• This topic has 8 voices and 15 replies.
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 16 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #346590

    Anonymous

    When I was born my father planted an apple tree. Apparently there was a tradition in some parts of Serbia to plant a tree when a child is born, so each child has a twin tree.

    Do you know of any other Slavic country with similar tradition? I could not actually find any information on the net about this tradition in Serbia either. I only know it from memory and oral tradition.

    Any help would be great.

    #432441

    Anonymous

    I've never heard of this tradition. I'm not sure this custom is widespread among South Slavs.

    But it sounds very interesting. Please share if you know something more about it.

    #432442

    Anonymous

    yeah there is a famous verse in on of the Đorđe Balašević songs:
    "Na dan kad sam rođen tu je posađen orah…"
    eng.- " On the day I was born, the walnut was tree was planted"
    From what I know, people plant specific tree so that the newborn baby can "absorb" the positive characteristics of it.
    for example dren (dogwood) and walnut tree are famous for its strength, peer tree for its roughness and ability to grow in the most harsh soil and so on
    my grandad planted a white birch when I was born and a pine tree for my brother.

    #432443

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    yeah there is a famous verse in on of the Đorđe Balašević songs:
    "Na dan kad sam rođen tu je posađen orah…"
    eng.- " On the day I was born, the walnut was tree was planted"
    From what I know, people plant specific tree so that the newborn baby can "absorb" the positive characteristics of it.
    for example dren (dogwood) and walnut tree are famous for its strength, peer tree for its roughness and ability to grow in the most harsh soil and so on
    my grandad planted a white birch when I was born and a pine tree for my brother.

    Maybe it is a serbian tradition? Specific only for Serbs. Me also never heard nothing about that, but it is very interesting. Brđanin do you know saying: "Ispod oraja/oraha se vištice skupljaju!" ;)

    #432444

    Anonymous
    Quote:

    Maybe it is a serbian tradition? Specific only for Serbs. Me also never heard nothing about that, but it is very interesting.

    I dont know where did we get that tradition. It is not "strict" or obligational one though. lots of people don't even practice it and I actually never thought about it seriously until now. It is probably just one of those superstition thing which we have when trees are involved. for example few years ago two brothers from my place died in a car accident. people started talking that their father is to blame because he planted a spruce tree really close to his house… strange stuff

    Brđanin do you know saying: "Ispod oraja/oraha se vištice skupljaju!" ;)

    nope, never heard of it. only squirrels gather under our walnut trees :D

    #432445

    Anonymous

    Now that you've mentioned it, a pine tree was planted in our garden when I was born. After 25 years it became HUGE!

    I've never asked my family why did they plant it, cause I never thought about its symbolism, which seems to be present.

    I'm not sure about it, but shouldn't the pine represent a holiness for us Slavs?

    That's what I've found on Wikipedia:

    Boruta (also called Leśny or Lešny) was a demon in the Slavic mythology. In ancient Slavic, boruta meant pine tree: according to the folklore, the god dwelled indeed in this kind of trees.

    He was the lord of the woods and hunting like the god Borevit, of which he probably represents a local version. He was portrayed as an imposing figure, with horns over the head, surrounded by packs of wolves and bears.

    "…according to the folklore, the god dwelled indeed in this kind of trees." I guess that the god who dwells in the pine tree should be there as a protection for the newborn child? ??? What do you think?

    Interesting that you came to this Dublin!

    #432446

    Anonymous

    Dažbog you are partly correct. Pine wood is often mentioned as sacred tree in slavic old religion. But the problem with pine tree is that often it doesn`t reffer on actually pine tree, rather on some other tree. Example: "oj javore zelen bore". It is connected with old slavic gods, because on the top of the there is hawk on the dry branch, and in the bottom of the tree is snake. dry branch (sometimes gold branch) vs bottom, roots, moist water, relationship between Perun and Veles. There is a lot of these kind relationships "hidden" in everyday sayings, poems etc.
    Regarding this tree planting, you boys should be careful, because it is ancient jewish tradition :D To be slavic tradition it must occur in other slavic nations. Maybe other members of forum could help. I found some things that are saying that in old days tree would be plant on the day when the child is born (Dalmatia) or on the wedding day. But i must confirm this with other sources.
    Brđanin: old saying in dalmatian hinterland, dinaric area (witches and nuts :) )

    #432447

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Boruta (also called Leśny or Lešny) was a demon in the Slavic mythology. In ancient Slavic, boruta meant pine tree: according to the folklore, the god dwelled indeed in this kind of trees.

    Hmm, could the Slovenian name Borut come from this? I've never heard of this before. Interesting.

    Never heard of this tradition of planting trees. Though I've heard something about rakija … ;D

    #432448

    Anonymous

    Interesting that you came to this Dublin!

    <br /:)” title=”>:)” class=”bbcode_smiley” />

    Why?

    #432449

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Dažbog you are partly correct. Pine wood is often mentioned as sacred tree in slavic old religion. But the problem with pine tree is that often it doesn`t reffer on actually pine tree, rather on some other tree. Example: "oj javore zelen bore". It is connected with old slavic gods, because on the top of the there is hawk on the dry branch, and in the bottom of the tree is snake. dry branch (sometimes gold branch) vs bottom, roots, moist water, relationship between Perun and Veles. There is a lot of these kind relationships "hidden" in everyday sayings, poems etc.
    Regarding this tree planting, you boys should be careful, because it is ancient jewish tradition :D To be slavic tradition it must occur in other slavic nations. Maybe other members of forum could help. I found some things that are saying that in old days tree would be plant on the day when the child is born (Dalmatia) or on the wedding day. But i must confirm this with other sources.
    Brđanin: old saying in dalmatian hinterland, dinaric area (witches and nuts :) )

    +1 Ivane :D I don't know if this tradition is especially Slavic or Jewish or is this especially for any other culture but sure is planting tree a worldwide ceremony. Also you have a lots of planting tree ceremonies around the world. From marriage to birth tree planting etc.http://weddingtraditions.about.com/od/MarriageTraditions/a/The-Wedding-Tree.htm

    Here I also found some article about planting tree in jewish tradition: http://www.ritualwell.org/ritual/tree-planting-ritual

    Quote:
    Never heard of this tradition of planting trees.

    How didn't you Štajerc :) We are planting tree for every special occasion. Slovenes were planting specially tilia tree. Once upon a time Slovenes have also ceremony that grandfather planted a tree when his grandchild was born. Usually if it wasn't tilia tree than it was a nut tree, because it has good and valuable fruits and grow so high and it's strong. Where is implanted tree close to home, will protect house from lightning.

    Here you have a lot of occasion when is planted trees for special occasions: http://www.dvajset.si/posadili/

    Quote:
    Though I've heard something about rakija … ;D

    True :) People abandoning this old tradition. Now it's more popular to bury the liter of spirit drink or give it to his father when child is born. Than drink it when child reach eighteen years of age or when it's get his own child :)

    #432450

    Anonymous

    thank you all guys for your replies

    #432451

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    <br /:)” title=”>:)” class=”bbcode_smiley” />

    Why?

    Because I have had the tree in front of me for my whole life, and I never cared to ask anyone about it, even though I knew that it was planted on the day I was born.

    I didn't know that it was a widespread custom amongst our people.

    #432452

    Anonymous
    Quote:

    How didn't you Štajerc :) We are planting tree for every special occasion. Slovenes were planting specially tilia tree. Once upon a time Slovenes have also ceremony that grandfather planted a tree when his grandchild was born. Usually if it wasn't tilia tree than it was a nut tree, because it has good and valuable fruits and grow so high and it's strong. Where is implanted tree close to home, will protect house from lightning.

    Here you have a lot of occasion when is planted trees for special occasions: http://www.dvajset.si/posadili/
    True :) People abandoning this old tradition. Now it's more popular to bury the liter of spirit drink or give it to his father when child is born. Than drink it when child reach eighteen years of age or when it's get his own child :)

    Well, I guess it wasn't practised among my direct ancestors. We only planted trees at school for the occasional crapy international day of bull shit. That's all. :) And for rakija I've heard only among other South Slavs. Slovenes usually pay a round and get hammered hadcore when a baby is born. That's all.

    #432453

    Anonymous

    Planting tree precisely becouse child is born isn't really any tradition in Slovenia. I don't recal something like that in ethnography tbh. If any ever did or dose it, its rather random. Or perhaps if someone was anticipating child so dearly that he planted a tree in gratitute. Tree's, usually lindens were planted next to a house, church, etc. The village also usually had common village tree, most often somewhere in a center. Which was major place for festivites. Commeration planting for special occasions was usually done by secular and religious authoroties. Like Napoleons avenue. Closest to say the commerative nature of planting trees among common folk should be "turkish lindens" which are linden trees planted in an area where "turks" (acutally most often christian subjects of ottoman empire, also usually south slavs) were beaten or driven away.

    I think similar must be down south. Cuz seriously imagine back then how large families were. Now imagine whole village planting a tree for a each child. In a range of 2 generations village should be a faking forest. :D

    #432454

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Planting tree precisely becouse child is born isn't really any tradition in Slovenia. I don't recal something like that in ethnography tbh. If any ever did or dose it, its rather random. Or perhaps if someone was anticipating child so dearly that he planted a tree in gratitute. Tree's, usually lindens were planted next to a house, church, etc. The village also usually had common village tree, most often somewhere in a center. Which was major place for festivites. Commeration planting for special occasions was usually done by secular and religious authoroties. Like Napoleons avenue. Closest to say the commerative nature of planting trees among common folk should be "turkish lindens" which are linden trees planted in an area where "turks" (acutally most often christian subjects of ottoman empire, also usually south slavs) were beaten or driven away.

    I think similar must be down south. Cuz seriously imagine back then how large families were. Now imagine whole village planting a tree for a each child. In a range of 2 generations village should be a faking forest. :D

    Or the planting of apple trees at Lipica and fruit trees along roads in general by the order of Maria Theresa or Joseph II. Indeed, the size of families back then, hehe … Imagine, my grandma had 13 siblings, which would make 14 trees for nothing (since members tell from pines and other unuseful trees), unless one would pland fruit trees, but that'd produce huge orchards or woods, just like you said.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 16 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Slavorum

11 User(s) Online Join Server
  • Shendelzare Silkwood
  • MaRk0V
  • LukaVader
  • canemadre
  • Lyutenitsa™
  • Australian Santa