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  • #347281

    Anonymous

    Hey i found this picture on English site, it must be Russian author from the drawing style of it & the context also mentioned as Russian, so i wonder if any of you could identify author. I would appreciate it greatly. Thank you. The logs are hives so it is about beekeeper.

    https://static.wixstatic.com/media/42a31e_74ffe85e49774e38888dbd86afde1c4d.jpg/v1/fill/w_1102,h_741,al_c,q_90,usm_0.66_1.00_0.01/42a31e_74ffe85e49774e38888dbd86afde1c4d.jpg

    #438289

    Anonymous

    Google search of the image shows this name: Андрей Николаевич Шильдер. Andrei Nikolayevich Shilder, I don’t know if this is correct Latin spelling.

    #438290

    Anonymous

    Wikipedia says he was landscape painter who also did theater scenography .

    #438291

    Anonymous

    There are numerous paintings of beehives in Russian classic art. I like paintings by Bogatov and Shishkin : http://www.liveinternet.ru/users/2010239/post108324641

    #438292

    Anonymous

    Hey guys thanks. The more (picures) the better. Keep em’ coming. As a beekeeper myself i like this subject. In fact i plan to remake some of these hives myself….. XD

    #438300

    Anonymous

    @Povhec Do you live of beekeeping or do you do it as a hobby?

    #438378

    Anonymous

    @Dušan only hobby. There are people living off this but being a risky job in terms of potentially losing lots of families due to varroa, diseases, having bad seasons, etc. i think i would worry way to much. Being beekeeper today is a lot harder than it used to be. Varroa came from Asia, farmers mow way to often here hence bad “pasture” & to much usage of chemicals for crops, etc. it puts burden.

    #438380

    Anonymous

    #438416

    Anonymous

    I just saw what I posted. My family has some bees too. It’s just a hobby, especially in the last ~5 years, we lost a lot of families (we call it društvo, so this family is a bit weird to me), due to a bad summer with small amount of sunny days, that is days bees find safe to go out, followed by harsh winter. We never had many hives, but now we have just a few.

    #438465

    Anonymous

    Here we call a bee “colony” a family aka družina & družina is also for humans so i wrote family. :D Altho one would also ask how many hives one has. I just checked in English its called bee nest. Anyways yeah it sucks to be beekeeper in this era.

    At least in Serbia you people still mow normally or so i hear. Here in Slo farmers now mow even 6 times a year. Historically it was 1 to 3 times a year, depending on situation and area. So most meadows nowadays are just grass and dandelion. We have some tiny meadow mowed only twice, & i can tell you difference is huge. There are so many colors. Hence bad pasture. Also there used to be lots of buckwheat which is great for bees, now very few “plant” buckwheat anymore. So yeah….

    #438472

    Anonymous

    I just visited Slovenia two weeks ago for the first time (if we don’t count piss brakes on gas stations during trip to Italy). I was in Ljubljana and Portorož. Your country is beautiful, You got it all, meadows, mountains, forests, the sea. I really  enjoyed, although it was just for a weekend and I traveled twice LJ to Portorož and back. I’ll have to come again for a longer time to enjoy. Funny thing, I spoke with exactly seven Slovenians (including the waiters), the rest were Bosnians (Serbs).
    Anyway, we keep our hives on our field, every other year or so we have sunflowers there and the first neighbor has an orchard so they usually have pasture. There are also few overgrown areas nearby that have some honey giving plants in abundance. Obviously we aren’t aiming for some high quality honey, in fact there wasn’t much of it in the last years.
    There aren’t much meadows in my area, it’s mostly fields with cereals, soy, sugar beet and sunflowers. We have plenty of forests though, but again not, in my bee area. People who are in this business seriously here usually keep their bees in the forest (we have a lot of linden here) or close to the forest and orchards and vineyards.

    #438483

    Anonymous

    Petro Prokopovych (1775–1850, UkrainianПетро Прокопович) was the founder of commercial beekeeping. He introduced novelties in traditional beekeeping that allowed great progress in the practice. Among his most important inventions was a hive frame in a separate honey chamber of his beehive. He also invented a crude queen excluder between brood and honey chambers. 

    Prokopovych was born in Ukraine (then part of the Russian Empire), in the village of Mytchenky near Baturyn. He was of Cossack-Ukrainian descent. Starting at the age of eleven, he studied at the Kiev-Mohyla Academy for eight years. After studies he committed to a military career. He resigned his commission in 1798, bearing officer rank, and enjoyed retirement at his brother’s apiary. By 1808 Prokopovych had 580 beehives.

    Prokopovych studied the biology of bee colonies and strove to improve existing methods of beekeeping. His main intention was to develop methods that allowed the least disturbance and damage to bees. These efforts resulted in 1814 in the invention of the world’s first frame hive, which allowed an easier honey harvest. Another invention was a wooden partition with apertures passable only by worker bees, now called a queen excluder. It made possible the harvest of pure honey from the frames. Prokopovych’s inventions represented a landmark in the history of beekeeping and marked the beginning of commercial beekeeping. His scientific work resulted in more than sixty articles in printed media such as newspapers and magazines.

    Another passion of Prokopovych was teaching. He set up a beekeeping school that prepared more than 700 qualified beekeepers over its 53 years of existence. As a beekeeper, Prokopovych owned 6600 colonies and became wealthy.

    Prokopovych was buried in the village of Palchyky in the Bakhmach Raion of Chernihiv Oblast, where his beekeepers’ school was located. A monument to Prokopovych stands there, and the Ukrainian Institute of Beekeeping is named after him.

    The Ukraine National Beekeeping Museum in Kyiv is open to the public. Information here: http://unbm.org.ua/

    Beekeeping in Ukraine: Innovative Frames for Effective Ukrainian Beehive of Vasyl Priyatelenko [Video in English]. 
    Featuring Dr Victor Fursov – Entomologist Beekeeper Teacher.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TrQZwHTYXrM

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