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  • #347266

    Anonymous

    Just right before I started writing this thread, I found that maybe it’s not relevant at all. But I’m making this thread anyway, because I want to see if it’s true.

    So, I wanted to ask you a question about full dubbing in Slavic countries, but it maybe concerns only Czechia and Slovakia.
    I just found this map on Wiki:

    RED: Countries that use full dubbing most of the time.
    RED+BLUE: Countries that use full dubbing, but sometimes use dubbing from other countries/languages.
    ORANGE: Countries that sometimes use full dubbing, otherwise only subtitles.
    BLUE: Countries that use full dubbing only for movies or cartoons for children, otherwise only subtitles.
    YELLOW: Countries that use voice-over (dubbing with the original audio playing in the background).

    As you can see, Czechia is red, so they use full dubbing. Slovakia is red and blue, because we use both Slovak and Czech dubbing. I can’t imagine watching The Simpsons in any language other than Czech, yep, not even Slovak. :) We (and also Czechs) use voice-over only for documentaries and TV shows.
    All other Slavic countries apparently don’t use full dubbing that often.

    So my new question is: Is that true? Do Polacy :) and East Slavs use exclusively voice-overs? Do South Slavs use only subtitles?

    *******************************

    Because if not, I would like to get to the original topic.
    So if I had to choose the best Slavic dubbing ever, I would say Czech actor František Filipovský for dubbing Louis de Funès in his movies.
    I heard that Funès liked Filipovský’s dubbing the most.

    If you’re already used to one dubbing, it’ll be hard for you to tell, but anyway, let’s hear an example:

    1. ORIGINAL

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lt-QGxxjRKQ

    2. GERMAN (for comparison)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c2uTvlvobgY

    3. aaaaand the CZECH version

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eb-9Ix0Oyg4

    So, what do you think? :)
    I would say that this Czech voice really fits his character and his tiny figure. :)
    I watched some more videos with his original (French) voice, but it doesn’t fit that well for me.

    What would you nominate as the best Slavic dubbing? Give me some examples. :p

    #437993

    Anonymous

    Yes, in the south it’s always subtitles. There are voice-overs for some documentaries and cartoons are dubbed, but everything else has subtitles. btw I like Croatian cartoon dubbing better, they know how to use different dialects to enrich the characters. In recent years some kids’ movies have also been dubbed, but still it’s nothing close to common practice.
    There was a attempt at dubbing here in Serbia some 10 years ago,, I don’t remember what was the name of the show, it aired on “B92”, but it wasn’t well received, I certainly didn’t like it. Slovaks and Czechs just know how to do it (while Germans just don’t…) I remember first time watching a movie with Slovak dubbing, De Niro never sounded that weird… It’s very weird for me to hear voices so drastically different that the ones I used to over the years. I watched first two seasons of Vikings with Slovak dubbing, it was excellent, I liked it more than the original and again so weird when I switched back to English original… So I think Slovaks are the best here, but I don’t have a specific example. (Czech feels unnatural to me, I’m just not used to it)

    #437995

    Anonymous

    @”Kapitán Denis” 

    I love de Funes. My family was watching his movies since I was a kid, and my dad always told me that funes said the Czech dubber had a better voice than he did. 

    I know from watching some Polish t.v they do seem to exclusively use that voice over thing. It was the dumbest and most annoying thing I’d ever seen. I think foreign movies should only have subtitles as they seem more natural in the original langauge, but full dubbing is ok too. This sub dubbing thing Polish people do is ridiculous. 

    #437996

    Anonymous

    @srdceleva Russian dubbing is even worse. They dub even their own films if foreign language is used. I just don’t get it, they go long way to find foreign actors and then just put same monotone voice over it…

    #437997

    Anonymous

    I wish it was only subtitles here – I can’t remember the last time I’ve seen a movie or series without dubs here. Usually, if it’s with subs, it’s some obscure European movie, like an old French drama running on the national television. Everything else is with dubs, which for me is horrible – I much prefer watching movies and series with subs (heck, I even watch English shows with English subs on my computer), as dubs are usually far worse than the original. F.e. in the OP example, both dubs sound awful to me (surprisingly, the German ones less so, though they are supposedly traditionally strong in dubbing). Mind you, the Bulgarian ones are hardly better:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uKDA6DYVFbk

    Btw, in the old days we also used to have voice-overs and especially in the 90s there were even some quite hilarious cases of one-man voice-overs.

    P.S. Speaking of Russian dubbing and voice-overs, does anyone remember Goblin’s parodies? Those were hilarious (even their BG subs were kinda creative)! :D

    P.P.S. I (and a few other guys I know) learned English a lot, if not even mostly, by watching Cartoon Network as kids, in the times when CN was aired (or rather cabled) here purely in English. Nowadays it’s got BG dubs as well, which I presume would lead to quite worse results in the English classes of our schools.

    #438000

    Anonymous

    I want to hear Hans Gruber from Die Hard speaking Russian. 

    #438002

    Anonymous

    @Dušan Yea, it’s always like that. Once you get used to one version, others sound weird to you. When it comes to CZ vs SK, then I would say it’s individual. Slovaks are used to Czech dubbing and many movies sound better in Czech than Slovak.

    One thing that is weird to me is Czech swear words. Czechs mostly use swears that sound soft to Slovaks. An example of how a sentence would be translated:
    English: Put that fuckin’ gun down! B)
    Slovak: Polož tú skurvenú pištoľ! B)
    Czech: Polož tu zasranou pistoli! :#

    Oh, and the second weird thing is that Czechs stopped using Slovak in their media. They even started to dub Slovak TV series. There are young Czechs that don’t understand Slovak. :( We would never abandon Czech language.

    There was a attempt at dubbing here in Serbia some 10 years ago

    Why don’t they try again? Slovak actors play in theaters, TV series, movies and they also dub movies. Why don’t Serbian studios make dubbing? :( You should start a petition. :D

    There was a TV show called Partička (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parti%C4%8Dka) that featured a dubbing game (live on stage).
    https://youtu.be/HkKZMg70tXM

    @srdceleva When it comes to movies, voice-over is very very VERY VERY rare in Czechia and Slovakia. We use voice-over only for documentaries and some TV shows. But the quality is good. There is a woman that dubs female voices and a man that dubs male voices, sometimes there are even more people and kids that dub kids. The volume of the original voice is so low that you can barely hear it and the commentary (voice without actors) is completely replaced by the translated one.
    I think it’s a good idea for documentaries.

    @NikeBG

    Usually, if it’s with subs, it’s some obscure European movie, like an old French drama running on the national television.

    Same here. The underground movies (I think it’s called kinoklub) that run on the national TV with subs at night. :D It’s usually Scandinavian movies.

    I (and a few other guys I know) learned English a lot, if not even mostly, by watching Cartoon Network as kids, in the times when CN was aired (or rather cabled) here purely in English.

    Yea, I remember the old Cartoon Network. :D I learned a lot of English watching it.
    Still remember some of the shows. Powerpuff Girls, Ed, Edd, Eddy, Johnny Bravo, Dexter’s Lab, Courage The Cowardly Dog… :D Every day after school. :D
    I’m also wondering if the dubbing has any effects on childrens’ grades. :D

    #438006

    Anonymous

    Is or was Mighty Morphin’  Power Rangers shown in your countries? That is my favorite childhood show. 

    #438009

    Anonymous

    @”Kapitán Denis” Both Slovak and Czech swears are to weak for people here. Slovaks here swear in Serbian beacause of that. I know that feeling young Czechs have. We, Slovaks down here don’t have much contact with Czech and I do have troubles understanding it. Of course, I understand what is the topic of conversation and most of it from the context, but I wound’t be able to have a complex meaningful conversation. 
    People here don’t like dubbing, I don’t like it very much either+it takes time to achieve quality and no one wants to listen to shitty dubbing for years. We’re used to subs+it helps with learning languages.
    I watched Partička once or twice…
    I know what happens in Slovakia, I watch films, some TV shows and listen to Slovak music all the time. I really enjoyed the story of your nick here, to bad Slovakia doesn’t have more satirists, there is so much material in your internal politics.

    #438018

    Anonymous

    @Dušan Please, write down a list of the strongest Serbian swear words. I want to make a comparison. :D

    I really enjoyed the story of your nick here, to bad Slovakia doesn’t
    have more satirists, there is so much material in your internal
    politics.

    Hehehe, yea. If I joined a bit later, my name would be probably Poštár Denis. :D

    #438020

    Anonymous

    @Karpivna You mean this? :D
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EzDcJMbOYFc
    The quality of the picture and sound is awful and there is also a sound delay. Looks like they ripped it on a VHS.

    #438022

    Anonymous

    @”Kapitán Denis” there was a thread on swears not too long ago. I think you posted in it. But it would better if you wrote what you think are strongest Slovak swears and I’ll top them with Serbian ones :D

    #438023

    Anonymous

    Aaaah, c’mon! You know them. There’s just a few of them. Piča, kokot, chuj, jebo, kurva…

    #438024

    Anonymous

    @”Kapitán Denis” of course, but those are just words, it’s a simple translation. I mean give me the phrases you think are strong :D as for this piča-pička/pizda, kokot/chuj-kurac/kara (weaker), kurva-kurva, although you can’t use it here the way it’s used among west Slavs, throwing it wherever you want, it means just whore.

    Everybody else here, sorry. Comments here rarely stay on topic…  

    #438025

    Anonymous
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