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  • #344828

    Anonymous

    Hello, my grandmother is partly Czech and her ancestral surname is Tuhý, I got told that it comes from Czech Silesia or that it could be SüdetenDeutsche. Any idea? Thanks

    #353242

    Anonymous

    Not sure, but on kdejsme.cz, there are 119 people in the Czech Republic with that surname, with the majority in Bohemia.

    #353243

    Anonymous

    Yes, but some infamous Czechs from Silesia carry this surname. Neither evidence is conclusive though. I’m waiting for more opinions, thanks for the info though, but I believe he came from Moravia or Silesia as he came in the early 20th century to Poland. Maybe some members may know why he immigrated?

    #353240

    Anonymous

    Do you not like Bohemians? Hahaha

    #353237

    Anonymous

    I don’t mind them 

    #353238

    Anonymous

    Then what makes you feel the name must be Moravian or Silesian.

    #353239

    Anonymous

    I don’t know. What makes you feel it must be Bohemian? 

    #353235

    Anonymous

    The fact that the overwhelming majority of Tuhys live there.

    #353236

    Anonymous

    Just because a majority of people bearing a surname live in a certain place doesn’t mean they are from there, are Smiths Native American as the overwhelming majority of Americans bear the surname Smith? No. It doesn’t. 

    #353221

    Anonymous

    @Bernhard On this point I would side Bohemian or Moravian ancestry because “Tuhý” is a surname describing feature of given person (tough or thug if you want) in Czech language. Description of given feature in Silesian language would be “Twardy” – more similar to Polish language than to Czech. Also letter “H” is quite rare in Silesian, you can mostly see “G” in Silesian where Czech uses “H” for instance: EN-His, CZ-Jeho, SI-Jego.

    #353219

    Anonymous
    Ah, but the way my ancestor spelled it was “tugy”. 
    #353206

    Anonymous

    Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Belarusian, certain southern Russian dialects do not have sound ‘G’. In Ukrainian and Belarusian ‘G’ is a fricative ‘G’ something between ‘H’ and ‘G’.

    In Belarusian ‘Tuhý’ is ‘Тугi’ (Tuhi) – literally tight or stiff. ‘Twardy’ sounds as Belarusian ‘ćviordy’ – firm or hard.

    #353184

    Anonymous

    Czech and Slovak doesn’t have sound of ‘G’ ??  Sorry @Sviatogor but you shot and missed. 
    Regarding Tuhý vs. Twardy. Polish and Silesian, as far as I know, do not distinguish between stiff and hard so much, twardy is often used for both cases.

    #353185

    Anonymous

    @Goryvlad

    I won’t be arguing with you. I talked to a Slovak guy who said there’re few words that strong ‘G’. Often, those are loan words. That’s what he said to me.

    #353186

    Anonymous

    He lived in Wołyń, 40k or so Czechs lived in Wołyń so it makes sense. But I don’t know which region of Czechia he came from, personally, I think he came from Cieszyn Silesia as he moved to the countryside and wasn’t very rich. Most people in Bohemia were either rich/educated or were ethnic Germans and hence “privileged”. Albeit if he was Silesian, chances are he had some German ancestor but that’s beside the point.

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