 

    The Nazis immediately began massive reprisals.  The two Cathedral priests and senior lay officials were arrested.  Bishop Gorazd, trying to save his people and his church from destruction, wrote letters to the Nazi authorities taking the blame for the actions in the Cathedral:

    I am giving myself up to the authorities and am prepared to face any punishment, including death.

    Bishop Gorazd was arrested on June 27, 1942, tortured and executed by firing squad at the Kobylisz Shooting Range on September 4.  He was 63 years old.  The two Cathedral priests were also shot.  Along with the priests and bishop, a total of 550 people were executed by the Nazis in reprisal for the assassination.  In one particularly heinous act, the entire village of Lidice was exterminated.  All of the men were executed, the women and children placed in labor camps, and all village dwellings destroyed.  Following the martyrdom of the bishop, the Orthodox Church in Bohemia and Moravia was suppressed and all churches closed.  Orthodox priests were exiled to forced labor camps in Germany. 

    Because Bishop Gorazd willingly laid down his life in order to protect his flock, he was recognized by the Orthodox Church of Serbia as a new martyr on May 4, 1961.  On August 24, 1987 he was glorified in the Cathedral of St. Gorazd in Olomouc Moravia.  His feastday is observed on the day of his martyrdom, September 4.  Today, at the site of his martyrdom at the Kobylisz Shooting Range, a monument has been erected in his memory and those others who suffered at the hands of the Nazis.

    – Father Edward Pehanich

    image

    #423200

    Anonymous

    Nice post, Ashley. :)

    #423201

    Anonymous

    Thanks, Dalibor! :)

    #423202

    Anonymous

    When I saw the name I thought he was Slovene. But he is not … :)

    #423203

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    When I saw the name I thought he was Slovene. But he is not … :)

    He was Czech Catholic priest who converted to Orthodoxy, with many other Czechs. You could read it at Ashle's post, but there is one mistake :P Dositej was not bishop, but Metropolitan of Zagreb. :P  (Well, pedantic Church Historian is my second name).
    Anyway, name Gorazd is really popular in Slovenia :)

    #423204

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    He was Czech Catholic priest who converted to Orthodoxy, with many other Czechs. You could read it at Ashle's post, but there is one mistake :P Dositej was not bishop, but Metropolitan of Zagreb. :P  (Well, pedantic Church Historian is my second name).
    Anyway, name Gorazd is really popular in Slovenia :)

    I know, but I asumed he was … The name is quite popular here, it kind of is known as a Slovene name actually.

    #423205

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I know, but I asumed he was … The name is quite popular here, it kind of is known as a Slovene name actually.

    First Gorazd we know about, was Saint Cyrill and Methoidus' disciple. He was from Moravia or maybe Panonia. After Latin priests took prevailance in Moravia, 5 of Slavic Apostles disciples went in Bulgaria. Gorazd was among them. He got canonized in Orthodox Church, and thats how St Gorazd of Czechia got name. Every Orthodox monk change name when taking vows, in honour of some saint. :)

    #423206

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    First Gorazd we know about, was Saint Cyrill and Methoidus' disciple. He was from Moravia or maybe Panonia. After Latin priests took prevailance in Moravia, 5 of Slavic Apostles disciples went in Bulgaria. Gorazd was among them. He got canonized in Orthodox Church, and thats how St Gorazd of Czechia got name. Every Orthodox monk change name when taking vows, in honour of some saint. :)

    Because there was a knez of Carantania called Borut and his son, who succeeded him, was Gorazd. That was around 750 or so …

    #423207

    Anonymous

    What do you guys think of a female version of this for a "Christian name"?  I'm not sure if I have to pick one or not, the priest hasn't specifically said, but my current name isn't "Christian", so I thought another Czech who joined the Orthodox Church would be kinda cool.

    #423208

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    What do you guys think of a female version of this for a "Christian name"?  I'm not sure if I have to pick one or not, the priest hasn't specifically said, but my current name isn't "Christian", so I thought another Czech who joined the Orthodox Church would be kinda cool.

    Nice, but wouldn't you be "Gorazdina" or something then? ;D

    #423209

    Anonymous

    In the modern Russian Orthodox Church in America, no new saints' names are bestowed, which is different from the Catholic Church. In olden days, Russian Orthodox first names came from the Calendar of Saints and Feasts and were bestowed by the priest at the time of baptism. Also, the more a family was able to pay the priest, the more likely a good name would be selected.  Nowadays, of course, parents choose the name.

    A personal example: my grandfather wanted my name to be Olga, who is a major saint on my birth date — Julian Calendar, of course. My parents disagreed.  :P

    #423210

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    In the modern Russian Orthodox Church in America, no new saints' names are bestowed, which is different from the Catholic Church. In olden days, Russian Orthodox first names came from the Calendar of Saints and Feasts and were bestowed by the priest at the time of baptism. Also, the more a family was able to pay the priest, the more likely a good name would be selected.  Nowadays, of course, parents choose the name.

    A personal example: my grandfather wanted my name to be Olga, who is a major saint on my birth date — Julian Calendar, of course. My parents disagreed.  :P

    Here always the family picked the name. The birthday wasn't important, you only shouldn't "go back" for a name – not pick a name of a sint who's name day had already passed in the year. That was supposed to bring bad luck in life. Then they celebrated only the name day. They tend to say  that everyone has a birthday but not all have name days.

    #423211

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    What do you guys think of a female version of this for a "Christian name"?  I'm not sure if I have to pick one or not, the priest hasn't specifically said, but my current name isn't "Christian", so I thought another Czech who joined the Orthodox Church would be kinda cool.

    I ont have Christian name either, and I am theologian :P and future priest. I dont know, it was not strict requirement, thats how we have names like Plato etc in calendary, when somebody with that name, got canon ized, he become saint, and name become "Christian". Anyway, if you want some name of saint with Czech tradition, take Lyudmila. :) That was name of Czech princess. :)

    Quote:
    In the modern Russian Orthodox Church in America, no new saints' names are bestowed, which is different from the Catholic Church.

    Hmmmm, there are new people canonized in all jurisdictions lol. You confused somethink, I believe.

    #423212

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    In the modern Russian Orthodox Church in America, no new saints' names are bestowed, which is different from the Catholic Church. In olden days, Russian Orthodox first names came from the Calendar of Saints and Feasts and were bestowed by the priest at the time of baptism. Also, the more a family was able to pay the priest, the more likely a good name would be selected.  Nowadays, of course, parents choose the name.

    A personal example: my grandfather wanted my name to be Olga, who is a major saint on my birth date — Julian Calendar, of course. My parents disagreed.  :P

    If we did it based on dates, it would be awkward – people joining later in life here usually do it on a set date, sometimes Pentecost, though this priest prefers Great Saturday.  I'm pretty sure I won't be the only one coming into the Church that day.

    Quote:
    Here always the family picked the name. The birthday wasn't important, you only shouldn't "go back" for a name – not pick a name of a sint who's name day had already passed in the year. That was supposed to bring bad luck in life. Then they celebrated only the name day. They tend to say  that everyone has a birthday but not all have name days.

    If I did that, it should work out so that the name day would be about 4 months after joining the Church.  :)  I don't need the potential for more bad luck!

    BTW – I really like the ring of Gorazdina :D  I'm not sure if that's the definitive female version (?), but I hope it is  8)

    Quote:
    I ont have Christian name either, and I am theologian :P  and future priest. I dont know, it was not strict requirement, thats how we have names like Plato etc in calendary, when somebody with that name, got canon ized, he become saint, and name become "Christian". Anyway, if you want some name of saint with Czech tradition, take Lyudmila. :) That was name of Czech princess. :)

    Ooo that's a good one, too :)  Are you really studying to be a priest?  That's awesome if so. 

    I know some priests here require converts to pick a Christian name if they don't have one already, though honestly, I probably wouldn't use it except for what I have to.  I like my name :D

    #423213

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    If we did it based on dates, it would be awkward – people joining later in life here usually do it on a set date, sometimes Pentecost, though this priest prefers Great Saturday.  I'm pretty sure I won't be the only one coming into the Church that day.

    If I did that, it should work out so that the name day would be about 4 months after joining the Church.  :)  I don't need the potential for more bad luck!

    Well, people here get baptized as Children, so name they got from parents is their baptizmal name too. In anceitn days, there was tradition of baptism on Great Saturday, in fact lent had lot to do with process of preparation of ancient Katechumens for baptism. (I mean not generaly with fasting, but lets say, preperational fasting for Catechumens merged with old fast before Pascha)

    Quote:

    BTW – I really like the ring of Gorazdina :D  I'm not sure if that's the definitive female version (?), but I hope it is  8)

    I guess it is, but not sure if there was not some Gorazdina in Menaion. :D

    Quote:
    Ooo that's a good one, too :)  Are you really studying to be a priest? 

    Nope, I allready studied :P I graduated, did postgraduate etc :D I am waiting for ordination, and in meantime teaching Religous education. :)

    Quote:
    I know some priests here require converts to pick a Christian name if they don't have one already, though honestly, I probably wouldn't use it except for what I have to.  I like my name :D

    It was law in Medieval Russia, all children had to be baptized under names from menaion, tough it was not general practice. In Greece some priests insist on names from Menaion, some are respecting choice of parents. In Serbia, Bulgaria and other countries there was never special requirements.

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