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  • #478085

    pollex
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    @pollex

    There are many Soviet military songs which are commonly considered now as Russians but they in fact were created in Ukraine and/or by Ukrainians (who frequently were Ukrainians of Hebrew origin). For Ukrainians and Russians it’s probably a well-known fact but it was a revelation for me.

    I should note that popular term “Russian Hebrew” is completely wrong.
    It was prohibited to Hebrews in Russian Empire to live in ethnically Russian regions. They were allowed to live only on the territory of former Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth where they lived before Russian occupation. Because of this fact all so-called “Russian” Hebrews are in fact Ukrainian, Belarusian, Lithuanian or Polish.

    Being very discriminated national group Hebrews had reasons to not like Russian Empire and monarchy not less then Ukrainians did. Lenin promised that the new Soviet State will be a totally new country where all nations will have equal rights. Probably just because of this fact many Hebrews, Ukrainians, Latvians etc joined Red Army. We may remember for example that even the founder of the Red Army and its first Commander was Ukrainian Hebrew Leo Trotzki (born in Kherson Governorate of Ukraine).

    #478086

    pollex
    Participant
    @pollex

    The first song in this collection is the song

    “Красная армия всех сильней” (Red Army Is the Strongest)

    which was written by Samuil Pokrass (born in Kiev, Ukraine) in year 1920 in Kiev (Ukraine) for the Ukrainian Red Army.

    In previous 1919 year Russian imperialists and monarchists organized in so-called White Army occupied Crimea peninsula. The commander of the White Army was Pyotr Wrangel who is mentioned in this song by his nickname “Black baron”. In year 1920 Wrangel’s forces made an attempt to occupy the whole Ukraine but were defeated by Ukrainian Red Army in the epic battle in South-Ukrainian steppes near city of Kakhovka. And shortly thereafter Russian imperialists were thrown away from Crimea as well.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tntA_4IoxbE

    This song translated to German:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BEYWCrzbVco

    #478087

    pollex
    Participant
    @pollex

    This 1920 year war events may be illustrated by this epic Ukrainian Red cavalry charge in Ukrainian steppe from the Ukrainian movie “How the Steel Was Tempered” based on the novel by Ukrainian writer Mykola Ostrovskyj (born in Volhynian Governorate of Ukraine):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MHcgyI_Y3xI

    Accompanying song in this case however is not Ukrainian but Russian one. It’s the song “И вновь продолжается бой” (The battle is going on again) from the late soviet epoch by Russian composer Aleksandra Pakhmutova.

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