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  • #343459

    Anonymous

    Dont know if this is made up or not but according to this site some Croatian dialects have many Iranian words + some oriental words. This is just abstract of the text;

    Old-Croat language (origins, evolution and eradication of original Croatian): One presents the historical development of the original Croatian language before Yugoslavia, and the abundance of Indo-Iranian archaisms in Croatian rural dialects. These archaic dialects formerly were spoken in larger areas of eastern Adriatic coast, but then by the Turkish invasion they were pressed in the actual residual refugia, and recently they were not studied and are abandoned to extinction. Among the northern Kaykavian dialects of Pannonia, the most abundant Indo-Iranian archaisms are conserved in the Baegnjunska tongue of northern Zagorje county. The southern Chakavian dialects in Adriatic coast and islands include even more Indo-Iranian and some Mesopotamian archaisms within the relict tongues in extinction: Brayska besyda in northern Istra peninsula, Kyrska bešeda at the coastal valley of Vinodol, and the most archaic Gan-Veyan in Krk island – with only 49% Slavic vocabulary and 19% of Pre-Slavic archaisms from the Old Orient. The initial ancient Croatian was an Indo-Iranian tongue of Old Orient, and its slavonizing started from 7th cent. AD, and was completed in 20th cent. in Yugoslavia, where the dogmatic Panslavist 'Vukovians' eliminated and prohibited nearly all Indo-Iranian archaisms in public Croatian: they survived only in some rural dialects, and in Croatian emigration.

    For more check out original site; http://hr.metapedia.org/wiki/Starohrvatski_jezik#Slavenski_kroatizirani_dialekti

    #385535

    Anonymous

    Well, apparently proto-slavic got many loanwords from proto-Iranian. For example Grad (P-S) and Gerd (now Jerd due to Arabs) (P-I), both mean settlement. And I think Vatra is Iranian as well.

    #385536

    Anonymous

    Also, that site is about alternate theories. That same site claims Josip Broz Tito was a Jew called Joshua Ambroz Tito ;D

    #385537

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Also, that site is about alternate theories. That same site claims Josip Broz Tito was a Jew called Joshua Ambroz Tito ;D

    Aha ok thanks for info. ;D Well about word vatra hm we dont have word vatra in Slovene. We say ogenj not vatra. :)

    #385538

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Well about word vatra hm we dont have word vatra in Slovene. We say ogenj not vatra. :)

    I think Ukrainians have ватра, but it means something like bonfire to them. Not all Slavic languages are influenced to the same degree.

    #385539

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I think Ukrainians have ватра, but it means something like bonfire to them. Not all Slavic languages are influenced to the same degree.

    True. Anyway i guess we can safely say that text is full of bollocks and thus should not be used as serious information about starohrvatski jezik.

    #385540

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    True. Anyway i guess we can safely say that text is full of bollocks and thus should not be used as serious information about starohrvatski jezik.

    Well, there are theories of the Iranian origins of Croats. Interestingly though, it's not only Croats that claim Iranian origin, some Bulgarian scholars now are claiming Bulgarians are Iranian rather than Turkic in origin.

    #385541

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Well, there are theories of the Iranian origins of Croats. Interestingly though, it's not only Croats that claim Iranian origin, some Bulgarian scholars now are claiming Bulgarians are Iranian rather than Turkic in origin.

    I think it is possible that original Croats & even Serbs might be of Iranic stock but if it is true that was like eons ago.

    #385542

    Anonymous

    There is no word ''ватра" in modern Russian. Not that I know of. But we do have the word ''ватрушка" (a type of cheesecake in traditional cuisine) which is a derivative of ватра.  :)

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f5/Vatrushka.jpg/250px-Vatrushka.jpg

    #385543

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I think Ukrainians have ватра, but it means something like bonfire to them. Not all Slavic languages are influenced to the same degree.

    From Slavic countries, I know that Polish language has watra.

    Even Romanian language has vatra .

    #385544

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    There is no word ''ватра" in modern Russian. But we do have the word ''ватрушка" (a type of cheesecake in traditional cuisine) which is a derivative of ватра.  :)

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f5/Vatrushka.jpg/250px-Vatrushka.jpg

    Maybe because it's made from fire? ;D

    #385545

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    From Slavic countries, I know that Polish language has watra.

    Even Romanian language has vatra .

    Do you know what they mean in those languages?

    #385546

    Anonymous

    Just found out that vatra also means bonfire in Czech.

    #385547

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Do you know what they mean in those languages?

    In Polish is not very common word, it's an old word, used at Podhale rarely. It means a fire which gathers the people around.

    In Romanian vatră means two things:1. hearth  2.when a man who was in a battle or a person whe went away for a period comes back to his home and his familily , you can say that this person comes back to vatră ( here vatră= home).

    #385548

    Anonymous

    огањ – fireplace or fire depending on context
    ватра – fire

    огњиште – hearth

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