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  • #346198

    Anonymous

    Serbian/Croatian/Slovenian/Macedonian/Bulgarian/Czech/Slovakian: sestra, сестра (in Cyrillic)
    Russian/Ukrainian: сестра (spelt as sestra but pronounced with a very short e)
    Belorusian: сястра (siastra)
    Polish: siostra

    From Proto-Slavic *sestra, from Proto-Indo-European *swésōr.

    Notice how the word for mother-in-law in the following Slavic languages shares the same suffix as the PIE word for sister. I think that the suffix 'sve' in the Slavic words and the suffix 'swe' from the PIE word mean 'one's own'.

    Russian: свекровь (svekrov') (this particularly refers to the husband's mother)
    Serbian/Croatian: свекрва, svekrva (this particularly refers to the husband's mother)
    Ukrainian: свекруха (svekrukha)
    Belarusian: свякроў (sviakroŭ)
    Slovak: svokra
    Bulgarian: свекърва (svekŭrva)
    Macedonian: свекрва (svekarva)

    #425964

    Anonymous

    There's also sestrica/сестрица in Serbo-Croatian which refers to someones little sister.

    #425965

    Anonymous

    In Russian there're following affectionate diminutive forms:
    сестрёнка – sestr`jonka
    сестричка – sestr`ichka
    сестрица – sestr`ica (quite archaic)

    And quite a rough, plebeian form:
    сеструха – sestr`uha

    #425966

    Anonymous

    In macedonian they go like
    Сестра/sestra-sister
    Сестричка/sestrichka-younger sister
    There is also the form Дада/Dada for older sister. It's sometimes used for older cousins. Or from a very young kid towards an older girl. I don't know if this word is of slavic origin or turkish.
    The male equivalent is Бато/Bato.

    #425967

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Notice how the word for mother-in-law in the following Slavic languages shares the same suffix as the PIE word for sister. I think that the suffix 'sve' in the Slavic words and the suffix 'swe' from the PIE word mean 'one's own'.

    In Macedonian there is also свеска (sveska) – sister in law. It's probably derived from the same root.

    It's used exclusively for the wife's sister, while for the husband's sister there is another term – золва (zolva).

    #425968

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    The male equivalent is Бато/Bato.

    There's a Georgian word 'бат`оно' meaning 'mister'. It's used like Polish 'pan'. I don't know if it's related.

    #425969

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    There's a Georgian word 'бат`оно' meaning 'mister'. It's used like Polish 'pan'. I don't know if it's related.

    Bato could come from the child's inability to pronounce 'r' correctly. Brat>Bat>bato
    I have no idea what origin Dada has.

    #425970

    Anonymous

    In Serbian "little sister":  mala sestra = sestrica.
    Colloquial or affectionate forms are seka, seja and sela in the same way like the English would say "sis" or "sissy".

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