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  • #344746

    Anonymous

    I've just got sick of the English, non-Slavic transliteration rules for the Cyrillic alphabet, so I propose Slavic transliteration rules. Now for Russian, Ukrainian ones would be similar (and that's why I use 'ch' for х, where 'h' would be simpler). Belarusian have its own transliteration rules, Serbian also. As for Bulgarians and Macedonians, I am not familiar enough with these languages to make Slavic transliteration rules for them.

    а – a
    б – b
    в – v
    г – g
    д – d
    е – je (or ie in the middle of a word)
    ё – jo (or io in the middle of a word)
    ж – ž
    з – z
    и – i
    й – j
    к – k
    л – l
    м – m
    н – n
    о – o
    п – p
    р – r
    с – s
    т – t
    у – u
    ф – f
    х – ch
    ц – c
    ч – č
    ш – š
    щ – šč (to keep with tradition and compatibility with other Cyrillic alphabets)
    ъ – "
    ы – y
    ь – '
    э – e
    ю – ju (or iu in the middle of a word)
    я – ja (or ia in the middle of a word)

    I've thought of separate symbols for letters with a soft sign, but it would complicate the alphabet too much.

    Of course this is only a proposal, I would like to know what do you think about it.

    #404693

    Anonymous

    What about the Bulgarian word 'продължа'? It would be 'prod"lža'? That just looks odd. Is there a better way to transliterate the letter 'ъ'? And what about Ї? How would that be transliterated, ji maybe?

    #404694

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Of course this is only a proposal, I would like to know what do you think about it.

    The idea is good but I don’t think it’s not going to work. People will continue to spell Slavic words in Latin alphabet differently.
    I don’t have the keyboard layout for some of the letters: ‘ж', 'ч' and ‘ш'. It’s quicker to type ‘zh’, ‘ch’ and ‘sch’ or ‘sh’ for 'ш' and ‘sh’ for 'щ'.

    #404695

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    What about the Bulgarian word 'продължа'? It would be 'prod"lža'? That just looks odd. Is there a better way to transliterate the letter 'ъ'? And what about Ї? How would that be transliterated, ji maybe?

    This is for Russian. For Ukrainian the differences would be:
    е – e
    є – je (ie in the middle of a word)
    і – i
    ї – ji
    и – y

    I'm not competent enough to make a Bulgarian transliteration.

    Quote:
    The idea is good but I don’t think it’s not going to work. People will continue to spell Slavic words in Latin alphabet differently.
    I don’t have the keyboard layout for some of the letters: ‘ж', 'ч' and ‘ш'. It’s quicker to type ‘zh’, ‘ch’ and ‘sch’ or ‘sh’ for 'ш' and ‘sh’ for 'щ'.

    So maybe use zh as a variant spelling for ž, sh for š and ch for č?

    #404696

    Anonymous

    I suggest:

    A = A
    Б = B
    В = V
    Г = G or H (depending on language)
    Ґ = H
    Д = D
    Ђ = Dj/
    Ѓ = Gj
    Е = E or Je/Ye (depending on language)
    Ё = Yo/Jo
    Є = Ye/Je
    Ж = Zh/Ž
    З = Z
    И = I or Y (depending on language)
    І = I
    Ї = Yi/Ji
    Й = J
    Ј = J
    К = K
    Л = L
    Љ = Lj
    М = M
    Н = N
    Њ = Nj
    О = O
    П = P
    P = R
    С = C
    Т = T
    Ћ = Tch/Ć
    Ќ = Kj
    У = U
    Ў = W
    Ф = F
    Х = H
    Ц = Ts/C
    Ч = Ch/Č
    Џ = Dzh/Dž
    Ш = Sh/Š
    Щ = Shch/Šč
    Ъ = E (like U in 'Cut')
    Ы = Y
    Ь = '
    Э = E
    Ю = Yu/Ju
    Я = Ya/Ja

    #404697

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    The idea is good but I don’t think it’s not going to work. People will continue to spell Slavic words in Latin alphabet differently.
    I don’t have the keyboard layout for some of the letters: ‘ж', 'ч' and ‘ш'. It’s quicker to type ‘zh’, ‘ch’ and ‘sch’ or ‘sh’ for 'ш' and ‘sh’ for 'щ'.

    ž=zs/zh
    č=cz/ch
    š=sz/sh
    щ=šč/št , ( the letter is combination of ш put ovet T , and you get the original št with the leg in the middle, see here    http://cs.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyrilice

    #404698

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    ž=zs/zh
    č=cz/ch
    š=sz/sh
    щ=šč/št , ( the letter is combination of ш put ovet T , and you get the original št with the leg in the middle, see here    http://cs.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyrilice

    I use cyrillic in 99% of text I write and read. It's ž, š,  č that I don't have installed on my computer. I can install an appropriate keyboard layout and use the letters. I am just saying it's unlikely people who use cyrillic alphabets in eastern Slavic countries have the letters ž, š,  č installed on their computers too. Most have Latin alphabets that come with standard American/British keyboard layouts.

    #404699

    Anonymous

    I have trouble remembering some of the letters.  I think the ones that have a combination of Roman alphabet letters are difficult because it is something not used often in our alphabet. 

    I really think I need a Berlitz class in total Russian immersion to learn this language!

    #404700

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    So maybe use zh as a variant spelling for ž, sh for š and ch for č?

    That looks good to me.

    #404701

    Anonymous

    Also pretty good online service for Cyrillic transliteration in Russian, Belarusian and Ukrainian  http://translit.ru

    #404702

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I use cyrillic in 99% of text I write and read. It's ž, š,  č that I don't have installed on my computer. I can install an appropriate keyboard layout and use the letters. I am just saying it's unlikely people who use cyrillic alphabets in eastern Slavic countries have the letters ž, š,  č installed on their computers too. Most have Latin alphabets that come with standard American/British keyboard layouts.

    you dont need special keyboard, you can write simply c,z,s

    or have some automatic  transliterator

    http://steen.free.fr/interslavic/transliterator_extended.html
    http://steen.free.fr/interslavic/transliterator.html

    #404703

    Anonymous

    I think in scientific proposes, standard for transliteration of Slavic Cyrillic alphabets is Czech Latin (basis for Serbo-Croatian and Slovene latin alpgabets.) Altough problem for random Eastern Slavic speaker is he does not š (ш) đ (that would be чь before б, д, г and other sound) č (ч) ć (чь) ž (ж).

    Concerning Serbian it has lathin script variant, Macedonian could use Serbo-Croatian with use of few modifications, there is also Bulgarian version of latin (for Banat dialect of Bulgarian). Also, there are latin alphabets for Ukrainian and Belarusian.

    #404704

    Anonymous

    first I saw transliteration of  "человек" as a chelovek, I was simply lost what does that mean :)) because in czech CH is pronounce as KH, so khelovek is nothing, than I recognized it is influenced by english.

    or …teche voda od yavora
    instead of…tecze voda od javora

    brrrrrrrrrr, zimnice :)))

    #404705

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    you dont need special keyboard, you can write simply c,z,s

    or have some automatic  transliterator

    http://steen.free.fr/interslavic/transliterator_extended.html
    http://steen.free.fr/interslavic/transliterator.html

    Mate, ž, š,  č and z, s, c are different letters and they will not be interchanged in transliterated text if they haven't been already . Installing another keyboard layout on a personal computer  takes 30 seconds.

    #404706

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Installing another keyboard layout on a personal computer  takes 30 seconds.

    But not on phone, so people will write differently on phones and computers. This problem will be always.

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