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  • #344956

    Anonymous

    The Great Ustyug is the land of Russian the Father Frost (Дед Мороз). It is in the northeast of Vologda Oblast, located at the confluence of the Sukhona and Yug Rivers.

    And I would like to show you how the residence of Ded Moroz looks like :)

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    Россия. Великий Устюг. Вотчина Деда Мороза.

    #407977

    Anonymous

    Thanks this is great and will share this with my students after new years.  I always liked the imagery and story of dzed moroz better than Santa Claus 

    #407978

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Thanks this is great and will share this with my students after new years.  I always liked the imagery and story of dzed moroz better than Santa Claus

    You are welcome.
    More information:

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    Ded Moroz (Russian: Дед Мороз, diminutive Dedushka Moroz; Ukrainian: Дід Мороз Did Moroz, Belarusian Dzied Maroz Дзед Мароз) is a fictional character who in some Slavic cultures plays a role similar to that of Santa Claus. The literal translation of the name would be "Old Man Frost", although the name is often translated as "Father Frost" in light of the modern usage of "ded" to refer to a grandfather. Ded Moroz is said to bring presents to children, however, unlike the secretive Santa Claus, the gifts are often delivered "in person", at New Year's Eve parties and other New Year celebrations.

    Specifically, Ded Moroz is often shown wearing a red, blue or white heel-length fur coat, a semi-round fur hat, and valenki or jackboots on his feet. Unlike Santa Claus, he is often depicted as walking with a long magical staff.

    Depictions of Ded Moroz commonly show him accompanied by Snegurochka (Russian: Снегурочка, "Snow Maiden"), his granddaughter and helper, who is often depicted in long silver-blue robes and a furry cap or a kokoshnik like crown. She is a unique attribute of Ded Moroz; no traditional gift-givers from other cultures are portrayed with a similar companion.

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    [img width=494 height=700]http://i043.radikal.ru/1012/84/80c66c38088b.jpg” />

    [img width=502 height=700]http://www.artscroll.ru/Images/2008/n/Natali%20Colombina/000098.jpg” />

    The earliest tales of Ded Moroz presented him as a wicked and cruel sorcerer, similar to the Old Slavic gods "Pozvizd"—the god of wind and good and bad weather, "Zimnik"—god of winter, and the terrifying "Korochun"—an underworld god ruling over frosts.

    Since the 19th century the attributes and legend of Ded Moroz have been shaped by literary influences. The fairy tale play Snegurochka by the famous Russian playwright Aleksandr Ostrovsky was influential in this respect, as was Rimsky-Korsakov's Snegurochka with libretto based on the play. By the end of the 19th century Ded Moroz had become the most popular of the various mythical New Year gift-givers in Russia.

    Ded Moroz in modern Russia
    Vladimir Putin, then President of the Russian Federation was reported to have visited Ded Moroz' residence in Veliky Ustyug on January 7, 2008.

    Ded Moroz is very popular in modern Russia. In 1998, the town of Veliky Ustyug in Vologda Oblast, Russia was declared the home of the Russian Ded Moroz by Yury Luzhkov, then Mayor of Moscow. Between 2003 and 2010, the post office in Veliky Ustyug received approximately 2,000,000 letters from within Russia and from all over the world for Ded Moroz. On January 7, 2008, then President Putin of the Russian Federation was reported to have visited Ded Moroz' residence in the town of Veliky Ustyug as part of the Russian Orthodox Christmas Eve celebration.

    In November and December 2010, Ded Moroz was one of the candidates in the running for consideration as a mascot for the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia

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    And the link for those who know Russianhttp://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%94%D0%B5%D0%B4_%D0%9C%D0%BE%D1%80%D0%BE%D0%B7

    #407979

    Anonymous

    Which are oldest mentions of Dedek Mraz?

    #407980

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Which are oldest mentions of Dedek Mraz?

    Sorry that in Russian but english version is not full of that information.

    В литературную традицию Дед Мороз входит[5] в 1840 году, с публикацией сборника сказок «Сказки дедушки Иринея» В. Ф. Одоевского. Среди прочих, там была сказка «Мороз Иванович»[8]. В ней впервые дана литературная обработка фольклорного и обрядового Мороза. Созданный Одоевским образ ещё не слишком похож на знакомого новогоднего персонажа. Календарная приуроченность сказки — не Рождество или Новый год, а весна. Поэтому Мороз Иванович живёт в ледяной стране, вход в которую открывается через колодец. И не Мороз Иванович приходит к детям, а дети приходят к нему. Никаких подарков к какой-то дате он не делает, хотя и может щедро вознаградить за хорошо выполненную работу. Однако, как пишет исследователь[5]:

        … образ этот уже узнаваем: «добрый Мороз Иванович» — «седой-седой» старик, который «как тряхнёт головой — от волос иней сыплется»; живёт он в ледяном доме, а спит на перине из пушистого снега. Рукодельницу за хорошую работу он одаривает «горстью серебряных пятачков», однако и Ленивицу не замораживает (как Морозко старухину дочь в сказке), а лишь проучивает, дав ей вместо серебра сосульку. … В педагогической сказке Одоевского обрядовый Мороз и сказочный Морозко превращены в доброго, но справедливого воспитателя и наставника.

    Достаточно долгое время Мороз Иванович и ёлка с Новым годом существовали по раздельности. Их объединение произошло во второй половине XIX века, когда в России отмечаются первые попытки создать самобытного «рождественского деда», который дарил бы подарки русским детям, как у их западных сверстников.

    В 1886 году впервые отмечается «Морозко», и к началу ХХ века уже складывается знакомый образ Деда Мороза

    And in 1930 there is the complete image of modern Ded Moroz.

    #407981

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Sorry that in Russian but english version is not full of that information.
    And in 1930 there is the complete image of modern Ded Moroz.

    Ok np thanks. :)

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