Viewing 15 posts - 106 through 120 (of 129 total)
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  • #461067

    Miki Veliki Miki Ludi
    Participant
    @mikiveliki

    @olga_kysil

    Hmmm, funny you should mention. Of course, like any stereotype, it can be wildly off. But the “stoic mountain warrior” thing is kind of a part of the national identity / value system, whatever you call it. I think that’s where Trump was coming from. I am surprised that he knew that stereotype, he must have gotten cliff-notes from Melania. He said “They are very very strong people. They are aggressive people”.

    Here is a fun fact. Montenegro is a tiny nation. In ex-YU, they were never more than 3-4% of the total population. Yet, in the WWII, one third of the commanders in partisan forces were Montenegrins. Their četnik units too were strong, relative to the size of the nation.

    #461068

    Dušan
    Participant
    @dusan

    question for you guys from ex socialist countries (so Slavic). Do old and middle aged people who claim it was better during socialist regime  use “You could sleep on a park bench and nothing would happen to you” argument in your country? That very common here and is often subject of some jokes. I was just watching some documentary shot in Slovakia in 2001 and a man says that exact thing, so I have to ask.

    #461074

    Kapitán Denis
    Participant
    @kapitan-denis

    @dusan

    Well, here in Slovakia, or Czecho-Slovakia, you would catch a cold. 😀

    Personally I’ve never heard people saying this. When my relatives talk about the socialist times, they always mention only what they experienced. They would say “we used to do this and that” but never something what could or couldn’t happen. Of course every person is different so you’ll find people who would say that.

    #461082

    Dušan
    Participant
    @dusan

    @kapitan-denis here that’s pretty common. There are few things they say: you had the red passport (unlike other people from socialist countries Yugoslavs had pretty wide freedom of movement),  you had a job in a state owned company, the police did their job (all means necessary), and of course you could sleep on a bench. On the things they used to do there’s buying jeans in Trieste and of course for minority selling the said jeans (plus vegeta and vinjak) in Czecho-Slovakia.

    #461083

    NikeBG
    Participant
    @nikebg

    Nothing like that here either. In terms of security, the nostalgics simply say that people didn’t lock their doors and would just come and go, visiting each other freely (although that doesn’t really mean there was no crime, of course).

    #461085

    Shaokang
    Participant
    @shaokang

    I think its because communism made more egalitarian society. Lack of technologies such as for example internet and import of foreign movies, where different values were shown, allowed cultural isolation from foreign influence and opportunity for elite of the country to form the society by their needs. It shouldn’t be neglected the fact that many people are emotional and nostalgic once they become old (different definition for different people) so its not unusual to wish for the things that weren’t all good but due to memories of their youth they may have an illusion of better times. Also, I’m not saying that many people had better times back then.

    #461111

    Dušan
    Participant
    @dusan

    @shaokang exactly, I say that all the time, everybody loves their youth 🙂 I now days meet people who claim they had it better in the 90s and I know that at least 50% of my generation will claim that Vučić’s era was the best. Being twenty something with life ahead of you and no dept will always be the best regime.

    #461115

    Shaokang
    Participant
    @shaokang

    @dusan I agree. Life is an everyday struggle. Its hard. Nobody likes facing the difficulties, but we must. Its great if you have someone to help you through your life, regardless what kind of a help it is.

    #461117

    Miki Veliki Miki Ludi
    Participant
    @mikiveliki

    @dusan

    Funny you should mention. I slept on a bench less than a month ago in a small college town in Cali. I do sleep on a bench every once in a while. There are some places where I wouldn’t dare to do that. Like, I was in Seattle in June and I thought about it but I didn’t do it.  Too many street crazies.

    I bet it’s still doable in ex-YU. It’s the police you have to worry about over there, actually. Especially if it’s a tourist town. They hunt you down. But it was like that in socialism too.

    #461126

    Kapitán Denis
    Participant
    @kapitan-denis

    Wikipedia is constantly being translated to many languages, even Church Slavic and Old East Slavic. What I find interesting is that these languages look at the world from their own perspective, based on the culture and the time when these languages were spoken (I know CS is still used), rather than from the modern perspective.

     

    For example, unlike in every other language on Wikipedia, in Church Slavic, the Glagolitic script is called Cyrillic script: https://cu.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%9A%D1%B7%D1%80%D1%97%D0%BB%D0%BB%D0%BE%D0%B2%D0%B8%D1%86%D0%B0

     

    In Old East Slavic, Ukraine is called Little Russia. The name has nothing to do with modern Russia, but it refers to Rus’ (the land of all East Slavs). Russia is just Rus’ with the “-ia” suffix, denoting a country. https://incubator.wikimedia.org/wiki/Wp/orv/%D0%9C%D0%B0%D0%BB%D0%BE%D1%80%D1%B9%D1%81%D1%81i%D1%A9

    Just a little note. The page says “Малороссїѩ, нынѣ Україна…”, which translates as “Little Russia, now Ukraine…”. The word for “now” – “нынѣ” corresponds with Ukrainian word “нині”, Russian “ныне” and Czech “nyní”. Another word Czech shares with Russian, while Slovak doesn’t have it. 😀

     

    So what do you people think? Is it right to use the old names for countries and scripts and other stuff in these languages? Or should it be updated?

    I know, it’s like English uses “Germany”, while we use “Nemecko” instead of “Germánia/Germánsko”. But still, Little Russia is an obsolete geographical term. Even Hungarians updated their vocabulary when it was necessary (Rác -> Szerb, Tót -> Szlovák).

    #461232

    Olga Kysil
    Participant
    @olga_kysil

    I am currently reading The Black Book of Communism edited by Stephane Courtois. This is the cure for any lingering romanticism about communism. Courtoise and 10 other scholars offer a country-by-country accounting of the cruelty, terror, human waste and castastrophe (the body count exceeds 100 million.)

    Socialism: You have two cows. You give one cow to your neighbor.

    Communism: You have two cows.  You give both cows to the government with the false hope that they might give you some milk.

    Fascism: You have two cows. You give all of the milk to the government and the government sells it.

    Nazism: You have two cows. They are found not to be Aryan cows. The government shoots you and places the cows in a labor camp.

    Anarchism: You have two cows. You keep both of the cows, shoot the government agent and steal another cow.

    Capitalism: You have two cows. You sell one cow and buy a bull.

    Surrealism: You have two giraffes. The government makes you take accordion lessons.

    #461463

    Miki Veliki Miki Ludi
    Participant
    @mikiveliki

    I was curious, are the countries of former Yugoslavia the only ones with decrepit and semi-started+abandoned houses all over the place, or is that the case elsewhere in Slavic lands? What about other regions of Europe, is that a common thing to see in some countries? What about wasted/unused land covered with weeds? I can’t remember ever seeing anything like that in Germany  or France.

    #461508

    GLK
    Participant
    @glk

    Makedonski Reverse Parking Sensors… 🙂

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JAl_Ze08I3Y

    #461509

    Kapitán Denis
    Participant
    @kapitan-denis

    @glk It reminded me of this commercial

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hw4Z3qUuWPs

    #461550

    Olga Kysil
    Participant
    @olga_kysil

    @glk When I was at the Orthodox Church for the funeral on Wednesday, I saw flyers for the Macedonian Patriotic Organization’s convention. It will be held August 31-September 3, 2018 in Columbus, Ohio.

    http://macedonian.org/joomla/

    I also saw copies of the Macedonian Tribune newspaper.

    The Macedonian Tribune is the oldest Macedonian newspaper in the world published continuously since February 10, 1927. Over the entire course of its existence the Macedonian Tribune has served as a valuable news and reference source on Macedonia, the Macedonian People and Macedonian issues for many governmental institutions and non-governmental organizations in the United States, Canada and throughout the world. Additionally, the Macedonian Tribune provides a vehicle for Macedonian-Americans and Macedonian-Canadians throughout North America to learn more about each other and the achievements, accomplishments, and milestones of Macedonians in the United States and Canada.

    The value of the Macedonian Tribune comes from its establishment and publication in the United States thereby allowing Macedonians the ability to voice their opinions on Macedonian issues without fear of any reprisal by the oppressive regimes that ruled and in some cases still rule parts of Macedonia. This inherent value is demonstrated by the fact that the Macedonian Tribune has the distinct honor of being the only Macedonian newspaper to have been banned at the same time in Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, and Greece for most of the 20th Century.

    The Macedonian Tribune has always been a newspaper of unquestionable integrity, supported exclusively by subscriptions and the donations of time, funds, and effort by countless numbers of Macedonian-Americans and Macedonian-Canadians and published by an all-volunteer editorial staff.

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